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World Diabetes Day 2017: What Does Ayurveda Say About Controlling Diabetes?

World Diabetes Day 2017: What Does Ayurveda Say About Controlling Diabetes?

World Diabetes Day 2017: What Does Ayurveda Say About Controlling Diabetes?

Diabetes Mellitus is a condition wherein either the body is unable to produce enough insulin or is not able to use the insulin properly. According to official WHO data, the number of people suffering from diabetes rose from 108 million as recorded in the year 1980 to a whopping 422 million in the year 2014. With a sharp increase in the number of diabetics in the country, Indian is often called the diabetes capital of the world with over to 50 million people suffering from the ailment - 69.2 million to be precise, as reported by the International Diabetes Federation Atlas 2015. WHO's assessment, stood at 63 million in the year 2013. The estimates depict number of diabetes cases to have alarmingly doubled and grown by over 100% in the past 15 years. India had an estimated 31,705,000 diabetics in the millennium year which is estimated to grow by over 100% to 79,441,000 by 2030.
"Diabetes is strongly associated with the western diet, however as cultures switch from their native diets to the foods of commerce; their rate of diabetes increases eventually reaching the proportions seen in the western societies. What's alarming is the fact that the number of diabetes cases is estimated to reach a whopping 100 million by 2030," noted a renowned Health Practitioner, Nutritionist and certified Macrobiotic Health Coach, Shilpa Arora ND.
Diet plays a crucial role in diabetes prevention as well as management. The effectiveness and the significance of natural ingredients cannot be overlooked in treating and managing diabetes. Alternative therapy can go a long way in providing relief and im Continue reading

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UAB Medicine News

UAB Medicine News

Alabama has the second worst rate of diabetes in the nation; someone is diagnosed with the chronic disease about every 15 seconds in our state. And rates are rapidly rising. In fact, current statistics suggest that among children born in the past 17 years, 1 in 3 will develop diabetes during their lifetime, and the projected rate for minorities is 1 in 2.
The Diabetes and Nutrition Education Clinic at The Kirklin Clinic of UAB Hospital is here to help prevent complications from uncontrolled diabetes by providing information, support, and skills training to help people with diabetes self-manage their condition.
Common Myths
Education is a critical part of both diabetes prevention and treatment, as there are many misconceptions about the disease. Below, the American Diabetes Association dispels some common myths to help you and your loved ones stay knowledgeable about diabetes.
Myth: Diabetes is not that serious of a disease.
Fact: Diabetes causes more deaths each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Having diabetes nearly doubles your chance of having a heart attack. The good news is that proper diabetes control can reduce your risk for diabetes complications.
Myth: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes.
Fact: The answer is not so simple. Type 1 diabetes is caused by genetics and unknown factors that trigger the onset of the disease. Type 2 diabetes is caused by genetics and lifestyle factors. Being overweight does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes, and a diet high in calories from any source contributes to weight gain. Research has shown that drinking Continue reading

national diabetes awareness month

national diabetes awareness month

In case you weren’t aware, November is National Diabetes Awareness month. Why am I dedicating an entire post to that? My youngest son, Calvin, is a Type 1 Diabetic.
I want to share more about diabetes because 1.) people have asked me for updates and 2.) T1D is sneaky and knowing the symptoms can save someone’s life. So, even if you don’t give a hoot about diabetes, just read the symptoms and store that away in the recesses of your brain. Not to be dramatic, but it really might save the life of someone you know. I am convinced that Calvin was diagnosed early, before he was in real trouble, because my mom knew the symptoms.
First of all a few details about T1D. Most people are familiar with type 2 diabetes, since most people with diabetes have type 2. Less than 10% of diabetics have type 1 and only 15% of those with T1D are children. Almost all of the “diabetic-friendly” foods, recipe books, magazines, and general information is geared towards type 2, so there is a lot of misunderstanding about type 1.
Type 2 diabetes is when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin or develops a resistance to it. It sometimes needs to be treated with insulin injections, but can also be treated with oral medications and controlled diet. Type 2 can, in most cases, be reversed with a change in diet and activity, along with weight loss.
T1D cannot be prevented and it cannot be reversed. It is an auto-immune disease. The body attacks and kills off the beta cells in the pancreas, which produce insulin, until the pancreas no longer has enough beta cells to produce insulin. It’s a gradu Continue reading

Type 2 diabetes: Symptoms, early signs, and complications

Type 2 diabetes: Symptoms, early signs, and complications

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can develop at any age, although it is more common in middle-aged and older adults. But what are the early signs and symptoms of this condition?
Type 2 diabetes results in high blood sugar levels and is believed to affect 29.1 million Americans. It accounts for up to 95 percent of all diabetes cases, according to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
In this article, we explore the early signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes. We also look at the associated risk factors and potential complications of the condition.
What is type 2 diabetes?
People with type 2 diabetes do not make or use insulin correctly. Insulin is a hormone that regulates movement of blood glucose (sugar) into cells. Blood glucose is the body’s source of energy and comes from food.
When sugar cannot enter cells, it builds up and the body is unable to rely on it for energy. If the body is unable to get glucose, the result is symptoms of type 2 diabetes.
A doctor may suspect diabetes if a person’s blood sugar levels are above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL).
Symptoms of type 2 diabetes
There are a number of symptoms of type 2 diabetes that people should be aware of. Awareness of these may help them get advice and a possible diagnosis. The sooner someone with type 2 diabetes is diagnosed, the sooner they can begin treatment to manage the condition.
Symptoms include the following:
Frequent urination and increased thirst: When excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the body’s t Continue reading

Your Game Plan to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Your Game Plan to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes prevention is proven, possible, and powerful. Taking small steps, such as eating less and moving more to lose weight, can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and related health problems. The information below is based on the NIH-sponsored Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) research study, which showed that people could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes even if they were at high risk for the disease.
Follow these steps to get started on your game plan.
If you are overweight, set a weight-loss goal that you can reach. Try to lose at least 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, a 10-percent weight-loss goal means that you will try to lose 20 pounds.
Research shows that you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being more active each day.
Find ways to be active every day. Start slowly and add more activity until you get to at least 30 minutes of physical activity, like a brisk walk, 5 days a week.
Keep track of your progress to help you reach your goals. Use your phone, a printed log, online tracker, app, or other device to record your weight, what you eat and drink, and how long you are active.
Ask your health care team about steps you can take to prevent type 2 diabetes. Learn about other ways to help reach your goal, such as taking the medicine metformin. Also, ask if your health insurance covers services for weight loss or physical activity.
It’s not easy to make and stick to lifelong changes in what you eat and how often you are active. Get your frien Continue reading

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