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Why Does Diabetes Cause Headaches?

Why does diabetes cause headaches?

Why does diabetes cause headaches?

Diabetes is a condition where the body cannot make enough of the hormone insulin, or cannot use it properly, causing glucose to build up in the blood. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 29 million people in the United States have diabetes.
Diabetes does not usually cause headaches. But, while headaches are not dangerous, they may be an indication of poor blood sugar control in a person with diabetes.
Over time, periods of continuous high or low blood sugar can lead to serious and even life-threatening health complications, such as heart disease and kidney failure.
This article looks at the connection between diabetes and headaches and suggests ways to relieve diabetes-induced headaches.
Contents of this article:
Types of headache
According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, published by the International Headache Society, there are over 150 types of headaches.
Broadly speaking, headaches can be classified as either primary or secondary:
Primary headaches are ones that are not linked to another medical condition. Examples of primary headaches include migraines and tension headaches.
Secondary headaches are caused by underlying medical conditions or health issues and include the type of headache often experienced by people with diabetes.
Other causes of secondary headaches include:
hormone fluctuations
infection
nerve disorders
overuse of medication
trauma
The pain associated with either primary or secondary headaches can vary in severity and duration. Some people may not experience headaches often, while others can Continue reading

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Blood Sugar Monitoring: When to Check and Why

Blood Sugar Monitoring: When to Check and Why

Managing diabetes is one part investigation and two parts action. Unlike some other diseases that rely primarily on professional medical treatment, diabetes treatment requires active participation by the person who has it. Monitoring your blood sugar level on a regular basis and analyzing the results is believed by many to be a crucial part of the treatment equation.
When someone is first diagnosed with diabetes, he is usually given a blood sugar meter (or told to go buy one) and told how and when to use it, as well as what numbers to shoot for. However, the advice a person receives on when to monitor and what the results should be generally depend on his type of diabetes, age, and state of overall health. It can also depend on a health-care provider’s philosophy of care and which set of diabetes care guidelines he follows. At least three major health organizations have published slightly different recommendations regarding goals for blood sugar levels.
There is some common ground when it comes to blood sugar monitoring practices. For example, most people take a fasting reading before breakfast every morning. Some people also monitor before lunch, dinner, and bedtime; some monitor after each meal; and some monitor both before and after all meals. However, when monitoring after meals, some people do it two hours after the first bite of the meal, while others prefer to check one hour after the start of a meal.
To help sort out the whys and when of monitoring, three diabetes experts weigh in with their opinions. While they don’t agree on all the details, they do agree on o Continue reading

How to Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How to Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America.
Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1)
Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way.
The Diabetes Epidemic
Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2)
The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estima Continue reading

These People Reversed Their Diabetes In 30 Days With This One Change

These People Reversed Their Diabetes In 30 Days With This One Change

Diabetes is one of the most rampant diseases of our time. According to the American Diabetes Association, in 2012, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, had diabetes.
In fact, diabetes is growing at an exponential rate. A study completed by the CDC and Research Triangle Institute concluded that if “recent trends in diabetes prevalence rates continue linearly over the next 50 years, future changes in the size and demographic characteristics of the U.S. population will lead to dramatic increases in the number of Americans with diagnosed diabetes.”
According to the current mainstream approach, the major goal in treating diabetes is to minimize any elevation of blood sugar (glucose) without causing abnormally low levels of blood sugar as well. Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin, exercise, and a diabetic diet, while type 2 diabetes is treated first with weight reduction, a diabetic diet, and exercise.
According to the American Diabetes Association and mainstream medicine in general, “Diabetes is a chronic disease that has no cure.”
But what if we could not only prevent diabetes before it happened, but also reverse it once it shows up?
Six Test Subjects Reverse Diabetes in 30 Days
In the film Simply Raw: Reversing Diabetes in 30 Days, six test subjects, all of whom were diabetic and taking insulin but had varying lifestyles and conditions, embark on a radical new treatment method. Five had type 2 diabetes and one had type 1.
Before we get into the results of this film, let’s take note of what is established about type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This inform Continue reading

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a nutrition coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health. “Type 2 diabetes is really complex.”
That said, some research does suggest that eating too many sweetened foods can affect type 2 diabetes risk, and with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating that 30.3 million Americans have the disease — and that millions of more individuals are projected to develop it, too — understanding all the risk factors for the disease, including sugar consumption, is essential to help reverse the diabetes epidemic.
The Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes Story: Not So Sweet
After the suspicion that sugar was the cause of diabetes, the scientific community pointed its finger at carbohydrates. That makes sense, notes Grieger, explaining that simple and complex carbohydrates are both metabolized as sugar, leading blood sugar levels to fluctuate.
Yet carbs are processed differently in the body based on their type: While simple carbs are digested and metabolized quickly, complex carbs take longer to go through this system, resulting in more stable blood sugar. “It comes down to their chemical forms: A simple carbohydrate has a simple Continue reading

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