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Understanding The Honeymoon Phase In Type 1 Diabetes

Understanding the Honeymoon Phase in Type 1 Diabetes

Understanding the Honeymoon Phase in Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Forester McClatchey
A terrible illness struck me a few months after my diagnosis. The story is fairly complicated, but here are the essential elements: I participated in a Phase II Clinical Trial for a drug that was supposed to make diabetic life easier; the drug made me sick; a flurry of illnesses followed; I ended up with mono.
During those bed-ridden days, my fever climbed to 105 degrees Fahrenheit and my grip on reality became weak. I don’t think I actually hallucinated, but it makes a better story to say that I did. So, I hallucinated. The most interesting part of the experience, however, was the fact that my blood sugars stayed almost-perfect the whole time.
This fact contradicted the diabetic wisdom that states that sickness and fever will drive one’s blood sugars into the stratosphere. I never bolused for what little food I could manage, and still my levels hovered around 140. Hardly any insulin entered my body. Was I hallucinating? No: I was in the Honeymoon Phase.
The Honeymoon Phase, or “Honeymoon Period,” which can last for as long as a year, occurs when the body makes a partial recovery from its autoimmune attack. If you want to approach a thorough comprehension of T1D, or if you know anyone who was diagnosed recently, it’s important to understand what’s going on here.
But in order to understand the Honeymoon Phase, we must take a look at T1D’s pathogenesis, or, how the disease develops. Side note: I will give one whole dollar to anyone who can use “pathogenesis” in a Scrabble game.
As you probably know, Type I diabetes strikes whe Continue reading

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Type 2 diabetes becoming a childhood epidemic | Miami Herald

Type 2 diabetes becoming a childhood epidemic | Miami Herald

Before, the only people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes were older adults. However, times have changed. In the past 20 years, new cases of Type 2 diabetes in childhood have increased from less than 5 percent to more than 20 percent of all new diagnoses. What is causing this disturbing trend? What is Type 2 diabetes, and how can we protect our children from this disease?
Type 2 diabetes is the form of diabetes in which the body is resistant to the action of insulin. Insulin levels rise, and when the body can no longer make enough insulin, blood sugars rise. This is different from Type 1 diabetes, in which the body stops making insulin.
Although Type 1 diabetes is still more common among children, Type 2 diabetes — previously called adult onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes — is becoming more common among adolescents and even younger children. Type 2 diabetes occurs in children as young as 6, and is increasing at an alarming rate, primarily due to the epidemic of obesity in children and adolescents.
Type 2 diabetes is also more common among some ethnic groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans. Another risk factor is a family history of Type 2 diabetes or if diabetes occurred in the mother during pregnancy.
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There are a number signs parents should watch for if they suspect their child has diabetes, including:
▪ Frequent urination or new bed-wetting.
▪ Increased thirst and appetite.
▪ Decreased energy.
▪ Unexplained weigh Continue reading

Imbalance Of Gut Bacteria Linked To Elevated Risk For Diabetes

Imbalance Of Gut Bacteria Linked To Elevated Risk For Diabetes

New data from researchers at the University of Copenhagen provides stronger evidence linking certain bacteria that populate our intestinal tract with a higher risk for developing insulin resistance, ultimately a precursor to developing diabetes.
The research was published in the journal Nature late last week, suggesting that the gut microbiome might be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in this ravaging disease.
Insulin resistance is a condition whereby the body still produces insulin, but is not able to utilize it effectively. When someone develops insulin resistance, glucose accumulates in the bloodstream rather than being absorbed by the cells in the body, ultimately leading to prediabetes or to type 2 diabetes.
After extensively studying a population’s gut microbial composition to identify specific compounds (branched-chain amino acids, BCAA) that ultimately led to insulin resistance from the action of specific bacteria, the researchers then extracted the causative bacteria and fed them to mice who were devoid of any bacterial flora (sham mice) to prove that the action of the bacteria on the gut flora was truly the cause of insulin resistance.
" We show that specific imbalances in the gut microbiota are essential contributors to insulin resistance , a forerunner state of widespread disorders like type 2 diabetes, hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, which are in epidemic growth," said Professor Oluf Pedersen, Metabolism Center, University of Copenhagen, and senior lead author of the research.
The researchers from the University of Cop Continue reading

16 Of The Best Foods To Control Type 2 Diabetes

16 Of The Best Foods To Control Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition whereby the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells of the body are not responding properly to the insulin that is produced. Some people believe that once diagnosed, they will need to be medicated for a lifetime.
However, many people that are type 2 diabetic, with rigorous diet control, are able to stay away from medication. An intake of the correct micronutrients such as chromium, magnesium and zinc, along with a balanced intake of carbohydrates, fats and proteins can often provide enough support to regulate your blood sugar levels.
Here are 18 of the best foods to help support diabetes!
1. Nuts
High in both fats and protein, nuts are a great food to snack on and include in your breakfast, smoothies or salads.
2. Fish
Fish is rich in omega-3 fats, which are vital for reducing the inflammation that can come with diabetes. Fish is also a great source of lean protein.
3. Coconut Oil
Rich in medium-chain triglycerides, coconut oil may help to slow down the absorption of sugars in the blood and improve insulin sensitivity.
4. Algae
Algae is a superfood that supports diabetes by providing alkalization to the body tissue. Plus, it contains little to no carbohydrate so shouldn’t affect blood sugar levels!
5. Hemp seeds
Just 3 tablespoons of hemp seeds provide you with 10 grams of protein and around 3000mg of omega-3 fats. As protein supports blood sugar levels and omega-3 fats reduce inflammation, this is one food to include.
6. Avocados
Avocados are loaded with healthy fats and a little bit of protein, helping to regulate your Continue reading

A Quest: Insulin-Releasing Implant For Type-1 Diabetes

A Quest: Insulin-Releasing Implant For Type-1 Diabetes

Scientists in California think they may have found a way to transplant insulin-producing cells into diabetic patients who lack those cells — and protect the little insulin-producers from immune rejection. Their system, one of several promising approaches under development, hasn't yet been tested in people. But if it works, it could make living with diabetes much less of a burden.
For now, patients with Type-1 diabetes have to regularly test their blood sugar levels, and inject themselves with insulin when it's needed.
Some researchers are developing machines to automate that process.
But Crystal Nyitray, founder and CEO of the biotechnology startup Encellin, in San Francisco, didn't want to use a machine to treat diabetes. As a graduate student in bioengineering at the University of California, San Francisco a few years ago, Nyitray wanted to try something different: living cells.
"Cells are the ultimate smart machine," she says. Clinical trials that transplant insulin-making pancreatic cells into people with diabetes have been underway for several years, with some success. But the recipient's immune system is hard on these transplanted cells, and most patients still need insulin injections eventually.
Nyitray and colleagues designed a system that would encase live islet cells from the pancreas in a flexible membrane that could be implanted under the skin. Insulin and blood sugar could pass through the membrane, but cells from the recipient's immune system would be kept out, preventing immune rejection.
"I think of it like if you're sitting in a house and you have the win Continue reading

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