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Type 1 Diabetes: Living With The Misconceptions, Discrimination And Its Management

Type 1 diabetes: Living with the misconceptions, discrimination and its management

Type 1 diabetes: Living with the misconceptions, discrimination and its management


Type 1 diabetes: Living with the misconceptions, discrimination and its management
Living with Type 1 diabetes has many day-to-day challenges and over the years patients have faced confusion, misunderstanding and discrimination.
Not enough insulin and/or insulin resistance
Managed with exercise, diet and medication
This week is Diabetes Awareness Week and while it is becoming more recognised there are still many misconceptions.
There is often confusion between Type 1 and Type 2, which can be frustrating for everyone with diabetes.
In the past, discrimination has caused people with Type 1 diabetes to suffer major changes to their lives.
For Ros Cameron, 68, Type 1 diabetes almost ended her dream of becoming a teacher before it started.
She was diagnosed in January 1967 just after she had finished year 12 and had earned a scholarship to teacher's college.
But because of her diabetes she failed the mandatory medical test and was barred.
"I had to then rearrange my life," she said.
Her father lobbied the Victorian Education to end the discrimination.
"[He] thought, 'this is not right, it should be each person on their merits'," she said.
"Over a long period ... three years, the law was eventually changed that diabetics were admitted into government institutions according to their merits."
Two years later she was able to begin studies and eventually become a teacher.
"It was a very disappointing start to what I'd hoped would have been a long career in teaching," she said.
Diabetes management has changed since Ms Cameron was first diagnosed.
She had to learn ho Continue reading

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Peppercorns Benefits Including Preventing Cancer, Diabetes - Dr. Axe

Peppercorns Benefits Including Preventing Cancer, Diabetes - Dr. Axe


Current: Peppercorns: Can They Help Prevent Cancer and Diabetes?
Peppercorns: Can They Help Prevent Cancer and Diabetes?
Dr. Axe on Facebook104 Dr. Axe on Twitter30 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest174 Share on Email Print Article
Though salt is the most widely used spice, peppercorn is the most widely traded spice in the world. And while its knownas the king of spices, its actually a fruit. Yes, a fruit. From the Piperaceae family, the black pepper vineproducespeppercorns, which are the fruit of the pepper plant that have been dried for use.
There are three types of peppercorns: ( 1 )
Green peppercorns are the unripe version of the dried fruit.
White peppercorns are derived from nearly ripe peppercorn fruits with the skin removed.
Black peppercorns, which have been cooked and then dried, are the most common.
What makes peppercorns so popular? Well, certainly the spice pairs well with an array of food options, and it also exhibits an array of health benefits you may not have known about. For instance, did you know that peppercorns may benefit those with diabetes and even exhibits anticancer activity, much like black pepper essential oil ? Its true, but thats not all.
Turmeric has become very popular due to its amazing healing properties, but researchers indicate that its mosteffective if its combined with black pepper. Why? Because the piperine in black pepper helps the body absorb the amazing benefits of turmeric.
Recent studies share information regarding the positive effects of various spices, such as black pep Continue reading

Join the Fit with Diabetes Challenge

Join the Fit with Diabetes Challenge


Editors Note:Christel is a blogger, personal trainer, diabetes advocate, fitness bikini champion and fitness personality. She has been living with Type 1 diabetes since 1997.
Beyond Type 1 met up with Christel Oerum from Diabetes Strong for a chat about fitness and her next Fit With Diabetes Challenge which is kicking off on January 3.
Christel has Type 1, but she also has professional training experience that pertains to safely and effectively working out with Type 1 diabetes, no matter what your level of fitness is. Heres what she had to say about the program that canchange the way those with Type 1 think and feel about working out and the physical and mental health that can follow.
BT1: Why did you decide to do the Fit With Diabetes challenge?
CO: I created Diabetes Strong as a website dedicated to diabetes and fitness because I was missing a place online for guidance on how to safely and effectively exercise with diabetes.
Every week, I receive a lot of really good questions from my readers and the people I train about how to manage blood sugars when working out , what to eat for good nutrition and blood sugar control, as well as more emotional questions on how to get motivated or how to manage the fears of hypoglycemia .
In my Fit With Diabetes Challenges, I (and a team of diabetes experts) take people through all of the different aspects of exercising and eating healthily with diabetes in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step fashion and give them the tools they need to be successful.
BT1: What can people expect from the challenge?
CO:This challenge will focus on Continue reading

The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus


The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus
Westman et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2008
Dietary carbohydrate is the major determinant of postprandial glucose levels, and several clinical studies have shown that low-carbohydrate diets improve glycemic control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a diet lower in carbohydrate would lead to greater improvement in glycemic control over a 24-week period in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Eighty-four community volunteers with obesity and type 2 diabetes were randomized to either a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (<20 g of carbohydrate daily; LCKD) or a low-glycemic, reduced-calorie diet (500 kcal/day deficit from weight maintenance diet; LGID). Both groups received group meetings, nutritional supplementation, and an exercise recommendation. The main outcome was glycemic control, measured by hemoglobin A1c.
Forty-nine (58.3%) participants completed the study. Both interventions led to improvements in hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and weight loss. The LCKD group had greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c (-1.5% vs. -0.5%, p = 0.03), body weight (-11.1 kg vs. -6.9 kg, p = 0.008), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+5.6 mg/dL vs. 0 mg/dL, p < 0.001) compared to the LGID group. Diabetes medications were reduced or eliminated in 95.2% of LCKD vs. 62% of LGID participants (p < 0.01).
Dietary modification led to improvements in glycemic control and medication reduction/elimination in mo Continue reading

What to Know About Diabetes Prevention Programs

What to Know About Diabetes Prevention Programs


Thanks in part to the YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program, 41-year-old Erin Rothermel was able to lose 60 pounds and reduce his blood pressure, among other health improvements.
Eric Rothermel, now 41, has always been mindful of his health. A tobacco control professional at the YMCA in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, he knows the importance of following a healthy diet, exercising, and watching your weight. But when he turned 39, he realized that some of his habits, like his waning physical activity, were beginning to catch up with him: His weight had crept up, and he could feel his energy levels plummeting.
When I weighed 282 pounds, I could feel it by the end of the day, Rothermel says. I was dragging.
Based on his weight, Rothermels colleague, who also happened to be Rothermels lifestyle coach, Megan Maurer, gave him a diabetes risk assessment questionnaire. The questionnaire showed that because of risk factors like a family history of diabetes and his body mass index (BMI) Eric was at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. She suggested that he try the YMCAs Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) .
To be completely honest, I wasnt thrilled about it, Rothermel says of the yearlong program. I knew what to do, and I knew I could get this under control. However, I wasnt doing anything about it.
Despite his skepticism, Rothermel joined the program.
How Diabetes Prevention Programs May Help Change the Course of Your Health
While every DPP has its own distinct features, the overall aim of these programs is to help people with prediabetes avoid developing full-blown type 2 diabetes.
Th Continue reading

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