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Why Diabetes Test Strips Are So Expensive

Why Diabetes Test Strips are So Expensive

Why Diabetes Test Strips are So Expensive

Diabetes Test Strips are the Most Expensive RX for Diabetics
I have been diabetic for nearly 10 years. I have Type 1 diabetes, which means that I am 100% insulin dependent and there is no "cure" for my disease, no matter how much I diet or exercise. An auto-immune reaction attacked the healthy beta cells in my pancreas, killing them off for good so that they will never make insulin again.
Because insulin is such a powerful drug, it is easy to overdose, causing life threatening hypoglycemia. Type 1 diabetics must calculate the amount of insulin to dose, based on a number of factors including: (1) how many carbohydrates will be ingested; (2) how long it has been since the last insulin shot; (3) activity level; and (4) stress level.
You might think that insulin would be the most expensive prescription for diabetics. Or perhaps glucose meters.
Nope. You can dose yourself and own a meter and lancet to poke your finger to measure blood sugar levels. However, without diabetes test strips, a diabetic cannot effectively manage this serious disease. Inexplicably, the test strips are the most expensive item that is required for diabetics to properly manage their disease.
I find this frustrating, to say the least. Not only because I am out-of-pocket additional funds (even with health insurance it runs me about $75 per month), but because my insurance company doubts my dedication to frequent testing to keep me healthy - and alive. Every time, I seek to refill my prescription, I get grief.
Why is this? Why are diabetes test strips so expensive?
Some People Sell Excess Diabetes Test Strip Continue reading

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Double Diabetes: Dealing with Insulin Resistance in Type 1 Diabetes

Double Diabetes: Dealing with Insulin Resistance in Type 1 Diabetes

Recently, Glu published a Call to Action to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in response to their recent report highlighting a significant reduction in newly diagnosed cases of diabetes. Although it appeared to represent significant progress in reducing the global obesity epidemic, the report was soon regarded as problematic, largely due to the lack of distinction between type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) within their data set.
Many from the diabetes community weighed in on the importance of separating T1D and T2D in media reports—highlighting differences in origin, treatment, and challenges. Most of us would agree that this dialogue was long overdue. After all, T1D and T2D are two separate diseases—right? Well, that’s where things get complicated. While there remains a great deal of confusion around the differences between T1D and T2D, there is a unique set of individuals dealing with a third option—a condition known as double diabetes.
What Is Double Diabetes?
The term “double diabetes” was first introduced in 1991, when a research study1 showed that participants with T1D who had a family history of T2D were more likely to be overweight and have difficulty achieving optimal glycemic control. Since this study was published, researchers have conducted numerous epidemiological studies on this topic.
As the name suggests, double diabetes is a condition characterized by features of both T1D and T2D2. It can exist in many forms, such as a person living with T1D who develops insulin resistance or a person with T2D who has autoantibo Continue reading

9 Popular Diabetes Management Apps of 2017

9 Popular Diabetes Management Apps of 2017

Many people are not exactly aware of what diabetes is. We may have heard about it on the news or through a family friend who has it, however, that doesn’t mean everyone knows what it is, how you get it and how to manage it.
Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way the body processes blood sugar otherwise known as your glucose level. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas produces little or no insulin which is why it has to be checked often. If not managed properly, your sugar can be too high or too low which can cause blurred vision, upset stomach and dizziness.
For the people that have been diagnosed with this chronic illness, it is imperative that they are continually checking their sugar levels, watching what they eat and keeping up with daily exercise.
Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to harmful and life-threatening issues. Some of the complications of diabetes include but which are not limited to damaging blood vessels that lead to your heart, eyes, kidneys and even nerves.
If this gets out of hand it can lead to strokes, vision loss, heart attack and even permanent nerve damage. Diabetes is not something to be taken lightly and needs constant attention. Fortunately for us, we now live in a cyber world in which tracking out diabetes has never been easier especially with these top apps.
Fooducate
This app has gotten a four and a half-star review for its ability in being not only a weight loss coach but also for monitoring your carbs, exercise, hunger, sleep schedule and moods.
This app also explains pros and cons of certain food which helps you better understand Continue reading

Doctors 'wrong to assume type 1 diabetes is childhood illness'

Doctors 'wrong to assume type 1 diabetes is childhood illness'

Doctors are wrong to assume that type 1 diabetes mainly affects children, according to a new study that shows it is equally prevalent in adults.
The findings, published in the journal Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, overturn previous thinking that the form of diabetes, an auto-immune condition, is primarily a childhood illness. Scientists from Exeter University found that in a lot of cases it was actually misdiagnosed among adults.
“Diabetes textbooks for doctors say that type 1 diabetes is a childhood illness. But our study shows that it is prevalent throughout life. The assumption among many doctors is that adults presenting with the symptoms of diabetes will have type 2 but this misconception can lead to misdiagnosis with potentially serious consequences,” said Dr Richard Oram, a senior lecturer at the University of Exeter and consultant physician.
The research, funded by the Wellcome Trust and Diabetes UK, was based on the UK Biobank, a resource which includes data and genetic information from 500,000 people aged between 40 and 69 from across the country. Participants provided blood, urine and saliva samples for future analysis, detailed information about themselves and agreed to have their health followed.
“The key thing we were looking for with this study was whether people presented with type 1 diabetes in adulthood and at what age this occurred. This was only possible because of the unique combination of health records and genetic data,” said Oram.
“What was really surprising in our research is that nearly 50% of type 1 diabetes cases occurred in adulthoo Continue reading

What Does A1C Stand For?

What Does A1C Stand For?

You may have heard of a diabetes test called a hemoglobin A1c, sometimes called HgbA1c, HbA1c, or just A1C. What is an A1C test, and what should you know about it?
HgbA1c is hemoglobin (pronounced HE-mo-glow-bin) that has sugar attached to it. Hemoglobin is the protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to all the cells of the body. Hemoglobin is an important component of red blood cells (RBCs).
Nearly all cells in the human body need oxygen to power them. All animals with backbones, except one family of fish, have hemoglobin. Hemoglobin and molecules like it are also found in many invertebrates, plants, and fungi.
Types of hemoglobin
The “A” in Hemoglobin A (HgbA) stands for “adult.” After a person reaches six months of age, nearly all the hemoglobin is type A.
About 98% of HgbA is type 1, or HgBA1. There is also HgBA2 (in addition to other types of hemoglobin), but not much. Type A1 has subtypes A1a, A1b, A1c, and others. Type A1c is the most common, making up about two-thirds of hemoglobin with glucose attached.
HgbA1c is a good marker for glucose control, because the more glucose is circulating in the blood, the more hemoglobin will be glycated (covered with sugar).
What an A1C test means
Once hemoglobin is glycated, it stays that way until the red blood cell dies. Red blood cells live an average of three to four months. That is why your A1C level indicates your average glucose over the last few months.
A1C results are expressed as the percentage of all hemoglobin that is glycated. An A1C of 7.0% means an average blood glucose level of 154 mg/dl, according to th Continue reading

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