diabetestalk.net

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

What to Eat with Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

What to Eat with Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval.
Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared.
Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval.
Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared.
Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval.
Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared.
Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Enjoying the Best Grains for Diabetes – Your Healthy Kitchen

Enjoying the Best Grains for Diabetes – Your Healthy Kitchen

If you have diabetes, should you stop eating bread, rice and pasta? While everyone with diabetes (and pre-diabetes) benefits from eliminating processed grains from their diet (foods like white rice, cold cereals, white bread and snack foods), some individuals benefit from avoiding whole grain products as well. Others can lose weight and normalize blood sugar levels while still enjoying grains. However, if you eat grains, it’s important to be picky about the type and portion size of the grains you choose.
Individuals who have difficulty losing weight and controlling blood sugar levels sometimes benefit from eliminating all grains, including whole grains, from their diets for a while. Whole and processed grains contain an easily digested type of starch that can trigger spikes in blood sugar levels after meals, leading to weight gain and many of the complications of diabetes. Some people find that they can add whole grains back into their diets after they reach their weight and blood sugar goals.
Others with diabetes can maintain good health while still enjoying grains, but find that it is important to eat only whole grains, and in moderate quantities. Serving grains as a side dish, or about ¼ of a meal, is a helpful strategy that lends itself to healthy weight management and blood sugar control.
So what are whole grains and why are they nutritionally superior to processed grains? All true grains, including rice, wheat, barley and corn, are seeds that come from different types of grasses. A whole grain consists of three basic components: an outer layer called the bran, a st Continue reading

Statin Drugs Linked with Parkinson's Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes

Statin Drugs Linked with Parkinson's Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes

"Scientists concluded that statin medications were associated with a higher risk of Parkinson's disease."
Despite their success as multi-billion dollar cholesterol medications, statins have been shown to increase the risk of the neurodegenerative disease Parkinson's. The list of statin drug-induced disorders also includes diabetes, cataracts, liver and kidney failure, memory loss, muscle damage, pneumonia and immune suppression. These are all a heavy price to pay for the drug management of cholesterol. While not everyone experiences these adverse effects, it should pose some serious questions about the ubiquitous use of these meds and the desire to put everyone on them. More important, it hopefully propels you into a direction of self-empowerment with health management.
[Jump to: Nutritional Options]
Statins and Parkinson's Disease
The reports of Parkinson's disease associated with cholesterol lowering statin medications have been making subdued headlines for a few years. Recently, studies have made significant headline news that challenges the dogma that statins help prevent and reduce the risk of Parkinson’s disease. The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society and the June 2017 Movement Disorders journal published a retrospective case-controlled study. After a large database analysis, scientists concluded that statin medications, especially lipophilic statins like Lipitor were associated with higher risk of Parkinson’s disease. The greatest risk of the disease developing occurred within a year, after starting the medication. Those who were on the lipophi Continue reading

Why the Glycemic Index Fails for Many People with Diabetes

Why the Glycemic Index Fails for Many People with Diabetes

As simple as it seems, most doctors and dietitians still don't tell people with diabetes that the carbohydrate content of the food they eat is what raises their blood sugar and that lowering their carbohydrate intake will lower their blood sugar.
Instead, they recommend the so called "good carbs" which are those which are low on the "Glycemic Index," chief of which are what they call "Healthy whole grains," like whole wheat bread, brown rice, pasta, and oatmeal.
If you look any of these foods up in your handy carb counter--you DO have a carb counter, I hope!--you will see they all contain a lot of carbohydrate. Two ounces of whole wheat bread--one thin slice--generally contain around 29 grams of carbohydrate and how many people only eat one slice?
A single ounce of dry oatmeal contains 18 grams, but what most people consider a full serving is at least twice that size. Two ounces of low glycemic pasta contain around 56 grams of carb, but again, two ounces is a very small amount--about 1/3 of what most people consider a normal portion of pasta.
If you measure your blood sugar for several hours after eating a normal serving of whole wheat bread or oatmeal you will see a spike, possibly a very high spike well over 200 mg/dl. You may have to measure your blood sugar 4 hours after eating pasta to see the spike it causes because of how slowly it digests, but eventually it does digest, and if you keep testing you will see it cause a spike, too.
So what's going on here?
The answer is that the glycemic index only works for people who have a normal second phase insulin response. If yo Continue reading

Should You Eat Cereal for Breakfast If You Have Diabetes?

Should You Eat Cereal for Breakfast If You Have Diabetes?

