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Vitamin D And Diabetes

Vitamin D and Diabetes

Vitamin D and Diabetes

Renewed interest in vitamin D, the so-called “sunshine vitamin,” has occurred recently because it has been linked to everything from cancer and heart disease to diabetes.1 Research studies continue to pour into the literature stating that vitamin D is a superstar when it comes to health. However, most of the research is based on observational, epidemiological studies, which are important for generating hypotheses but do not prove causality.
A PubMed search in 2011 using the term “vitamin D” and selecting articles published in the past 2 years resulted in more than 2,864 hits. The following diseases and conditions have been researched to assess their relationship with vitamin D status: osteomalacia/osteoporosis,2–5 muscle function and falls,6–8 cancer,9–14 multiple sclerosis,15 hypertension,16 type 1 diabetes,17 rheumatoid arthritis,18 tuberculosis,19,20 mental health,21 cardiovascular events,22,23 infection,24,25 seasonal affective disorder,26 obesity,27 aging,28 and overall mortality.23
The challenge for health care providers and nutrition researchers is to determine whether vitamin D deficiency actually causes or increases the incidence of certain diseases or whether, instead, low levels of vitamin D are simply coincidental given that the majority of the general population, regardless of disease, is likely to have insufficient levels of vitamin D. In other words, do people who develop disease states just happen to be deficient in vitamin D, or do low levels of vitamin D cause the disease? Will supplementation with vitamin D prevent diseases, and can it be us Continue reading

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Broccoli Extract Shows Promise for Type 2 Diabetes

Broccoli Extract Shows Promise for Type 2 Diabetes

But supplement only seems to help a certain group of people with the disease
HealthDay Reporter
WEDNESDAY, June 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Your Mom may have been right about broccoli's goodness. A small study hints that a substance in the crunchy veggy may help some with diabetes get better control of their blood sugar.
Researchers found that a concentrated extract of the substance, called sulforaphane, helped obese type 2 diabetes patients rein in their stubbornly high blood sugar levels.
The caveat, however, is that the study was short-term and small -- involving 97 people with diabetes followed for 12 weeks. And the extract was taken in addition to the diabetes drug metformin, not instead of it.
Plus, the extract the researchers used was not like the sulforaphane supplements available at your local health food store.
"The way that you produce and process the extract is important to keep the sulforaphane intact," said senior researcher Dr. Anders Rosengren, of the University of Gothenburg, in Sweden.
He said his team used a highly concentrated supplement that was tested for purity and side effects.
"At this point," Rosengren said, "we cannot recommend that anyone take the currently available extracts on the market to treat type 2 diabetes."
Sulforaphane is a chemical found in cruciferous vegetables such as cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and broccoli. Broccoli sprouts are a particularly rich source.
Lab research has suggested that sulforaphane may help reduce inflammation in the body, and possibly fight cancer and fatty liver disease, according to Rosengren's team.
But it Continue reading

Top 5 benefits of cannabis for diabetes

Top 5 benefits of cannabis for diabetes

Diabetes is the term for a group of related metabolic disorders characterized by prolonged high blood glucose levels. Diabetes affects almost 400 million people worldwide, resulting in up to five million deaths per year--and its prevalence is rising. Substantial evidence indicates that cannabis may prevent and treat the disease.
Diabetes is the term for a group of related metabolic disorders characterized by prolonged high blood glucose levels. Diabetes affects almost 400 million people worldwide, resulting in up to five million deaths per year–and its prevalence is rising. Substantial evidence indicates that cannabis may prevent and treat the disease.
Preventative
Diabetes is associated with high levels of fasting insulin and insulin resistance, as well as low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). In 2013, the results of a five-year study into the effects of cannabis on fasting insulin and insulin resistance were published in the American Journal of Medicine. Of the 4,657 respondents, 2,554 had used cannabis in their lifetime (579 were current users and 1,975 were past users) and 2,103 had never used the drug.
The researchers found that current users of cannabis had 16% lower fasting insulin levels than respondents who had never used cannabis, as well as having 17% lower levels of insulin resistance and higher levels of HDL-C. Respondents who had used cannabis in their lifetime but were not current users showed similar but less pronounced associations, indicating that the protective effect of cannabis fades with time.
The researchers also ran analyses o Continue reading

There is a New A1C Test for Diabetic Pets

There is a New A1C Test for Diabetic Pets

Recently a new test for pet diabetes became available. It is the hemoglobin A1C for dogs and cats. I think there are definitely some situations where this test will be good for veterinary patients, but please don’t throw out your glucose meters just yet. A blood glucose curve is still my preferred test to evaluate glucose regulation in diabetic pets.
Doctors use the A1C test for humans as well. This test gives us a reflection over the recent past as to what the patient’s blood glucose has been. It is a longer “look” at past blood glucose than the fructosamine test that we veterinarians have had in our toolbox for years.
A blood glucose reading from a blood glucose meter tells us what the blood glucose is at a moment in time. A fructosamine test gives us an indication of what the blood glucose regulation has been over the previous few weeks. The new hemoglobin A1C test gives us an indication of the blood glucose over the last 110 days for dogs and over the last 70 days for cats.
What Might be a Good Time to Use a Fructosamine or A1C Test?
Fractious pets that won’t allow a blood glucose curve at home or even in the clinic would be reasonable patients to forego a curve and settle on one of these tests. If a pet would harm the owner (while attempting a blood glucose curve) or if the pet becomes so stressed at a vet clinic that a blood glucose curve is tarnished with stress hyperglycemia, an A1C test can be helpful. Given the average situation, a relaxed pet who will allow blood glucose checks by owners, is the better option as I’d still much rather evaluate a blood Continue reading

Diabetes, Cancer and the Drug that Fights them Both

Diabetes, Cancer and the Drug that Fights them Both

by Megan L Norris
figures by Bradley Wierbowski
The emerging link between cancer and diabetes
In the early 2000s, observations that diabetics are more likely to get cancer than non-diabetics began piling up. Was this because diabetes and cancer share general risk factors such as diet, aging and obesity? Or was there a direct link between them, with cancer benefiting from the sugar-rich and inflamed environment brought on by diabetes? Making bad news worse, it became apparent that cancer thrives in the presence of excess insulin, like that injected by many diabetics as therapy. Thus, one of the ways to treat diabetes could be making the cancer risk even worse.
Almost as soon as this dark cloud began to loom, rays of light broke through from an unexpected source. Research on a popular type II diabetes treatment called metformin revealed that metformin actually seemed to lower the risk for colorectal and other cancers in diabetics. Though it may seem paradoxical that metformin and insulin injections, two treatments for the same disease, could have such opposite effects on cancer, years of research in both the clinic and the laboratory has begun to pull back the curtain on this mystery. Broadly speaking, metformin makes the body more sensitive to the insulin it already is. For type II diabetics, not only does this increased insulin sensitivity treat diabetes, but it drains the fuel on which some cancers may thrive.
Diabetes is a pervasive disease
Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the US and is on the rise. More than 10% of Americans over 20 years old have diabetes, Continue reading

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