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Weight Watchers Jumps Eight Spots To #3 Best Diabetes Diet And Retains Top Spot As Best Fast Weight Loss Diet In 2018 Best Diets Report

Weight Watchers Jumps Eight Spots To #3 Best Diabetes Diet And Retains Top Spot As Best Fast Weight Loss Diet In 2018 Best Diets Report

Weight Watchers Jumps Eight Spots To #3 Best Diabetes Diet And Retains Top Spot As Best Fast Weight Loss Diet In 2018 Best Diets Report


Weight Watchers Jumps Eight Spots To #3 "Best Diabetes Diet" And Retains Top Spot As "Best Fast Weight Loss Diet" In 2018 Best Diets Report
Annual Rankings Released Today by U.S. News & World Report Indicate Weight Watchers is One of the Best Plans Available
NEW YORK, Jan. 3, 2018 /PRNewswire/ --Weight Watchers International, Inc. (NYSE: WTW ) has been recognized once again by health experts in the 2018 Best Diets rankings released today by U.S. News & World Report, which includes advancing to #3 for "Best Diabetes Diet" (up from #11 in 2017). The "Best Diabetes Diets" ranking evaluates plans based on their ability to both prevent and manage the disease. Recent research has demonstrated the benefits of Weight Watchers programs for both prediabetes and diabetes. Specifically, clinical trial participants showed significant reductions in both weight and blood sugar control1,2,3.
Weight Watchers also received top recognition in six additional categories:
Ranked #1 for "Best Fast Weight-Loss Diet" for the second consecutive year since the category was added in 2016
Ranked #1 for "Best Weight-Loss Diet" for the eighth consecutive year
Ranked #1 for "Best Commercial Diet Plan" for the eighth consecutive year
Ranked #5 for "Best Diet for Healthy Living"
"For nearly 55 years, Weight Watchers has been known for taking the latest science and making it actionable and livable for our members. We are leaders because our science-based, proven program consistently inspires healthy habits for real life," said Gary Foster, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer, Weight Watchers Internationa Continue reading

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Key Points from the Updated Guidelines on Exercise and Diabetes

Key Points from the Updated Guidelines on Exercise and Diabetes


Key Points from the Updated Guidelines on Exercise and Diabetes
1Human Movement Sciences Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA
Edited by: Jonathan Peter Little, University of British Columbia, Canada
Reviewed by: Normand Boule, University of Alberta, Canada; Jamie F. Burr, University of Guelph, Canada
*Correspondence: Sheri R. Colberg, [email protected]
Specialty section: This article was submitted to Diabetes, a section of the journal Frontiers in Endocrinology
Received 2017 Jan 14; Accepted 2017 Feb 7.
Keywords: physical activity, exercise, diabetes, guidelines, American Diabetes Association
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
No doubt remains that the adoption and maintenance of physical activity is important for overall health and blood glucose management in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. Recently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) published updated recommendations and precautions about physical activity and exercise in people with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes ( 1 ). Given the importance of these topics, it is worth discussing the key changes and updates included in this ADA position statement (PS).
Pre-Ex Continue reading

Study suggests link between A1 beta-casein and type 1diabetes

Study suggests link between A1 beta-casein and type 1diabetes


Posted on October 31, 2017 by Keith Woodford
[The article below was intended to be published some weeks back at The Conversation. The Conversation is the online portal, funded by Universities in Australia, New Zealand and the UK, where academics are encouraged to communicate and converse with non-academics. However, this particular article was blocked at the last minute by the Senior Editor(s) at The Conversation, having previously been approved within their editorial system. The Senior Editor(s) felt that the interests of associated commercial parties, who might benefit from dissemination of the article, were too great. A fuller story of that publishing saga will be posted shortly.
The content, formatting and supporting links are shown as originally agreed with The Conversation and reflect the prior input of one of their editors. This article can be freely republished, with or withut this foreword, but retaining the title as posted here, and with acknowledgements as to source [https://keithwoodford.wordpress.com].
Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, is on the rise globally.
Early evidence of an association between type 1 diabetes and a protein in cow milk, known as A1 beta-casein, was published in 2003 . However, the notion that the statistically strong association could be causal has remained controversial.
As part of a seven-person team, we have reviewed the overall evidence that links A1 beta-casein to type 1 diabetes. Our research brings forward new ways of looking at that evidence.
Type 1 diabetes i Continue reading

Cancer and Diabetes: More Connections Than You Think

Cancer and Diabetes: More Connections Than You Think


Cancer and Diabetes: More Connections Than You Think
Many people struggle with both diabetes and cancer at the same time.
As youve probably heard by now, City of Hope recently announced its goal to cure type 1 diabetes within six years, made possible in part through a generous gift from the Wanek family.
Theannouncement raises a natural question:
Why should City of Hope, a renowned cancer center, devote so much time, effort and resources to the study and treatment of diabetes? Aren't they very different diseases?
To begin with, a great many people struggle with both diabetes and cancer at the same time.
People with type 2 diabetes (the most common form) are twice as likely to develop liver or pancreatic cancer. They also run a higher-than-normal risk of developing colon, bladder and breast cancer. Diabetic women with breast cancer have a higher mortality rate than women with breast cancer alone. (Oddly, diabetic men run a lower risk of developing prostate cancer.)
Ever-growing research strongly suggests that none of this is random or coincidental. Rather, it's clear that, from biology to risk factors to treatment options, cancer and diabetes are intimately related in many ways.
Cancer and diabetes are two sides of the same coin, asserted DebbieThurmond,Ph.D. , Chair of the Department of Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology at CityofHope'sDiabetes&MetabolismResearchInstitute . They are disruptions of the body's normal metabolism.
That may help explain why obesity is a major risk factor for both diseases. Excess fat may begin that disruption process, as well as inc Continue reading

World Diabetes Day 2017: Mindfulness Musings for Daily Practice

World Diabetes Day 2017: Mindfulness Musings for Daily Practice

This year’s theme for World Diabetes Day is Women and Diabetes, so I figured as one of the 11 million American women with diabetes , and a counselor who specializes in mindful approaches to living well with diabetes, I’d share a few concerns and ideas with the blogosphere, in hopes of touching a few of you with something of value….
Here’s the headline from the Non-Communicable Disease Alliance (NCDA), one of the organizations promoting awareness of our disease this year:
"Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women globally, causing 2.1 million deaths each year. As a result of socioeconomic conditions, girls and women with diabetes experience barriers in accessing cost-effective diabetes prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment and care, particularly in developing countries."
When I read statements like this, my mind and heart sink into sad thoughts and dejected emotions. “What can I do to help such an enormous problem?” Recent outpouring of tangible assistance for those in the wake of our many natural disasters this year, give hope – and they give us something to DO, like send extra supplies or money for the valuable humanitarian efforts to keep our fellow diabetes tribe members alive.
What about the feelings that still linger? Feelings and thoughts of fear (what if I’m affected by the next disaster? Am I adequately prepared?), guilt (why not me? Could I do more?), anger (at institutions, governments, global warming, people who drive Hummers, etc), despair and/or indignation (this problem is all just too big, too much; life is hard enough Continue reading

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