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Type 2 Diabetes - The Signs And Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes - The Signs and Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes - The Signs and Symptoms

There are 21 million people in the world who have been diagnosed with diabetes, but there are still around 8.1 million people who have the disease and don’t know about it (27.8% of people with diabetes are undiagnosed). Symptoms of this disease vary from person to person, but, like with most diseases, the earlier you catch it, the better off you will be.
Therefore, it is definitely worth getting to know, and keeping an eye out, for the symptoms of diabetes.
• You are above the age of 45
• You have already been diagnosed with pre-diabetes
• You are overweight or inactive
• You are African American, a native of Alaska, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, or Pacific Islander American, and are experiencing atypical symptoms.
Common Symptoms of Diabetes
If you’re experiencing any of the below, you should contact your doctor as soon as possible.
Excessive Urination (Polyuria)
Polyuria is an increase in the frequency of urination. When you have abnormally high levels of sugar in your blood, your kidneys draw in water from your tissues in order to dilute the sugar, so your body can expel it in the urine. The cells are also pumping water into the bloodstream to flush out the sugar, and the kidneys are not able to reabsorb this fluid during filtering, resulting in excessive urination.
To meet the clinical definition of polyuria, an adult’s urine output must be more than 2.5 liters per day (normal urine output is 1.5 liters).
As it’s near enough impossible for you to measure this yourself, if you notice that you’re visiting the bathroom more times than Continue reading

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Quality of Life in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review

Quality of Life in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review

Copyright © 2017 Daniela Marchetti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Background and Objective. Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) could significantly increase the likelihood of health problems concerning both potential risks for the mother, fetus, and child’s development and negative effects on maternal mental health above all in terms of a diminished Quality of Life (QoL). The current systematic review study is aimed at further contributing to an advancement of knowledge about the clinical link between GDM and QoL. Methods. According to PRISMA guidelines, PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Cochrane databases were searched for studies aimed at evaluating and/or improving levels of QoL in women diagnosed with GDM. Results. Fifteen research studies were identified and qualitatively analyzed by summarizing results according to the following two topics: GDM and QoL and interventions on QoL in patients with GDM. Studies showed that, in women with GDM, QoL is significantly worse in both the short term and long term. However, improvements on QoL can be achieved through different intervention programs by enhancing positive diabetes-related self-management behaviors. Conclusion. Future studies are strongly recommended to further examine the impact of integrative programs, including telemedicine and educational interventions, on QoL of GDM patients by promoting their illness accept Continue reading

#WorldDiabetesDay: 5 things to eat to reduce risk of type 2 diabetes

#WorldDiabetesDay: 5 things to eat to reduce risk of type 2 diabetes

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes.
Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk.
Diabetes Prevention Programs
Studies around the world, including Finland, China and the US have shown diabetes prevention programs prevent or delay progression to type 2 diabetes. When people eat more healthily, drop their body weight by 5-10% and walk for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, they lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by about 58% over two years.
We recently gave 101 men with pre-diabetes a self-directed diabetes prevention program over six months. We found they were able to reduce their portion size of potato and meat and improve their variety of health foods.
They were able to reduce the proportion of energy coming from junk food by 7.6% more than the group who didn’t change their diet and got a four-point increase in their scores from the Healthy Eating Quiz. These improved eating patterns were associated with an average weight loss of 5.5kg and better blood sugar regulation.
This is great news for the 318 million adults around the world, who have pre-diabetes.
The original diabetes prevention studies started in the 1980s. Back then the advice was to reduce your total kilojoule intake by eating less fat, especially from take-away, processed and fried foods and to eat more foods rich in carbohyd Continue reading

Drinking most days may protect against diabetes - new study

Drinking most days may protect against diabetes - new study

Drinking alcohol most days of the week significantly protects against developing diabetes, a new study suggests.
Data from more than 70,000 drinkers found that having a drink on three or four days per week was associated with a reduced risk of 27 per cent in men and 32 per cent in women, compared with abstaining.
Wine had the biggest effect, with scientists suggesting that its chemical compounds improve blood-sugar balance.
However, researchers have warned women to stay clear of gin and other spirits, which were associated with an increased of diabetes for women by 83 per cent.
Our findings suggest that alcohol drinking frequency is associated with the risk of diabetesProfessor Janne Tolstrup, University of Southern Denmark
Previous studies had already suggested that light to moderate alcohol consumption can cut the risk of diabetes, but the new research is the first to focus on drinking frequency.
Scientists studied data on 70,551 men and women taking part in a large Danish health survey who were quizzed about their drinking habits and monitored for five years.
The authors, led by Professor Janne Tolstrup from the University of Southern Denmark, who said: "Our findings suggest that alcohol drinking frequency is associated with the risk of diabetes and that consumption of alcohol over three to four weekdays is associated with the lowest risks of diabetes, even after taking average weekly alcohol consumption into account."
During the follow-up period, a total of 859 men and 887 women from the study group developed diabetes.
The investigation did not distinguish between the t Continue reading

Magnesium To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Magnesium To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Diet may play a major role in magnesium and its association to type 2 diabetes.
Nutrients and their effect on diabetes prevention have become a major topic of research in numerous studies. Magnesium is of significant interest because it has been recognized that almost half of the U.S. population has a magnesium deficiency. Low magnesium intake is also known to impair insulin function. Magnesium deficiency tends to be more distinct in individuals with prediabetes and diabetes. It has also been suggested that low magnesium intake results in an increased risk of prediabetes and diabetes development. Previous studies have shown that a higher magnesium intake does in fact result in decreased diabetes risk. However, few studies have analyzed how diet and carbohydrate quality affect this relation.
The following study analyzed data from three large cohorts conducted in the U.S called the Nurses’ Health Studies (NHS and NHS2) with a total of 160,647 participants and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) with a total of 42,096 participants. The study aimed to determine whether a higher magnesium intake results in type 2 diabetes risk reduction and how high glycemic index (GI) diets, those low in cereal fiber and high in carbohydrates, more specifically foods high in sugar and foods made with white flower, affect this association.
Participants in the three cohorts were followed for 28 years and evaluated for onset of type 2 diabetes. Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) completed at baseline and every 4 years were utilized to obtain specific details on dietary intake. FFQs Continue reading

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