diabetestalk.net

What To Eat For Hypoglycemia

What to eat for hypoglycemia

What to eat for hypoglycemia

In this article, we list meal plans for people with hypoglycemia, as well as other tips for managing the condition.
What is hypoglycemia?
People with persistent low blood sugar may have hypoglycemia. Having low blood sugar is often associated with diabetes, but it is possible to experience hypoglycemia without having diabetes.
Other common causes include hormonal deficiencies, critical illnesses, and excessive alcohol consumption.
When blood sugar drops within 4 hours of eating a meal, a person may be experiencing reactive hypoglycemia. This condition is caused by excessive insulin production after eating.
Hypoglycemia symptoms including:
trembling
feeling weak or faint
feeling mentally sluggish
confusion
feeling tearful
heart palpitations
turning pale
blurred sight
tingling lips
Breakfast
A person should always try to eat breakfast as soon as possible after waking up, as blood sugar levels may have dropped during the night.
It is advisable to limit intake of fruit juices in the morning and stick to juices that do not have added sugar, as these may cause blood sugar levels to become unstable.
Some ideal breakfast choices include:
Cinnamon is thought to help reduce blood sugar levels and can be sprinkled on many breakfast foods.
Lunch
Lunch should be a small meal but packed with protein, healthful fats, and complex carbohydrates that will continue to release energy slowly.
Some good lunch ideas for hypoglycemia are:
tuna, chicken, or tofu sandwich on whole-grain bread with salad leaves
chickpea and vegetable salad
grilled fish, a baked sweet potato, and a side salad
It is ne Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Meta-analysis discovers repletion of vitamin D deficiency may help type II diabetes

Meta-analysis discovers repletion of vitamin D deficiency may help type II diabetes

A new meta-analysis discovered that the repletion of vitamin D deficiency may lead to HbA1C reductions among type II diabetes patients.
Diabetes is responsible for over 75,000 deaths each year in the U.S, making it the seventh leading cause of death. Approximately 29.1 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, with type 2 diabetes accounting for about 90 to 95 percent of adult cases.
Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition, in which the body resists the effects of insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar level.
Insulin is a hormone made by pancreatic beta cells that regulates the body’s blood sugar level. Insulin secretion into the bloodstream enables sugar to enter the cells. This lowers the amount of sugar in the bloodstream.
Researchers propose that vitamin D may help diabetes by stimulating insulin secretion via the vitamin D receptors in the pancreas, lowering inflammation and thereby improving insulin resistance or improving insulin resistance through the vitamin D receptors in the muscles and liver.
Observational studies have established a clear relationship between low vitamin D levels and diabetes. However, whether vitamin D supplementation improves glycemic control is still up for debate. In an effort to resolve this argument, researchers recently conducted a meta-analysis of 22 randomized controlled trials that assessed the effects of vitamin D supplementation on glucose metabolism, specifically HbA1c and fasting blood glucose. HbA1c is a lab test that shows the average blood sugar (glucose) level over the previous three month Continue reading

Abbott Secures Health Canada License for FreeStyle Libre System for People with Diabetes

Abbott Secures Health Canada License for FreeStyle Libre System for People with Diabetes


Abbott Secures Health Canada License for FreeStyle Libre System for People with Diabetes
- REVOLUTIONARY SYSTEM ELIMINATES THE NEED FOR ROUTINE FINGER STICKS1 AND FINGER STICK CALIBRATION
- PROVIDES REAL-TIME GLUCOSE LEVELS FOR UP TO 14 DAYS
- WILL BE REIMBURSED BY TWO MAJOR CANADIAN INSURERS; AVAILABLE IN THE COMING MONTHS ACROSS CANADA
ABBOTT PARK, Ill., June 29, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Abbott (NYSE: ABT ) today announced the Health Canada license of its FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, a revolutionary new glucose sensing technology for Canadian adults with diabetes. The first-of-its-kind system eliminates the need for routine finger sticks,1 requires no finger stick calibration, and reads glucose levels through a sensor that can be worn on the back of the upper arm for up to 14 days.
FreeStyle Libre system eliminates the need for routine finger sticks(1), requires no routine finger stick calibration, and reads glucose levels through a sensor worn on the back of the upper arm for up to 14 days. The disposable sensor, the size of a quarter, is worn on the back of the upper arm. The sensor can read glucose levels through clothing, making testing more convenient and discreet.
FreeStyle Libre system eliminates the need for routine finger sticks(1), requires no routine finger stick calibration, and reads glucose levels through a sensor worn on the back of the upper arm for up to 14 days. The disposable sensor, the size of a quarter, is worn on the back of the upper arm. The sensor can read glucose levels through clothing, making testing more convenient and Continue reading

Type 1 Diabetes Risk May Come Down to Gut Bacteria Counts

Type 1 Diabetes Risk May Come Down to Gut Bacteria Counts


Read Stomach Bacteria Could be an Early Type 1 Detector.
Some scientists decided to test whether the environmental conditions at the differing labs affected the rate of non-obese diabetes in the mice, according to Dr. Aleksander Kostic, an assistant investigator at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. They raised the mice in a completely sterile, germ-free environment, and found that the rate of non-obese diabetes quickly climbed upwards. They then transferred stool from mice raised in a non-sterile environment to mice raised in a sterile environment, and noticed that the rate of diabetes for the mice who received the transplanted stool went down.
This seemed to indicate that a lack of exposure to microbes was somehow having a severely detrimental effect on the immune system and preventing protection from Type 1 diabetes to mice that were genetically prone, Dr. Kostic said in a phone interview with Insulin Nation.
Read Why People with Type 1 Have Stomach Problems.
Findings like these have given rise to the hygiene hypothesis. This theory supposes that our immune systems are genetically designed to handle a certain load of exposure to microbes. As societys hygiene has improved, it has left the immune system with not enough to do, the theory goes, and it becomes more prone to attacking the body. This could have led to a rise in autoimmune diseases like Type 1 diabetes.
With this theory in mind, Dr. Kostic and others have observed that gut bacteria becomes less diverse in people with Type 1 a year before diagnosis. The guts of people with Type 1 become dominated by several Continue reading