We've heard countless times that breakfast is the most important meal of the day—it can help jump start metabolism, prevent food cravings, and help people lose weight. The most common complaint of "non breakfast eaters" is that they don't have time in the morning to eat and that they are looking for quick breakfast ideas. Therefore, people often ask me, "Can I eat cold cereal for breakfast?" While it's probably better to eat something for breakfast than nothing at all, cold cereal is typically not the best choice for someone with diabetes who is trying to lose weight.
The reason is multifactorial.
First off, studies have shown that those persons with diabetes tend to have better blood sugars and weight control when starting the day with a higher fat, higher protein, lower carbohydrate breakfast. Protein and fat tend to be more satiating which can keep you feel full for longer, typically resulting in less overall calorie intake. In addition, blood sugars tend to rise higher after breakfast and many people are resistant to insulin in the morning which can also cause blood sugars to spike. Elevated blood sugars may cause additional carbohydrate cravings, which can lead to excess calorie and carbohydrate intake, often resulting in excess sugar in the blood.
Secondly, many people overeat cereal which can lead to excess calorie and carbohydrate intake. A single serving of cereal is about 3/4 cup. Three-fourths cup of cereal will generally cost you about 120 calories and 24 g of carbohydrate.
This amount of carbohydrates is equivalent to eating almost 2 slices of bread and this Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • Got pre-diabetes? Here’s five things to eat or avoid to prevent type 2 diabetes

    Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk. Diabetes Prevention Programs Studies arou ...

  • Got pre-diabetes? Here's five things to eat or avoid to prevent type 2 diabetes

    Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk. Diabetes Prevention Programs Studies arou ...

  • How Much Should I Eat Daily To Control My Blood Sugar Levels With Diabetes?

    The types of food you eat, when you eat them, the timing of medications and even physical activity levels can all affect blood sugar levels. A good component to type 2 diabetes management is keeping your blood sugar levels under control as best as possible. The road to management can be a challenging and winding one. The day-to-day efforts you put in trying to ensure you maintain your target blood ...

  • The 2-Day Diabetes Diet: What to Eat to Lose Weight

    For folks with diabetes, weight loss is a natural form of “medication.” Reams of research prove that losing even just a few pounds is an effective way to control blood sugar or reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first place. But in an ironic twist, losing weight may be more difficult if you have type 2 diabetes. And the reason isn’t just a lack of willpower. Too often, diet ...

  • What Fruit Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes?

    You may have heard at some point that you cannot eat fruit if you have diabetes. Perhaps someone even told you that watermelon and bananas are off limits because they are too sweet. Neither of these is entirely true. You can enjoy fruit, you simply need to make smart decisions about which fruits and how much you eat. Fruits and Diabetes Fruits have many health benefits and they can be beneficial t ...

  • Can people with type 2 diabetes eat honey?

    People with diabetes are often told they should not eat sweets and other foods that contain sugar because they may cause a spike in blood sugar levels. So, could honey be a healthful alternative to sugar-filled sweets and snacks? Blood sugar (glucose) levels are the amounts of sugar found in the blood. Sugar is the body's primary source of energy. Insulin is secreted from the pancreas to maintain ...

  • Can people with diabetes eat popcorn?

    Popcorn can be a healthful snack for most people, depending on how it is prepared. With its fairly low calorie and high-fiber content, air popped popcorn is often a go-to snack for dieters. However, people with diabetes have more to worry about than their waistlines when snacking on popcorn. People with diabetes can eat popcorn but need to choose carefully the type of popcorn, how it is cooked, an ...

  • 7 Good Carbs for Diabetes Nutritionists Want You to Eat

    Healthy carb: Oatmeal iStock/Magone Eating oats (the kind without added sugar) can slightly lower both fasting blood sugar levels and HbA1c, a three-month measure of blood-sugar levels, shows a review study by Beijing scientists. Have ½ cup cooked. Make a savory oatmeal: Top with a soft-cooked egg and mushrooms and onions sautéed in low-sodium vegetable broth. Healthy carb: Sweet potato iStock/m ...

  • Can You Eat Ginger If You Have Diabetes?

    Diabetes is a metabolic condition that some people are born with and others may develop over time. It affects the way people produce or respond to insulin, which in turn affects the way your body processes sugar. Because of this, it’s important to take note of what you’re eating and how it may impact your blood sugar levels. Ginger, for example, is low in carbohydrates and calories. It has onl ...

Related Articles