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Type 1 Diabetes Originates In The Gut But Probiotics Could Offer Cure

Type 1 Diabetes Originates in the Gut But Probiotics Could Offer Cure

Type 1 Diabetes Originates in the Gut But Probiotics Could Offer Cure

Two separat
e pieces of research have found that the development of type 1 diabetes is likely caused by the gut, and therefore, a type of probiotic could be the cure.
Scientists from several European and US institutions studied 33 Finnish infants over three years from birth who were genetically predisposed to type 1 diabetes.
Their study, entitled “The Dynamics of the Human Infant Gut Microbiome in Development and in Progression toward Type 1 Diabetes” is published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.
They discovered that four children in the group that developed type 1 diabetes had 25% less types of bacteria in their guts than other children.
The same four infants were also found to have more amounts of a specific bacteria that is known to trigger gut inflammation. This could be a prelude to type 1 diabetes as the bacteria causes the immune system to mistakenly attack and destroy beta cells in the pancreas that usually make insulin and monitor glucose levels.
“We know from previous human studies that changes in gut bacterial composition correlate with the early development of type 1 diabetes, and that the interactions between bacterial networks may be a contributing factor in why some people at risk for the disease develop type 1 diabetes and others don’t,” said Jessica Dunne, Director of Discovery Research at Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), a UK charity which funded the study.
“This is the first study to show how specific changes in the microbiome are affecting the progression to symptomatic T1D.”
By being able to understand how the community of Continue reading

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Can Diabetes Be Reversed? Study Claims Weight Loss And Cutting Calories Cure Condition, Even In Long-Term Patients

Can Diabetes Be Reversed? Study Claims Weight Loss And Cutting Calories Cure Condition, Even In Long-Term Patients

Roughly 330 million people around the world have Type 2 diabetes; the cure for it may be as simple as adhering to a strict diet. In 2011, a team of United Kingdom researchers from Newcastle University published a study that showed Type 2 diabetes could be reversed in overweight and obese patients who followed a very low-calorie diet over the course of eight weeks to stimulate fat removal from around the pancreas.
The team set out to replicate their findings on a larger scale to see if the weight loss successfully kept diabetes at bay over the long term, and published their findings in the journal Diabetes Care. They found that in Type 2 diabetes patients, restrictive diets weren’t just a quick fix. Once the weight came off and insulin production began to function normally, patients stayed diabetes-free and were allowed to resume normal, healthy diets.
"The study answered the question that people often ask me — if I lose the weight and keep the weight off, will I stay free of diabetes? Yes!” said the study’s lead author Roy Taylor, a metabolism and medicine professor at Newcastle University. "What we have shown is that it is possible to reverse your diabetes, even if you have had the condition for a long time, up to around 10 years.”
For the study, researchers followed 30 participants over the course of six months as they maintained a calorie-restrictive diet of 600 to 700 calories a day — a third of what they were normally eating each day. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the average adult should eat between 2,000 and 3,000 calories a day, depend Continue reading

Cure for type 1 diabetes a step closer

Cure for type 1 diabetes a step closer

Research into a possible cure for type 1 diabetes has taken an "important step forward," according to the latest research by scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University.
The study, which was published in journals Nature Medicine and Nature Biotechnology on Monday, builds on work by the Harvard Stem Cell Institute which last year discovered a way of creating beta cells (whose primary function is to store and release insulin) which could then be implanted in mice and, it is hoped in future, humans with diabetes.
Now, in the latest development, scientists and researchers at MIT and Harvard, in collaboration with other university experts, have developed an implantable device that could prevent those implanted insulin-producing cells from being attacked by the immune system for six months – effectively allowing the insulin-producing cells to do their job.
Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system kills off the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Daily injections of insulin are the primary treatment, but are only partially successful in regulating patients' metabolism.
If a device could be implanted into diabetics that could prevent those insulin-producing cells from being attacked, it could be a huge leap forward in terms of research. The results could have an impact on health provision around the world as diabetes ranks as one of the leading causes of death in America.
Type 1 diabetes differs from type 2 Continue reading

What is the future for diabetes treatment?

What is the future for diabetes treatment?

The future of treating Type 1 diabetes
There are few conditions that science has made such a fundamental impact on as Type 1 diabetes - the first use of insulin in the 1920s transformed it from a death sentence into something people can live with.
But even today, Type 1 diabetes typically involves a lifetime of daily injections and, on average, people with it die younger than the rest of the population. This is why we urgently need more research into the condition.
Diabetes: type 1 vs. type 2
In type 1 diabetes, the body is unable to produce any insulin
In type 2 diabetes, not enough insulin is produced or the insulin that is made by the body doesn't work properly
One of the most exciting areas of research is islet cell transplants. These involves taking the islet cells - the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin - from dead donors and putting them into people with Type 1 diabetes, whose own islet cells have stopped working.
Diabetes UK funded the UK's first 15 islet cell transplants. It is now available on the NHS and 34 people have benefited since 2005.
The treatment is very effective. However, there are still issues to solve. The transplanted cells only last for a few years; there is a very limited supply of cells; and it is difficult to stop the body rejecting them.
We are already funding research that will help to solve these issues. The results should make islet transplants more successful and available to more people in the next few years.
Artificial pancreas
We are also funding research into the artificial pancreas, a combination of electronic devices that work Continue reading

How I Lost 140 Pounds, Cured My Type 2 Diabetes, and Saved Thousands in Medications

How I Lost 140 Pounds, Cured My Type 2 Diabetes, and Saved Thousands in Medications

In 2010, my doctor suggested that I purchase a funeral plot, because I would most likely need one within five years unless I lost weight and got my chronic health conditions under control. I was 51 years old and taking well over $1,000 in medications per month. I had type 2 diabetes; my total cholesterol was 300; my blood pressure was 160/100; I was about 320 pounds at 5’10”, my waist was 52 inches, and my shirt size was 3XL. I was constantly exhausted and sleeping ten to twelve hours each night. It was becoming harder and harder to walk, and I couldn’t tie my shoes or walk up a few stairs without becoming out of breath. I was single but hadn’t been on a date in 15 years and stopped attempting to maintain friendships or even leave my home except when absolutely necessary.
I had been overweight for 30 years and was morbidly obese. I had tried most of the fad diets marketed for weight loss in this country, including Atkins, South Beach, Weight Watchers, Nutrisystem, and many more. I used my best efforts to follow each of those diets, and was usually able to lose some weight. But eventually I found all of them to be unsustainable, and when each failed I quickly regained the temporary weight loss, plus an extra ten pounds. And then I would resume eating packaged and processed foods that were delivered to my home or served to me through the window of my car.
My final straw came in August 2010, as I was returning home from a business trip. My flight was delayed when my airline ran out of seat belt extensions, and the regular seatbelt was too short for me to buckle. As my Continue reading

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