Diabetes: Stimulating bone stem cells may improve fracture repair

Diabetes: Stimulating bone stem cells may improve fracture repair


Diabetes: Stimulating bone stem cells may improve fracture repair
Researchers have discovered a protein that stimulates bone stem cells in mice with diabetes so that the animals heal better after a fracture. They suggest that this could lead to a new treatment to improve bone repair in people with diabetes.
Bones of normal mice (top) form larger calluses during healing, which lead to stronger repair. However, bones of diabetic mice (bottom) have smaller calluses, which lead to more brittle healed bones.
The team, from Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, CA, reports the findings in the journal Science Translational Medicine.
Michael T. Longaker, a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery and one of the study's senior authors, sums up the work:
"We've uncovered the reason why some patients with diabetes don't heal well from fractures, and we've come up with a solution that can be locally applied during surgery to repair the break."
Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the body's ability to produce or respond to insulin - a hormone that regulates blood sugar - is impaired.
Raised blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes, and over time it can cause serious damage in many parts of the body, including the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves.
Today, there are more than 420 million people with diabetes worldwide - nearly four times as many as there were in 1980 (108 million).
Problematic bone healing is one of the many health complications that people with diabetes experience; following a break Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • Can diabetics eat bananas?

    When a person has diabetes, they need to carefully consider the contents of each meal. This can be especially true for carbohydrate-containing food, which not only includes desserts and other sweet treats, but bread, pasta, and fresh fruits. One fruit that traditionally has been on the "avoid" list for those with diabetes is bananas. However, for the most part, bananas eaten in moderation can be s ...

  • Can diabetics eat watermelon?

    Like all fruits, watermelon contains plenty of natural sugar. While watermelon is usually safe for someone with diabetes to eat as part of their diet, how much and how often they can do so depends on several factors. People with diabetes are aware of the need to educate themselves about the right kinds of foods to eat to maintain stable blood sugar levels. Eating a diet high in fruit and vegetable ...

  • Can Type 1 Diabetics Eat Sugar Free Candy?

    There are always questions asked as to what a diabetic patient should or should not include in his or her daily diet. Diabetes is complicated and as such, it is very natural to be skeptical about adding a particular food product in your meal plan. Today’s discussion revolves around the inclusion of the so-called sugar-free candies in the meal plan of a type 1 diabetic patient. So, join in for th ...

  • The Best and Worst Fruits to Eat If You Have Diabetes

    Good news for fruit lovers everywhere: eating fresh fruit is associated with a lower risk of diabetes and a lower risk of complications if you already have the disease, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. Featured recipe: Fresh Fruit Salad If you've been steering clear of fruit because of the sugar content, there's no reason to do so, according to this study. Over a seven-year tim ...

  • What Fruit Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes?

    You may have heard at some point that you cannot eat fruit if you have diabetes. Perhaps someone even told you that watermelon and bananas are off limits because they are too sweet. Neither of these is entirely true. You can enjoy fruit, you simply need to make smart decisions about which fruits and how much you eat. Fruits and Diabetes Fruits have many health benefits and they can be beneficial t ...

  • Can people with type 2 diabetes eat honey?

    People with diabetes are often told they should not eat sweets and other foods that contain sugar because they may cause a spike in blood sugar levels. So, could honey be a healthful alternative to sugar-filled sweets and snacks? Blood sugar (glucose) levels are the amounts of sugar found in the blood. Sugar is the body's primary source of energy. Insulin is secreted from the pancreas to maintain ...

  • Can people with diabetes eat popcorn?

    Popcorn can be a healthful snack for most people, depending on how it is prepared. With its fairly low calorie and high-fiber content, air popped popcorn is often a go-to snack for dieters. However, people with diabetes have more to worry about than their waistlines when snacking on popcorn. People with diabetes can eat popcorn but need to choose carefully the type of popcorn, how it is cooked, an ...

  • 7 Good Carbs for Diabetes Nutritionists Want You to Eat

    Healthy carb: Oatmeal iStock/Magone Eating oats (the kind without added sugar) can slightly lower both fasting blood sugar levels and HbA1c, a three-month measure of blood-sugar levels, shows a review study by Beijing scientists. Have ½ cup cooked. Make a savory oatmeal: Top with a soft-cooked egg and mushrooms and onions sautéed in low-sodium vegetable broth. Healthy carb: Sweet potato iStock/m ...

  • Can You Eat Ginger If You Have Diabetes?

    Diabetes is a metabolic condition that some people are born with and others may develop over time. It affects the way people produce or respond to insulin, which in turn affects the way your body processes sugar. Because of this, it’s important to take note of what you’re eating and how it may impact your blood sugar levels. Ginger, for example, is low in carbohydrates and calories. It has onl ...

Related Articles