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Type 2 Diabetes In Newly Diagnosed 'can Be Reversed'

Type 2 diabetes in newly diagnosed 'can be reversed'

Type 2 diabetes in newly diagnosed 'can be reversed'

An extreme eight-week diet of 600 calories a day can reverse Type 2 diabetes in people newly diagnosed with the disease, says a Diabetologia study.
Newcastle University researchers found the low-calorie diet reduced fat levels in the pancreas and liver, which helped insulin production return to normal.
Seven out of 11 people studied were free of diabetes three months later, say findings published in the journal.
More research is needed to see whether the reversal is permanent, say experts.
Type 2 diabetes affects 2.5m people in the UK. It develops when not enough insulin is produced in the body or the insulin that is made by the body doesn't work properly.
When this happens, glucose - a type of sugar - builds up in the blood instead of being broken down into energy or fuel which the body needs.
The 11 participants in the study were all diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes within the previous four years.
They cut their food intake drastically for two months, eating only liquid diet drinks and non-starchy vegetables.
Fat loss
After one week of the diet, researchers found that the pre-breakfast blood sugar levels of all participants had returned to normal.
MRI scans of their pancreases also revealed that the fat levels in the organ had decreased from around 8% - an elevated level - to a more normal 6%.
Three months after the end of the diet, when participants had returned to eating normally and received advice on healthy eating and portion size, most no longer suffered from the condition.
It offers great hope for many people with diabetes.Prof Keith Frayn, University of Oxford
Profe Continue reading

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Alert dog for diabetes senses blood sugar drop miles away, warns family

Alert dog for diabetes senses blood sugar drop miles away, warns family

(KUTV) Sadie, 4-years-old, has Type one diabetes and Down syndrome, which makes it difficult for her parents to keep her blood sugars stable.
That's until a special Labrador joined the family.
Sadie's Hero has quite the nose. He is a trained diabetic alert dog, so he can tell when her blood sugars are going too high or too low.
When her blood sugars start drop below 100, Hero will whine or nose or paw Sadie's parents in the left hand to let them know there's a problem. When her blood sugars get above 200, Hero lets her parents know using the same tricks, but this time in the right hand.
"I'll hold out my hands and say, what is it? and he'll paw for, paw my left hand for a low, and he'll nose my right hand for a high," explained Sadie's mom Michelle.
But back in December 2015, Hero truly lived up to his name.
Sadie was in her special needs class at Deerfield Elementary School in Cedar Hills while Hero was at home in Pleasant Grove -- more than five miles away.
That's when he started to act out, trying to warn Sadie's mom that the girl's blood sugar levels were dropping.
"He's normally a very quiet dog. Whining is not in his protocol. But he just started whining and he would not stop," Michelle said.
He was alerting to Michelle that Sadie's blood sugars were dropping -- but he was nowhere near Sadie.
Sadie's mom decided to contact the school just in case.
Kimberly Stoneman was teaching Sadie's class when she got the call.
"(Sadie's mom) called me and asked if I could check her numbers and they were fine," Ms.Stoneman explained. "I tested her and it was fine. Then within half Continue reading

Reversing Diabetes: Naturally Reverse Diabetes in 30 Days

Reversing Diabetes: Naturally Reverse Diabetes in 30 Days

According to the US Center for Disease Control (the US CDC), 25.8 million Americans are already struggling with reversing diabetes and nearly 80 million more are living in a pre-diabetic state.
Even more alarming — many of them not even being aware of the danger for how close they are to having to struggle with a lifetime of this dangerous and debilitating disease.
These numbers are absolutely staggering.
We are, after all, talking about nearly 25% of the entire US population living with a disease that can completely transform our lives in the blink of an eye.
Diabetes works to shut down critical systems throughout the body, and is not only deadly but can also require amputation long before it actually takes our lives.
In turn, forcing us to lead the kinds of lives that none of us had ever envisioned.
On top of that, the cost of treating diabetes is absolutely sky high.
In 2012 alone (the last time this research was conducted) more than $245 billion was spent annually on diabetes treatment.
$176 billion was spent in direct medical costs and another $69 billion was lost due to decreases in productivity. (mainly from individuals having to leave the workforce because of this condition)
According to the New York Times in a variety of other sources, one dollar out of every five dollars spent on healthcare costs in the United States is spent on diabetes.
Diabetes is also the seventh leading cause of death in the United States today.
One out of three Americans are going to be at risk of coming down with diabetes at some point in their lives.
This often results from poor lifestyl Continue reading

Can eating too much fruit trigger gestational diabetes?

Can eating too much fruit trigger gestational diabetes?

Women who eat large amounts of fruit during pregnancy may have a higher risk of gestational diabetes.
A new study found that women who ate lots of fruit during their second trimester were four times more likely to develop the disease.
The raised risk was particularly associated with fruits high on the glycaemic index.
However, those who ate more fruit also had a higher total intake of carbohydrates. This may be the real culprit (see our analysis below).
The study, published in Nature, aimed to investigate the association between fruit consumption during the second trimester and the occurrence of gestational diabetes. It tracked the diets of 772 women for more than a year.
Of the 772 participants, 169 were diagnosed with gestational diabetes during the study period.
An increased likelihood of gestational diabetes was particularly associated with consumption of tropical and citrus fruits, along with fruits high on the glycaemic index, which include bananas, pineapple, apricots, kiwis, watermelon, dates and raisins.
Gestational diabetes is a temporary condition during pregnancy but it raises the risk of type-2 diabetes in later life.
Instant analysis
This was a prospective cohort study evaluating the association of fruit consumption and the occurrence of gestational diabetes. This study design is insufficient on its own in establishing causality, but establishes correlation.
Gestational diabetes is diabetes diagnosed in pregnancy usually between 24 to 28 weeks of gestation, when insulin resistance is at its highest, which was not evident before pregnancy and doesn’t persist Continue reading

CUT your risk of diabetes

CUT your risk of diabetes

Diabetes is more common now than you probably realise. And it is neither just overweight people nor those who have a sweet tooth who are at risk.
This long-term medical condition can afflict anyone whose blood glucose levels remain higher than normal all the time. It happens when one’s pancreas does not produce enough insulin (a hormone that reduces the blood glucose levels), or when insulin does not work properly.
If you need a statistic compelling enough to make you sit up and pay more attention to the silent killer that is diabetes, one in nine Singaporeans has a lifetime risk of developing this disease, according to the National Health Survey in 2010. Of these, one in three diabetics was unaware of his condition.
The problem has continued to be so serious that Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong mentioned it in his National Day Rally speech.
Even more worrying is that the number of diabetics could rise to 670,000 by 2030, based on an estimate by the Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health.
Prevention is better than cure, though this is easier said than done, especially when early symptoms of diabetes can be easily missed.
But by taking charge of your health, you can make positive changes to improve your quality of life in the long run. Remember, every step counts.
Watch your diet
Start by keeping a closer watch on what you consume every day, without compromising on taste. Portion control is key, and you can follow the My Healthy Plate guide by the Health Promotion Board (HPB) to plan well-balanced meals.
Make sure that a quarter of your plate is filled with brown rice or who Continue reading

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