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What To Eat If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

What to Eat if You Have Type 2 Diabetes

What to Eat if You Have Type 2 Diabetes

If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you’re probably wondering what to eat to keep your blood sugar levels in check. The good news is you don’t have to give up your favorite foods. A diabetes diet, like most healthy diets, is all about controlling portions and consuming a wide array of vegetables, fresh fruits, whole grains, nuts and seeds, lean protein, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats.
Watch Your Carb Intake
When managing type 2 diabetes, it’s important to understand that not all foods are created equal: Some will affect your blood sugar levels more than others. Carbohydrates, in particular, break down into glucose quickly, which spikes your blood sugar levels. Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables. “In general, carbohydrates should be limited to approximately 30 to 60 grams (g) per meal to prevent high blood glucose levels,” says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, a certified diabetes educator in Franklin, New Jersey. Once you’ve learned to manage your carb portions, try balancing your meals with lean protein and healthy fats, which digest slowly and keep your blood sugar steady after meals.
Use the Healthy Plate Method
So what does a healthy diabetes diet look like? It’s simple, says Palinski-Wade. Just use the healthy plate method: Fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables (like spinach, carrots, and other greens), a quarter of your plate with lean protein (such as grilled chicken, fish, lean beef, or pork), and a quarter of your plate with starchy foods (like whole grain Continue reading

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What is Type 2 Diabetes and what causes it?
Briefly; Type 2 diabetes is a malfunctioning state of the sugar (glucose) regulation and distribution in the body. It was extremely rare in the first part of the 20th century and is very clearly a result of modern food processing that deviates from the traditional food and agricultural systems.
There are a number of long term ‘insults’ to the body that produce Type 2 diabetes. The main insults being the change to processed fats and oils and the excesses of refined sugar and refined carbohydrates in the modern processed diet.
To make Turmeric 'Golden Paste'
To 50g of powdered turmeric add 100 ml of warm water and stir to a paste in a saucepan while gently heating continuously for about 5 minutes. Turn off the heat and stir in 1 or more teaspoons of finely ground black pepper and/or Chilli Powder (this helps to drive the turmeric to where it is needed) and finally add 10 ml of coconut oil. Will keep in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.
Avoiding all sources of processed fats and oils is another essential step. Avoid frying or roasting any food with fats; such as meat, eggs, and fish as the naturally occurring fats can be damaged. Replace fats with raw unheated coconut oil, butter, hemp oil and some virgin olive oil. In the early stages of recovery keep butter and olive oil low and take coconut oil in raw thera Continue reading

Type 2 diabetes REVERSED: Removing bread and pasta from diets could be cure

Type 2 diabetes REVERSED: Removing bread and pasta from diets could be cure

They say slashing consumption of rice, potatoes and sugar has the potential to halt one of Britain’s biggest health epidemics.Switching to a healthier lifestyle could save the cash-strapped NHS £10 billion a year - the amount spent treating the condition - and change people’s lives in just 12 months.
New data from Diabetes.co.uk, the world’s largest community of sufferers, reveals 7,000 Type 2 patients using a low refined carbohydrate dietary programme saved £6.9 million on medication in a year.
The startling statistics are revealed in a new book published today which aims to make millions of Britons happier and healthier.
Fri, August 19, 2016
Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition.
Consultant cardiologist and co-author Dr Aseem Malhotra said: “Extrapolate this across the UK population suffering with Type 2 and we could save hundreds of millions in the use of medication alone.”He added: “Type 2 is a condition you want to avoid at all costs.
Simple diet changes have rapid and substantial benefits not just for patients with Type 2 but for high blood pressure and heart disease too
"Not only does it significantly increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure and reduce life expectancy by up to 15 years but more than half of patients report chronic pain at levels similar to those with terminal cancer and a quarter suffer from depression, fatigue, sleep disturbance physical and emotional disability.
“The good n Continue reading

Diabetes and Exercise: How to Organize Your Workouts for Better Results

Diabetes and Exercise: How to Organize Your Workouts for Better Results

If you have diabetes, you probably already know that you need to take precautions during exercise to help protect your feet and maintain stable blood sugar levels. But did you know that the type of workout you pick — along with how you organize that workout — could actually affect your blood sugar levels as well?
The Benefits of Physical Fitness for Type 2 Diabetes
“Exercise is a key diabetes self-management strategy, primarily because it can help reduce insulin resistance and lowers blood sugar levels,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a health, food, and fitness coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health.
And the way that exercise affects your blood sugar depends on whether that exercise is aerobic or anaerobic, says Christine Mueller, RD, a nutrition specialist at the Adult Diabetes Education Program at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Aerobic exercise uses large muscle groups in a repeated fashion for a sustained period of time, according to the Cleveland Clinic, while anaerobic exercise is intense physical activity of short duration. Examples of aerobic exercise include walking or jogging, and weight lifting falls under anaerobic exercise, Mueller explains.
“The reason is that we store glucose — what we use for energy — in our muscles and in our liver,” Mueller says. “And when we start doing a more intense exercise, like anaerobic exercise, the body says that it needs the energy right now, and dumps all the stored glucose in the blood.” That temporarily leads to a higher blood sugar. Meanwhile, low-intensity aerobic a Continue reading

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Epidemologist Nick Wareham on the discovery of insulin, clinical diagnostic tests for diabetes, and the thrifty metabolism hypothesis
The video is a part of the project British Scientists produced in collaboration between Serious Science and the British Council.
The diabetes is a cluster of metabolic conditions all characterized by hypoglycemia, or raised blood glucose levels. This occurs in the face of absolute or relative insulin deficiency. Insulin is the key hormone secreted by the pancreas that modifies the glucose levels in the blood. And glucose has to be kept within a very tight range: too high – and we get complications related to the metabolic effects of glucose particularly in the small vessels of the body (the eyes, the feet) and also the large vessels like the heart itself. Too low – and we get problems of low glucose related to problems in the brain. So it’s kept in a very tight homeostatic range. When this gets out of control to the high level that is what the problem of diabetes is.
Now, until the early part of the 20th century, all diabetes was considered to be the same. In fact, it comes from a Greek word meaning – diabetes means the siphon. That term is used because it characterized by excess of urine and too much water flowing out of the body as a consequence of the high glucose levels. And the other word is ‘mellitus’ meaning sweet. So, originally the diagnosis was made by characterizing the urine as tasting sweet, because glucose was lost in the urine. And in the early part of the 20th century, our understanding of diabetes changed, when in Continue reading

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