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WHO And ADA Promote 5 Cups Of Coffee To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes???

WHO and ADA promote 5 cups of coffee to prevent type 2 diabetes???

WHO and ADA promote 5 cups of coffee to prevent type 2 diabetes???

5 Cups of Coffee a Day for Type 2 Diabetes?
By Steve McDermott on January 10th, 2017
(Steve McDermott is a person with type 2 diabetes who wrote this article for Diabetes Daily).
“Coffee is one thing that we all love but can’t really decide if it’s good for us or not. Research in the past has shown that coffee and diabetes don’t go well together.
5 cups is good? If WHO says so, there might be something to it. Right?
However, new research, funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), indicates that coffee is good for:
• Cardiovascular diseases(myocardial infarction, high cholesterol…)
• Cancer (prostate, breast…)
• Parkinsons disease
• …And type 2 diabetes!
According to the research conducted by Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, from NFU School of Medicine:
(Of all the foods we consume) coffee has the most potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Forecast)
What is more, WHO has released guidelines for dietary recommendation for Americans for 2015-2020, in which they state that 3-5 cups of coffee is associated with health benefits (including for type 2 diabetes).
Seems like both the latest research and even WHO is pro-coffee. I know I’m pro-coffee myself, being an avid coffee drinker and I think it’s great I’m doing something good for myself by having a cup of coffee a day! Let alone 5 cups!
You can download the WHO statement here, I’ve copied the section about coffee for you here (be aware what is says about how much sugar and milk you should add to coffee):
Coffee and Diabetes – An Age Old Question
When talking about coffee and diabetes Continue reading

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New study claims statin drugs raise the risk of type-2 diabetes by almost 30%

New study claims statin drugs raise the risk of type-2 diabetes by almost 30%

(Natural News) Diabetes is one of the most common types of non-communicable diseases that kills millions of people yearly. Recent studies show that taking statins, or drugs that lower blood cholesterol, have a 30 percent chance in increasing the risk of developing type-2 diabetes.
Medical personnel have always known of the side effects of these drugs, but stress that the advantages significantly outweigh their disadvantages. Nevertheless, researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York have stated that these drugs impair insulin production. Insulin is a peptide hormone that regulates blood sugar level. When inadequate or absent, causes diabetes mellitus.
The decade-long study of more than 3,200 patients who took statins to treat and minimize the effects of cardiovascular diseases showed that statin-users had a 30 percent higher risk of developing type-2 diabetes. Despite the negative effects of statins, around six million Britons continue to take it, because it has been proven to lessen the chance of experiencing a repeat attack.
Dr. Tim Chico, a consultant cardiologist at Sheffield University, says that even if the study confirms the small risk of diabetes with statin treatment, the other main causes of diabetes, which are being overweight and obese, should be given more attention.
The effect of poor lifestyle choices
Diabetes is the result of an unbalanced and unhealthy lifestyle. Diabetes is also indicative of an intolerance for carbohydrates. The condition can be avoided by practicing proper nutrition habits and by engaging in a more active lifestyle. Continue reading

Type 2 Diabetes, Statins And Their Relationship To The Thyroid

Type 2 Diabetes, Statins And Their Relationship To The Thyroid

Connecting The Dots
My journey started long before I ever knew anything about thyroid disease. At twenty-five years old, I found out my father had his first heart attack and that he also had type 2 diabetes. That side of the family had a predisposition to being overweight and not living a healthy lifestyle. This scared me so much that I took drastic measures. In 1989, I changed everything about my diet. Eliminating all white sugar, white flour, process foods and all hormone/antibiotic meats and dairy from my eating regiment. My family and friends thought I was crazy. I thought I would be able to manipulate my genetics and prevent the inevitable path to disease.
Early on I battled with sugar imbalances and weight fluctuations for no apparent reason, but paid no attention to it as exercise fixed everything. Unknowingly, Hashimoto’s was already fixated on my physiology. Determined to beat the odds, I had to be consciously aware of what I ate and how I took care of myself.
Diagnosed is 2012 with Hashimoto’s and hypothyroid, I now had a new challenge: getting well and getting this disease under control so I could live my life. The last five years has had its ups and downs. For the last two years, I have been trying to lower my total cholesterol and LDL, while my triglycerides and glucose have been doing the roller-coaster dance. Nothing seemed to be working.
I turned 53 years old in June, two years from my father’s first heart attack. At the end of May, I had a sub fraction lipid test to determine what exactly my lipids were doing before deciding to add another drug to reg Continue reading

Cognitive Dysfunction and Diabetes Mellitus

Cognitive Dysfunction and Diabetes Mellitus

I. Introduction
DIABETES MELLITUS IS a complex metabolic disease that can have devastating effects on multiple organs in the body. Diabetes is the leading cause of end stage renal disease in the United States (1) and is also a common cause of vision loss, neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease. A less addressed and not as well recognized complication of diabetes is cognitive dysfunction. Patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus have been found to have cognitive deficits that can be attributed to their disease. Both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia have been implicated as causes of cognitive dysfunction, and many patients fear that recurrent hypoglycemia will impair their memory over time. Although much research has been done, the pathophysiology underlying this complication is not well understood, and the most appropriate methods to diagnose, treat, and prevent cognitive dysfunction in diabetes have not yet been defined. In this article, we will review the nature of cognitive dysfunction in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, the pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction secondary to diabetes, methodologies used to assess cognitive deficits in patients with diabetes, and potential future directions of research that are needed to advance our understanding of this often overlooked complication of diabetes.
The purpose of this article is to present a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the subject of cognitive dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. To do this, we performed MEDLINE searches for such key words and terms as “diabetes mellitus,” “cognitive fun Continue reading

Diabetes Warning Signs: Learn About the Signs to Be Prepared

Diabetes Warning Signs: Learn About the Signs to Be Prepared

Whether it be type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes some of the early warning signs are the same. By recognizing the signs you will be able to help your doctor give an early diagnosis and start treatment as soon as possible.
Yet, type 2 diabetes evolves slowly and there is a chance you might not get many warning signs.
Diabetes is a very serious illness but, at the same time, it’s common.
If you have diabetes, you need to regularly supervise your blood sugar levels and keep them under control within the adequate range.
Many people don’t know that there are different types of diabetes. It’s even common for those who are diagnosed to be surprised they have the disease, since symptoms appear gradually over the span of months or even years.
In this article, we’ll look at some of the diabetes warning signs you should pay close attention to.
Diabetes Warning Signs
The warning signs for diabetes can happen progressively or appear all of the sudden. Different types of diabetes may have similar indicators or very different ones.
Special attention should be paid to the following symptoms since they can indicate danger:
Extreme thirst
Dry mouth
Frequent urges to urinate
Hunger
Constant fatigue
Irritability
Blurry vision
Injuries that don’t scar or do so with difficulty
Itchy or dry skin
Constant fungal infections
Type 1 Diabetes Warning Signs
This type of diabetes is diagnosed generally in children and very young adults, even though it can happen to any age group.
Children tend to experience the following additional symptoms, so pay close attention:
Sudden and involuntary weigh Continue reading

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