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What's The Best Time Of Day To Eat Carbs If You Have Diabetes?

What's the Best Time of Day to Eat Carbs If You Have Diabetes?

What's the Best Time of Day to Eat Carbs If You Have Diabetes?


What's the Best Time of Day to Eat Carbs If You Have Diabetes?
Eating large amounts of carbs over time can limit your body's ability to metabolize them, especially if you have diabetes.
The following excerpt is adapted from the new book Master Your Diabetes: A Comprehensive, Integrative Approach for Both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes by Mona Morstein, ND (2017, Chelsea Green Publishing)
What exactly are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are biological molecules consisting of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms, but we also use the term as shorthand for foods that contain a lot of starches or sugars. People with diabetes need to be strict in eliminating high carbohydrate foods from their diets because even small amounts of these foods can pose big problems for regulating glucose levels. A low-carb diet means restricting carbohydrates to less than 45 grams per day, and even down to 20 grams per day, depending on your daily caloric intake.
Carbohydrates are listed on nutrition labels as total carbohydrates, fiber, and sugar. A diabetic patient reading a nutrition label only needs to take into account total carbohydrates minus fiber, as fiber is not absorbed into the body and so does not raise glucose levels. The result equals how many carbs will be absorbed by your intestine and affect your glucose level.
We do not focus on the sugar content of the label, because it is not helpful to us. If a label says each serving of food contains 19 grams of total carbohydrates, 1 gram of fiber, 4 grams of sugar, and a diabetic patient does not understand how to interpret that label, he might Continue reading

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diabetes: Gestational diabetes is a more serious problem in India than in other parts of the world: Dr Nam Han Cho, Health News, ET HealthWorld

diabetes: Gestational diabetes is a more serious problem in India than in other parts of the world: Dr Nam Han Cho, Health News, ET HealthWorld


New Delhi: Dr Nam Han Cho , president-elect of International Diabetes Federation ( IDF ), was recently in India to co-inaugurate Dr Mohans International Diabetes Update 2017. A world renowned diabetes epidemiologist, Dr Cho has published over 80 peer reviewed papers on type-1 & type-2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. He is also founder of the type-1 diabetes registry in Korea and is also responsible for estimating the prevalence of type 2 diabetes for the Korean population.
In an email interview with ETHealthworld, Dr Nam Han Cho provided insights on to the state of diabetes in India.
How do IDFs South East Asia regions function? What are your observations/findings in diabetes for India?
The South East Asia (SEA) region is one of the seven IDF regions. It is the most active region for promoting diabetes awareness and advocacy, providing patient & professional education and humanitarian support, hosting numerous international congresses for professionals, as well as conducting quality public health and clinically related diabetes researches.
Diabetes in India is a more serious problem than in other parts of the world. Indians stand at second highest number of people living with diabetes, especially highest in gestational diabetes in the world. A rapid economic growth, sedentary lifestyles and urbanization alter national culture and social structures, and eventually will put more people at high risk of diabetes in the future.
What do you have to say about high glycaemia cases in pregnancy? What are the solutions to such cases? How is the situation in India?
GDM (Ges Continue reading

Eating for Better Sleep

Eating for Better Sleep


Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise. Easy for Ben Franklin to say. According to the CDC, more than a third of Americans dont get enough sleep on a regular basis , let alone get to bed early. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society recommend that adults get at least 7 hours of sleep every night for optimal health and well-being. Yet getting sufficient sleep, along with quality sleep, continues to elude many of us.
Not getting enough sleep is certainly a nuisance. It leaves us feeling groggy, grumpy, and unfocused the next morning, making it hard to concentrate at work or school. And while poor performance at our jobs is nothing to take lightly, the reality is that there are serious health consequences from insufficient sleep. A higher risk of Type 2 diabetes , high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and obesity is linked to a lack of sleep. In addition, shortchanging yourself on sleep can affect your immune system, making you more susceptible to the flu, colds, and other infections.
Just last month, a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association revealed that people who had diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or obesity had double the chances of dying from heart disease or stroke compared to people without these risk factors if they got less than six hours of sleep each day. Having diabetes is already a risk factor for heart disease and stroke.
Gloomy news aside, there are steps you can take to help you sleep better. Many of these are related to lifestyle measures, and i Continue reading

The Rise of Diabetes

The Rise of Diabetes


30 years ago Vietnam suffered from widespread malnutrition. Now its type 2 diabetes that is affecting peoples health.
Inside a shopping mall on a Saturday afternoon in Tan Phu District, Ho Chi Minh City, several groups of Vietnamese children and their families are perched on plastic chairs eating burgers and fries and sipping fizzy drinks. Outside in the shade, a group of men take a smoke break from shopping. Its a sign of the times in Vietnam, and its a scene that reveals several red flags for diabetes.
The Vietnam Association of Diabetes and Endocrinology (VADE) recently reported that in Vietnam there are now 5 million diabetics, which accounts for around 5.4% of the population. Its believed that the real figure could be closer to 10%, after factoring in those who are living undiagnosed. Its an alarming rise from the figure of 3.3% just three years ago, and it means that Vietnam has one of the fastest- growing rates of diabetes in the world.
The main concern is type 2 diabetes, which used to be called Adult-Onset Diabetes before its rapid rise began to be charted in children. Unlike the genetic nature of type 1 diabetes, type 2 is characterised by lifestyle choices; eating refined sugars and flour, high-fructose corn syrup, heavily processed food, lack of dietary fibre and smoking. Fast-food outlets get most of the blame, but look around your local Family Mart or Circle K and see how much of the food and drink is quietly crammed with sugar.
The problem is stark; just 30 years ago, Vietnam was in the grip of malnutrition, and now it faces obesity and diabetes problem Continue reading

Predicting Atherosclerosis Disease in Patients With Diabetes

Predicting Atherosclerosis Disease in Patients With Diabetes


Home / Conditions / MODY/LADA / Predicting Atherosclerosis Disease in Patients With Diabetes
Predicting Atherosclerosis Disease in Patients With Diabetes
Carotid ultrasound shows atherosclerotic disease is not just a concern for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but LADA as well.
Approximately 4-14% of patients originally diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are reclassified as having latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA). It is well known that macrovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about the cardiovascular risks associated with patients diagnosed with LADA. Early diagnosis and treatment of carotid atherosclerosis greatly reduces a patients chances of experiencing a cardiovascular event. Although controversy surrounding the use of carotid ultrasound in the detection of preclinical atherosclerosis remains, it still proves to be a safe, non-invasive, and efficient way to evaluate the narrowing of the carotid arteries.
A recent cross-sectional analysis, published in Cardiovascular Diabetology, evaluated carotid atherosclerotic disease in patients with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and LADA. Researchers recruited 116 with type 1 diabetes, 191 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 71 patients with LADA. The study cohorts were similar in gender distribution, age, smoking status, HbA1c, and the use of antihypertensive medications. All study participants had a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio less than 300 mg/dg and an estimated glomerular filtration rate greater tha Continue reading

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