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Why Is My Blood Sugar High After Meals?

Why is My Blood Sugar High After Meals?

Why is My Blood Sugar High After Meals?


For people suffering from high blood sugar , the level spiking after a meal is quite frequent. Now, the question that strikes in your mind is that why the level rises? Lets have a look and analyze the situation which brings such radical change.
What activities should I do to avoid diabetes?
What makes my blood sugar level rise after meals?
After a meal, the carbohydrate is broken down into simpler substances. Glucose is the basic unit to get absorbed into the bloodstream. Its natural for the blood sugar level to rise after a meal. For ordinary people, the blood sugar to come back to normalcy after a certain level. But for a person who is affected with diabetes, it stays high for a more extended period. The reason is that the insulin that is supposed to get released from pancreas does not work reasonably or else it is very slow. Insulin is responsible for absorbing glucose from your bloodstream.
What immediate effects you have after your blood sugar level spikes?
You think the difficulty in concentrating and remembering.
It affects your athletic performance. It affects your strength, flexibility, and endurance.
It affects your irritability or mood shifts
What should I do so that I do not face sugar spikes after meals?
Break down your meals into smaller ones. It gives enough time, and the glucose level in the blood does not shoot up. It also provides enough time for absorption of glucose and the insulin works on the carbohydrate.
Check on your GI ( glycemic index ) and have food based on it. Diet with higher glycemic index results in higher blood level after meals Continue reading

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HEALTH MATTERS: Comedian learns pre-diabetes is no laughing matter

HEALTH MATTERS: Comedian learns pre-diabetes is no laughing matter

You probably recognize actress and comedian Cocoa Brown from Tyler Perry’s critically acclaimed comedy series “For Better or Worse” on Oprah Winfrey’s OWN network or from the feature films, “Single Mom’s Club,” and “Ted 2.”
Three years ago, Brown was pregnant and overjoyed with the anticipation of the birth of her child. The joy of her first pregnancy was quickly overshadowed in her last trimester when she was diagnosed with gestational diabetes.
“I had to inject five insulin shots a day,” Brown said.
Typically, most women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms. Women may experience symptoms that are a little more severe than the typical symptoms resulting from a normal pregnancy, such as extreme thirst, fatigue, frequent urination and snoring.
Pregnant women are more at risk to get gestational diabetes if they are overweight before they get pregnant, are of ethnic background (African-American, Asian, Hispanic or Native American), have high blood sugar levels, other family members with diabetes or previous history of gestational diabetes.
Brown, who mastered the art of comedy, knew that her weight gain was no laughing matter.
“At my heaviest, I weighed 273 pounds,” she said. “I am 5-5 and was wearing a triple X dress size or a size 22-24.”
Brown is known for her stand-up comedic performances on top-rated comedy shows including BET’s “Comic View,” “One Mic Stand” and “Showtime at the Apollo.”
Gestational diabetes is temporary.
“After giving birth to my son, it disappeared,” Brown said. “So, I didn’t change my eating hab Continue reading

You’re Increasing Your Risk of Diabetes and Alzheimer’s With This 1 Horrible Habit

You’re Increasing Your Risk of Diabetes and Alzheimer’s With This 1 Horrible Habit

You’ve heard it before — your high-sugar diet is increasing your risk of diabetes, and all those loud concerts up your chances of developing Alzheimer’s. And that’s not to mention how your genetic makeup may be working against you. Cleaning up your diet and getting regular exercise are key in disease prevention, but that’s not all there is to it. There’s still one horrible habit most of us let slide — and it could be the one that kills you.
Alzheimer’s and diabetes are inflammatory diseases
So, what do Alzheimer’s and diabetes have in common? They’re both diseases that can result from chronic inflammation. Let’s be clear — your inflammatory response is actually designed to protect your body, but chronic inflammation can really hurt you and lead to a wealth of issues. And if the chronic issue goes untreated, it can damage your cells and tissue over time, which contributes to the development of these lifelong ailments.
Your bad diet and poor exercise routine can contribute to inflammation, but so can the following habit you need to stop asap.
Binge-watching TV is killing you
According to researchers from the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, there’s a crucial (and deadly) link between binge-watching your favorite show and the development of chronic inflammatory disease. The researchers surveyed 8,900 adults and found “every extra hour per day spent watching television led to a 12% higher risk of death linked to inflammation … ”
So, who’s watching the most TV? Older folks, current and ex-smokers, those with lower household incomes, and those Continue reading

November is Diabetes Month

November is Diabetes Month

Taking small steps can have huge impacts!
Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. It can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled.
One in 10 Americans have diabetes — that’s more than 30 million people and another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. This means about half the adult population have prediabetes or diabetes.
The good news!
People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes. These changes include: eating healthy, getting more physical activity, and losing weight.
Over the last decade, the incidence of new-onset diagnosed diabetes in U.S. adults has increased by 90% (1). Although there has been a steady rise in type 2 diabetes, the rate of increase markedly changed around 1990 (2). Interestingly, this rate of increase parallels the rate of increase in chemical production and consumption of increasingly calorically dense processed foods.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 84 million Americans are living with prediabetes, yet almost 90 percent don’t know they have it. This means they may be unaware of the long-term health risks associated with progressing to type 2 diabetes and the increased risks of heart attack and stroke (3).
Diabetes is a condition when your blood becomes too sweet, that is too say, that your body is no longer able to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Although there are many factor Continue reading

Diabetes and Discrimination: A Real Life Case

Diabetes and Discrimination: A Real Life Case


www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Know Your Rights > Discrimination
Diabetes and Discrimination: A Real Life Case
What if you were arrested and not given access to your insulin? It happened in Philadelphiaagain and again. But it won't happen anymore.
by Marie McCarren. Taken from Diabetes Forecast (September 2003)
Note: Updated Diabetes Care Article (2009)
A Philadelphia club owner walks into a lawyer's office and tells his tale: He was arrested for a liquor code violation. He uses an insulin pump. He told the arresting officer and later his jailors that he had diabetes and that he needed his medical supplies and some food in his cell.
First, his blood sugar dropped too low. A man in another cell called for help for him. According to the man, the police officer's reaction was, "He doesn't look so bad. Call me if he passes out." Steve Rosen was finally given something sweet to drink. Two hours later, his pump ran out of insulin. He told the cell room officer. Nothing was done. Finally, after 23 hours in custody and nearly 12 hours after his pump had run dry, Rosen was able to convince the police he was in serious medical distress. He was transferred to the ER. His blood sugar level was 446, his blood pressure was 200/120, and he had ketoacidosis.
Someone familiar with type 1 diabetes might have been shocked and outraged at the treatment Rosen got. And the lawyer, Alan Yatvin, was familiar with diabetes. But he wasn't shocked. Because this wasn't the first such case Yatvin had worked on.
In 1982, after a lawsuit over a person falsely imprisoned while experie Continue reading

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