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Why Is My Blood Sugar High After Exercise?

Why is My Blood Sugar High After Exercise?

Why is My Blood Sugar High After Exercise?

When you have the excess of glucose in your bloodstream that does not get absorbed by the insulin secreted by your body, the condition is known as diabetes. Diabetes can lead to severe consequences like degeneration of internal organs, but if treated at an early stage will cure quickly.
Why it is that blood sugar level increases after you exercise?
If your body triggers low amount of insulin, then the presence of other hormones like epinephrine, norepinephrine, cortisol, glucagon will collectively trigger the liver to release the glucose into the blood and thereby increases the blood sugar. The hormones influence the breakdown of fat into smaller and simpler particles.
The other thought process says that the hormones trigger the liver to release glucose into the bloodstream while exercising. The level of hormones in the bloodstream may result from glucose to enter the blood.
For people who are not athletes, high-intensity exercise is not required for controlling blood glucose level. In fact, more easy and light exercise will work if preferred. The high-level activity might result in muscle injury and other fatal consequences.
What tips should I follow while exercising, so that to keep my blood sugar under control?
If you have settled your mind for exercise, there are some considerations that you must follow.
Think about all the enjoyable activities you did in the past. Yoga, swimming, dancing, gardening, jumping, and kickboxing (might be). Anything that will raise your heart rate will do well. Continue the practice of these activities.
Let your doctor know when and what exe Continue reading

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Exercise for Diabetes Control

Exercise for Diabetes Control

By the dLife Editors
In case you haven’t heard: Exercise is really good for people with type 2 diabetes. It helps control blood sugar levels, increases energy levels, improves heart health, and promotes emotional well-being. Barring other medical complications, the majority of people with diabetes can and should exercise for diabetes control and for better overall health and well-being.
How does exercise lower blood sugar?
Exercise lowers blood sugar in two ways:
First, exercise increases insulin sensitivity. This means that your cells are better able to use available insulin to absorb sugar from the bloodstream to be used as energy for your body.
Second, exercise stimulates another mechanism that allows your muscles to absorb and use sugar for energy, even without insulin.
Not only does exercise lower blood sugar levels in the short term, but exercising over time also contributes to lower A1C levels over time.
How important is exercise?
Leading a sedentary (or inactive) lifestyle is one of the major risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, and the high incidence of obesity and overweight among people with type 2 is also highly correlated with inactivity. Starting a workout program can lower body mass and consequently decrease the insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes; studies have shown that people with type 2 diabetes who exercise regularly have better A1c profiles than those who don’t. Along with medical nutrition therapy, exercise is one of the first lines of defense in type 2 diabetes control.
In addition, exercise is a key tool in preventing one of the leading Continue reading

Type 1 Diabetes in Adults: Can It Be Prevented?

Type 1 Diabetes in Adults: Can It Be Prevented?

Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile-onset diabetes, meaning it starts in childhood. But new studies show Type 1 is frequently being diagnosed in adults as well.
A study at Exeter University in the United Kingdom found that adults are as likely as children to develop Type 1 diabetes. More than 40% of Type 1 diabetes cases occur after the age of 30, but many are misdiagnosed as Type 2.
What’s the difference?
Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes limit our bodies’ ability to use carbohydrate foods. In the body, carbohydrates break down into a sugar called glucose, which is our cells’ main source of energy.
Normally, we need the hormone called insulin to transport glucose into the cells of the body. In Type 1 diabetes, the body no longer produces much insulin. The insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas have been destroyed. Immune cells, usually GAD (glutamic acid decarboxylase) antibodies, or sometimes other antibodies, have attacked them.
The reason for the attack is unknown. People with Type 1 diabetes are dependent on injected or infused insulin to get glucose into their cells to stay alive. This “autoimmune” destruction of cells usually happens to children, but we now know it can happen at any age.
In Type 2 diabetes, the body still produces insulin, but the body’s cells don’t cooperate with it. They have become “insulin resistant,” meaning the body needs extra insulin to maintain normal blood sugar levels.
Type 2 used to be called “adult-onset diabetes” or “non-insulin dependent diabetes.” Those names are now outdated. People age 10 and you Continue reading

What Really Causes Type 2 Diabetes

What Really Causes Type 2 Diabetes

Learn Which Risk Factors Are Preventable
Contrary to popular belief, type 2 diabetes (a chronic disease) isn’t caused by eating lots of sweets. Actually, the cause is still unknown, but there are certain factors that are known to increase a person’s risk of developing this metabolic disorder. There are two main categories of risks that are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes—those that you can't change (uncontrollable), and those that you can (controllable). The more risk factors you have, the higher your risk for developing type 2 diabetes.
Uncontrollable Risk Factors
Although these factors are out of your control, it is important to know whether you fall into any of these higher-risk categories.
Your age. Your risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases as you get older. Diabetes most often affects people over age 40, and people over 65 are at even higher risk. It is recommended that people aged 45 and older be tested for diabetes every three years.
Your family history. There is some evidence that diabetes runs in families. If your parent or sibling has type 2 diabetes, for example, your risk of developing diabetes increases.
Your race. Certain ethnicities—African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islander Americans—are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes.
Your health history. Women who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy are 50% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. Giving birth to a baby over nine pounds also increases a woman's risk. Other illnesses and conditio Continue reading

Effects of Alcohol on Diabetes

Effects of Alcohol on Diabetes

Alcohol, which is made from fermented yeast, sugars, and starches is a very commonly used substance.
In fact, 87.6% of adults aged 18 and over have consumed it at some point in their lifetime. It is also known as a depressant due to its capability to depress the central nervous system. About 71% have drank in the past year.
When enjoyed in moderation, alcohol does not pose a risk, and actually has some health benefits to it.
However, for those with diabetes, it can be a struggle to maintain a safe blood sugar while drinking. It is very easy to become hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemic (high blood sugar), depending on which type of diabetes you have and the medications that you take. Understanding the effects drinking has on diabetes is very important.
This article discusses the risks and benefits of drinking.
It also explains what drinks are best for individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.
Can I drink if I have diabetes?
You can most certainly drink alcohol with diabetes. The key, just like many other things, is to do so in moderation.
Also, if your blood sugar is not under good control, you should not drink because it can cause it to become too high or too low. Your doctor should be aware of your drinking habits so that they can make sure that you are not experiencing any complications related to it.
I recommend reading the following articles:
How does alcohol affect diabetes and my blood sugar levels?
Normally, the liver is the organ that stores and secretes glucose to the cells in the body to fuel them when you are not eating. The liver is also responsi Continue reading

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