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What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

Through twenty-five years of working with people with diabetes, when they come in for diabetes education, their first question is most often “What can I eat (or drink).” The next question is often, “What can’t I eat (or drink)? In this article, we will explore what foods are best to eat when you have just been diagnosed with Pre-Diabetes, and Type 2 Diabetes, and what foods are best avoided.
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There is no other guide available on the internet that will guide you through the best foods to choose, and the best foods to avoid. Take heed, as some foods in the American diet are detrimental. These are also the same foods that Americans are addicted to.
On occasion, you will be able to eat from the foods to avoid list, such as on a holiday, or your birthday. It shouldn’t become a regular occurrence to eat foods that are best avoided if you have Pre-Diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes. Also, eating healthier throughout your lifespan, can prevent Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes from ever surfacing at all.
Starting to eat a healthy diet can help you to reverse your Pre-Diabetes, along with regular physical activity, and sometimes medication (most often Metformin). You can either get Type 2 Diabetes in good control, or you can reverse it to a Pre-Diabetes state in some cases, if you work on healthy lifestyle changes.
Though it’s not always possible to reverse Type 2 Diabetes, it is certainly worth a shot. My new book to come out soon, entitled, “The Practical Guide for the Reversal of Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes,” published b Continue reading

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Thawing Out That Frozen Shoulder

Thawing Out That Frozen Shoulder

Having trouble reaching behind your back? Do you struggle to button your shirt or tie your necktie? Does your shoulder hurt more at night while you’re trying to sleep? Is your golf game suffering because of shoulder pain? If so, you might be experiencing a painful — yet common — condition called adhesive capsulitis, also known as “frozen shoulder.” Read on to learn more about it, including treatment options.
What is frozen shoulder?
Frozen shoulder is a condition that causes pain and stiffness in your shoulder joint. Over time, the ability to move your shoulder is reduced, and it may get to the point where your shoulder literally becomes “frozen.” Frozen shoulder is not the same thing as arthritis, however.
Your shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint, much like your hip joint. The joint is covered by a capsule of ligaments. When frozen shoulder occurs, it means that the capsule and ligaments swell and become tight, making it difficult — or even impossible — to move your shoulder.
Who’s at risk for frozen shoulder?
People between the ages of 40 and 60 are more likely to have frozen shoulder, and this condition affects women more than men. In addition, you have a higher risk of it if you’ve had the following:
• Rotator cuff injury
• Broken arm
• Stroke
• Shoulder injury
• Surgery
Certain medical conditions also increase the likelihood of frozen shoulder, including:
• Diabetes
• Thyroid disease (under- or overactive thyroid)
• Heart conditions
• Parkinson’s disease
• Tuberculosis
• Hormonal changes
As you can see, having diabete Continue reading

Management of Inpatient Hyperglycemia and Diabetes in Older Adults

Management of Inpatient Hyperglycemia and Diabetes in Older Adults

Adults aged 65 years and older are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population, and their number is expected to double to 89 million between 2010 and 2050. The prevalence of diabetes in hospitalized adults aged 65–75 years and over 80 years of age has been estimated to be 20% and 40%, respectively. Similar to general populations, the presence of hyperglycemia and diabetes in elderly patients is associated with increased risk of hospital complications, longer length of stay, and increased mortality compared with subjects with normoglycemia. Clinical guidelines recommend target blood glucose between 140 and 180 mg/dL (7.8 and 10 mmol/L) for most patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). A similar blood glucose target is recommended for patients in non-ICU settings; however, glycemic targets should be individualized in older adults on the basis of a patient’s clinical status, risk of hypoglycemia, and presence of diabetes complications. Insulin is the preferred agent to manage hyperglycemia and diabetes in the hospital. Continuous insulin infusion in the ICU and rational use of basal-bolus or basal plus supplement regimens in non-ICU settings are effective in achieving glycemic goals. Noninsulin regimens with the use of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors alone or in combination with basal insulin have been shown to be safe and effective and may represent an alternative to basal-bolus regimens in elderly patients. Smooth transition of care to the outpatient setting is facilitated by providing oral and written instructions regarding timing and dosing of insulin as wel Continue reading

What’s the Best Diet for Diabetes? An Expert Weighs In

What’s the Best Diet for Diabetes? An Expert Weighs In

Diabetes is quickly becoming a world health issue, with the prevalence of the condition among adults rising from 4.7 percent in 1980 to 8.5 percent in 2014. In the U.S. the numbers are even more staggering—1 in 11 Americans has diabetes, and nearly half of kids and adults are at risk. One of the best ways you can help reduce your risk or manage your symptoms is through healthy eating, and in the Diabetes (Type 1) and Diabetes (Type 2) groups in the Fitbit app, community members are sharing support and encouragement. One of the biggest questions they’re currently discussing: “what’s the best diet for diabetes?” “Healthy eating for diabetes is healthy eating for everybody,” says Sacha Uelmen, Director of Nutrition for the American Diabetes Association. “But we never recommend one specific plan, because the best diet for you is so personal, from your family to your finances.”
The usual healthy eating advice still applies. (Hint: Eat more veggies! Avoid processed foods!) But with diabetes, there is more to keep in mind. The immediate priority is to manage your blood glucose levels, and if you have type 2 diabetes, your doctor may recommend you set a long-term goal to lose weight. To do both, you have to understand carbs and calories, and start timing your meals and snacks evenly throughout the day. Here are a three different approaches.
The Plate Method
“Start with your plate,” says Uelmen. “That’s a super easy visual, and the first and best thing everyone can do is eat more veggies.” The method involves filling half of your plate with non-starchy ve Continue reading

Do Statins Raise Odds for Type 2 Diabetes?

Do Statins Raise Odds for Type 2 Diabetes?

TUESDAY, Oct. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins may lower your risk of heart disease, but also might boost the odds you'll develop type 2 diabetes, new research suggests.
"In a group of people at high risk of type 2 diabetes, statins do seem to increase the risk of developing diabetes by about 30 percent," said the study's lead author, Dr. Jill Crandall. She's a professor of medicine and director of the diabetes clinical trials unit at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City.
But, she added, that doesn't mean anyone should give up on statins.
"The benefits of statins in terms of cardiovascular risk are so strong and so well established that our recommendation isn't that people should stop taking statins, but people should be monitored for the development of diabetes while on a statin," she explained.
At least one other diabetes expert agreed that statins are still beneficial for those at risk of heart trouble.
Dr. Daniel Donovan Jr. is professor of medicine and director of clinical research at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism Institute in New York City.
"We still need to give statins when LDL (bad) cholesterol isn't under control. A statin intervention can lower the risk of a cardiovascular event by 40 percent, and it's possible the diabetes may have been destined to happen," he said.
The new study is an analysis of data collected from another ongoing study. More than 3,200 adults were recruited from 27 diabetes centers across the United States for the study.
The research g Continue reading

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