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What Your Not Supposed To Know About Recovering From Diabetes

What Your Not Supposed to Know About Recovering from Diabetes

What Your Not Supposed to Know About Recovering from Diabetes


What Your Not Supposed to Know About Recovering from Diabetes
Diabetes is considered to be one of the most common illnesses in western society. Nearly one in ten Americans have it, making it one of the most serious health epidemics of the 21st century.
The pancreas of a type 1 diabetic produces little to no insulin, which the body needs to carry glucose from the bloodstream to the cells of the body. This form is only found in about 5% of the population, and is usually diagnosed in children and teenagers. Typically, a type 1 diabetic will take frequent injections in order to maintain proper insulin levels in the body.
A type 2 diabetic has a similar problem. The most common form by far, type 2 diabetes is where the body does not know how to properly process insulin resulting in hyperglycemia, a rising of blood sugar levels beyond what is considered healthy.
At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time it isnt able to keep up and cant make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. ~American Diabetes Association
Some symptoms of diabetes include frequent urination, extreme hunger, sudden vision changes, dry skin and more.
Dietary Choices Found To Aid In Reversing Diabetes
In 2010, Diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in America , but it doesnt have to be, and scientists in the fields of natural medicine and nutrition have been working to find a cure.
In the documentary Simply Raw: Reversing Diabetes in 30 Days ,several patients with diabetes were given the challenge of dropping their regular diets and living Continue reading

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The 3 Stages of Type 1 Diabetes Development

The 3 Stages of Type 1 Diabetes Development


Home / The 3 Stages of Type 1 Diabetes Development
The 3 Stages of Type 1 Diabetes Development
Type 1 diabetes is a medical disorder characterized by the autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic islet cells, eventually leading to the absence of the production of insulin and other important hormones. The lack of insulin results in a decreased ability of glucose to enter the cells, leading to hyperglycemia , or high blood glucose levels.
Type 1 diabetes is believed to be caused by the combination of a genetic predisposition and an environmental trigger. Formerly known as juvenile diabetes, type 1 diabetes can be diagnosed in childhood, as well as in adulthood. In fact, between 25% and 50% of type 1 diabetes diagnoses today occur in individuals over 18 years old.
The main symptoms of untreated type 1 diabetes include:
Frequent infections and slow wound healing
Individuals with type 1 diabetes must monitor their blood glucose levels and administer exogenous insulin via injections or an insulin pump to allow for glucose metabolism. Left untreated, the condition is deadly and suboptimal management can result in numerous complications, including micro- and macrovascular problems in numerous organ systems as well as nerve damage. However, with optimal blood glucose control, the likelihood of complications can be minimized.
There are several main steps in the typical pattern of developing of type 1 diabetes:
Islet cell autoimmunity, characterized by the presence of autoantibodies,
A decrease in beta cell mass that reduces insulin production and results in slightly elevate Continue reading

Why Being Social Can Be Scary When You Have Chronic Illnesses

Why Being Social Can Be Scary When You Have Chronic Illnesses

Recently, my social life has been quite busy (unusual for me these days). My sister turned 50, my dad turned 80, a friend had a baby shower and I’ve had a number of other catch-ups with friends.
I work from home, but I also manage to get out of the house regularly with two different weekly exercise classes, two different monthly support group meetings, grocery shopping and various other bits and pieces. Nothing extraordinary there, I here you say. But wait! I also have rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia and type 2 diabetes along with other related conditions and side effects. These give me fluctuating and unpredictable levels of pain, strength and energy.
At home, I have routines that help keep these symptoms relatively stable. I have frequent rest breaks during the day. I don’t stand or walk for long periods and I wait until I feel up to it before attempting physical tasks like vacuuming. I also have control over the foods I eat so I avoid excess sugar, overly-processed foods, and gluten. (I don’t have celiac disease but I am trying it to see if it helps with my overall energy and vitality – so far, so good.)
A lot of that attempted stability disappears when I go out with others. Don’t get me wrong, I want to go out. I enjoy celebrating big events and seeing my friends.
But… There are always consequences.
Limited energy supply
Some of you may be familiar with the spoon theory. The idea behind it is that people with chronic illnesses only get a limited supply of energy (or spoons) each day. We have to ration our energy so it lasts until we go to bed. If we use t Continue reading

Broccoli Compound Lowers Risk of Obesity and Helps Treat Diabetes

Broccoli Compound Lowers Risk of Obesity and Helps Treat Diabetes


Broccoli Compound Lowers Risk of Obesity and Helps Treat Diabetes
Sulforaphane, an organic sulfur found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables, may lower your risk of obesity and may be an ideal substitute or complement to metformin in the treatment of type 2 diabetes
Sulforaphane reduces glucose production and improves liver gene expression. Patients with dysregulated diabetes who received broccoli sprout extract in addition to metformin had 10 percent lower fasting blood glucose levels than the placebo group
Broccoli and broccoli sprouts also have potent anticancer activity courtesy of sulforaphane and other chemoprotective compounds
Broccoli and broccoli sprouts have potent anticancer activity courtesy of sulforaphane , a naturally occurring organic sulfur, and other chemoprotective compounds. Studies have shown sulforaphane:
Supports normal cell function and division and acts as an immune stimulant 1
Causes apoptosis (programmed cell death) in colon, 2 prostate, 3 breast 4 and tobacco-induced lung cancer 5 cells; three servings of broccoli per week may reduce your risk of prostate cancer by more than 60 percent 6
Activates nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor that regulates cellular oxidation and reduction and aids in detoxification, 7 as well as other phase 2 detoxification enzymes.
Broccoli sprouts, in particular, have been shown to help detox environmental pollutants such as benzene. 8 , 9 , 10 In another study, sulforaphane was found to increase excretion of airborne pollutants by 61 percent. 11 The phytonutrients glu Continue reading

2 Things People With Type 1 Diabetes Can Learn From The Cancer & AIDS Community

2 Things People With Type 1 Diabetes Can Learn From The Cancer & AIDS Community


2 Things People With Type 1 Diabetes Can Learn From The Cancer & AIDS Community
Cancer is scary. Diabetes is scary. Chronic illness in general is scary. But each condition holds a different social connotation which is why Cancer & AIDS receive more funding, research, and general support from the government and the media than diabetes.
Diabetes is such a large, yet largely ignored, problem that it is almost difficult to comprehend. For that reason, here is some perspective, comparing AIDS, Diabetes, and Breast Cancer:
There are 29 million diagnosed cases of some type of diabetes in the USA. A speculated 79 million people are living with undiagnosed diabetes or prediabetes. If that doesnt get your attention, the cost associated with diabetes will.
While the American Cancer Society estimated costs of all cancers annual amounts to $201 billion, diabetes takes the cake (low-carb of course) with a staggering $245 billion annual impact. Not only are these costs associated with inhumanely astronomical health care prices of managing the chronic condition daily, the health care cost of diabetes isskyrocketing because of untreated diabetes.
Yet, you can hear a pin drop when it comes to diabetes advocacy in American (and most other countries) culture. Why is it that so much of the awareness, media attention, fundraising, and community support is mostly going to other justifiable causes like Cancer and AIDS but not diabetes? Is diabetes not that deadly? Clearly it is killing at a higher rate. Is diabetes not a big financial problem? Clearly it is bankrupting patients and the heal Continue reading

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