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Type 2 Diabetes: Why Sleep Quality Matters

Type 2 Diabetes: Why Sleep Quality Matters

Type 2 Diabetes: Why Sleep Quality Matters


Type 2 Diabetes: Why Sleep Quality Matters
A good nights sleep can help manage blood sugar, blood pressure, and insulin resistance. Heres how to get high-quality sleep.
Medically Reviewed by Rosalyn Carson-DeWitt, MD
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Most people with type 2 diabetes know that making certain daily lifestyle choices such as eating a healthy diet and getting regular exercise are essential to managing the condition. But what about getting good sleep?
Experts say that quality sleep is just as essential, and that poor sleep negatively affects many health issues related to type 2 diabetes , including blood sugar levels, according to a consensus statement issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and published in January 2017 in the journal Endocrine Practice .
Poor sleep is very common with type 2 diabetes, says Daniel Einhorn, MD , a clinical endocrinologist, medical director of the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute in San Diego, and past president of the AACE. This can have an adverse effect on all aspects of [the condition].
Both the quality and quantity of sleep matter when it comes to type 2 diabetes. According to multiple studies over the past two decades, poor sleep can disrupt a number of factors related to type 2 diabetes, including:
Sleep deprivation affects the bodys ability to use glucose efficiently, which can increase the risk for type 2 diabetes. And people with sleep problems difficulty falling or staying asleep, sleeping fewer than 5 to 6 h Continue reading

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Apple Stock Prediction: Gadgets For Diabetes Management Could Provide Apple A New Source Of Revenue

Apple Stock Prediction: Gadgets For Diabetes Management Could Provide Apple A New Source Of Revenue

The article was written by Motek Moyen Research Seeking Alpha’s #1 Writer on Long Ideas and #2 in Technology – Senior Analyst at I Know First.
AAPL Stock Prediction
Summary:
Apple is reportedly testing a smart band for blood glucose level monitoring. The said smart band will allegedly work as an add-on for the Apple Watch.
A smart band for diabetics to continuously monitor their blood sugar level offers plenty of economic potential for Apple.
There are more than 422 million people around the world that suffers from diabetes. That’s a huge market for wearable blood sugar tracker.
Selling diabetes-focus smart bands helps Apple lessen its dependency on iPhone sales.
AAPL has strong buy signals from the market trend algorithmic forecasts of I Know First.
Apple (AAPL) is set to make some money on its upcoming smart band for blood sugar level tracking. CNBC reported that Tim Cook himself is testing a non-invasive glucose monitoring device. I appreciate this latest foray for diabetes management. There’s more than 422 million people around the world that suffers from diabetes. Apple could sell a $99 or $149 non-invasive blood sugar level tracker and I expect it to easily sell 20 million units per year.
Look at the chart below that the World Health Organization (WHO) published last year. WHO emphasized that the population of diabetes-stricken people are on the rise too. The increasing sedentary lifestyle of people will continue to contribute to the diabetes epidemic.
Apple’s entry as a vendor that will help diabetes sufferers is therefore judicious. The future economic con Continue reading

World Diabetes Day: Celebs share realities of dealing with the chronic condition

World Diabetes Day: Celebs share realities of dealing with the chronic condition


World Diabetes Day: Celebs share realities of dealing with the chronic condition
These celebs who all suffer, or have suffered, from diabetes have spoken out about their condition in the hope to encourage others to take charge of their health. (Reuters images)
By Rachel McArthur Special to Al Arabiya English Tuesday, 14 November 2017
Today, November 14, is World Diabetes Day, a campaign led by the International Diabetes Federation to raise awareness and reflect the realities of dealing with a chronic condition.
This years theme focuses on Women in Diabetes to reflect the fact that every 1 in 10 women around the world is living with diabetes. Shockingly, it is still a leading cause of death amongst women.
There are two types of diabetes Type 1, which usually develops in childhood or adolescence, causes the immune system to mistakenly attack the beta cells of the pancreas, resulting in no, or very little, insulin being released into the body. Type 2, which often develops later on in adult life, occurs when the body cant properly use the insulin that is released. Either way, sugar builds up in the blood instead of being used as energy, which is dangerous.
Worryingly, 1 in 2 people currently living with diabetes remain undiagnosed. The earlier you screen the better.
These celebs who all suffer, or have suffered, from diabetes have spoken out about their condition in the hope to encourage others to take charge of their health.
A post shared by Halle Berry (@halleberry) on
With her enviable figure, its hard to believe that fitness enthusiast Halle Berry has Type 2 dia Continue reading

Diabetes management 3: the pathogenesis and management of diabetic foot ulcers

Diabetes management 3: the pathogenesis and management of diabetic foot ulcers


Diabetes management 3: the pathogenesis and management of diabetic foot ulcers
The final part in this three-part series on diabetes looks at causes, management and complications of diabetic foot ulcers.This article comes with a handout for a journal club discussion
Two frequent features of diabetes are peripheral vascular disease leadingto ischaemic lower limb extremities, and sensory neuropathy, which renders the patient prone to foot injury and vulnerable to the development of diabetic footulcers. This final article in our three-part series on diabetes describes the clinical features of the diabetic foot and discusses the importance of early assessment and effective management.
Citation:Nigam Y, Knight J (2017) Diabetes management 3: the pathogenesis and management of diabetic foot ulcers. Nursing Times [online]; 113: 5, 51-54.
Authors:Yamni Nigam is associate professor in biomedical science; John Knight is senior lecturer in biomedical science; both at the College of Human Health and Science, Swansea University.
This article has been double-blind peer reviewed
Scroll down to read the article or download a print-friendly PDF here
Download the Nursing Times Journal Club handout here to distribute with the article before your journal club meeting
In this series, read part 1 here and part 2 here
Diabetes is a costly disease that takes a heavy toll both on patients and families, as well as on healthcare resources. It is estimated to affect around 3.2million people in the UK and to take up a tenth of the NHS budget (Hex et al, 2012). Disease of the foot is one of th Continue reading

Understanding diabetes testing: Where are we, and where are we going?

Understanding diabetes testing: Where are we, and where are we going?

Diabetes is a prevalent and pressing health concern, affecting 29.1 million people in the United States alone—8.1 million of whom are as-of-yet undiagnosed.1 While people with diabetes make up more than nine percent of the entire U.S. population, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 86 million more people have some level of prediabetes,2 meaning they have blood glucose or hemoglobin A1c levels that are elevated but not to the point that they demonstate frank type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is an increased likelihood of developing diabetes.
Worldwide, in 2015, there were 415 million people with diabetes. That number is expected to jump to 642 million people by the year 2040. North America, the Caribbean, and Europe will experience incremental growth in diabetes cases during that time, but other regions of the world will see numbers of patients with diabetes more than double (Table 1). A total of $673 billion—12 percent of global health expenditure—is allocated to diabetes.3
Type 1 and type 2
Not everyone with prediabetes will develop diabetes; however, an estimated 15 to 30 percent will develop non-insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes within five years.4 Non-insulin-dependent diabetes was formulated as a category after the discovery, in 1959, that some people with diabetes still produce insulin.5 Insulin-dependent diabetes, originally called “juvenile” diabetes, is categorized as type 1 and manifests with symptoms that are sudden and dramatic.
This distinction between type 1 and type 2 should not be seen as minimizing the health risks assoc Continue reading

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