diabetestalk.net

Type 1 Diabetes Cured In Dogs

Type 1 Diabetes Cured in Dogs

Type 1 Diabetes Cured in Dogs

For people who have Type 1 diabetes, help may soon be on the way. A recent study has shown that with one course of gene therapy treatment, diabetes can be eliminated in dogs.
Type 1, or juvenile diabetes is an autoimmune disease, meaning that the body’s immune system attacks its own healthy cells. Insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed. Blood sugar needs to be checked several times a day, and insulin injections administered. There is no cure, only treatments. Until now.
Dogs do not develop the same kind of diabetes as humans, so researchers from Barcelona’s Universitat Autonoma induced Type 1 diabetes in beagles between six months and one year old. (Sad, but it was necessary for the sake of progress, and there is no indication the dogs suffered because of it.) They were then injected with viruses that carry genes for both insulin and glucokinase, an enzyme involved in glucose processing. Later it was confirmed that the genes had been integrated into the dogs’ DNA.
The genes allowed the dogs’ bodies to regulate their own blood sugar levels without human intervention. There were no episodes of hypoglycemia after strenuous exercise. Four years later, and the dogs still show no signs of diabetes.
As part of the control, dogs that were injected with only the genes for insulin OR the glucokinase continued to have symptoms, suggesting that the genes must work in concert to be effective.
There is still much research to be done, because as some critics point out, the study induced diabetes in the beagles by chemically destroying beta cells, and there may Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
How Much Protein Should a Person with Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should a Person with Diabetes Eat?

Protein is an essential macronutrient (that means it's a large nutrient; the other two macronutrients are fat and carbohydrate) that your body needs to build, repair, and maintain most of your body's tissues and organs. Proteins are also necessary for immune system function, and they help some additional physiological processes. Usually, people with diabetes don't need any more protein than people who don't have diabetes, and there are times when less protein is better.
Daily Protein Intake
As long as your kidneys are healthy, about 15 - 20 percent of your daily calories should come from protein, which is the same amount suggested for a regular balanced diet. About 45 to 50 percent of your caloric intake should come from carbohydrates, and the rest should come from fat.
A person who needs 2,000 calories per day needs about 75 to 100 grams protein per day. Foods that are high in protein include meat, fish, fish and seafood, chicken, eggs, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds.
For example:
One-half chicken breast has 29 grams protein
One cup black beans has 15 grams protein
An egg has 6 grams protein
One cup low-fat milk has 8 grams protein
A 3-ounce portion of steak has 26 grams protein
High Protein Diets and Diabetes
Switching to a high-protein diet may seem like it should make a difference in blood sugar regulation, but the protein probably doesn't help much at all, at least for the long term.
According to an evidence review done by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, increasing protein intake doesn't appear to have any appreciable impact on how your sugar is diges Continue reading

FDA approves first

FDA approves first "artificial pancreas" for type 1 diabetes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first automated insulin delivery system -- a so-called “artificial pancreas” -- for people with type 1 diabetes.
“This first-of-its-kind technology can provide people with type 1 diabetes greater freedom to live their lives without having to consistently and manually monitor baseline glucose levels and administer insulin,” Dr. Jeffrey Shuren, director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in an agency news release.
The device -- Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G -- is what’s known as a hybrid closed-loop system. That means it monitors blood sugar and then delivers necessary background (also known as basal) insulin doses. The device will also shut off when blood sugar levels drop too low.
However, this device isn’t yet a fully automated artificial pancreas​. People with type 1 diabetes will still need to figure out how many carbohydrates are in their food, and enter that information into the system, the agency noted.
Medtronic said the new device will be available by Spring 2017. The FDA approval is currently only for people aged 14 and older. The company is now conducting clinical trials with the device in younger patients.
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease caused by a mistaken attack on healthy insulin-producing cells in the body, destroying them. Insulin is a hormone necessary for ushering sugar into cells in the body and brain to provide fuel for the cells. People with type 1 must replace the insulin their bodies no longer produce, through multiple daily injections or Continue reading

Ten Foods That Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Help Prevent Diabetes

Ten Foods That Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Help Prevent Diabetes

Tweet
When it comes to protecting yourself against diabetes, heart disease, and metabolic syndrome, diet is one of the most effective tools available. By choosing foods that moderate blood sugar and improve insulin sensitivity, it’s possible to prevent disease and keep your body lean and healthy.
This article provides a list of ten foods that have been shown in studies to improve insulin health and balance blood sugar. Before we get to the list, it should be noted that strength training and an active lifestyle are essential for insulin health. One of the primary predictors of diabetes is lack of physical activity.
For best results, put just as much effort into being physically active as you do into optimizing your diet.
Blueberries are packed with bioactive antioxidants that improve insulin action, possibly by lowering markers of inflammation. A recent study found that obese, insulin resistant volunteers who consumed blueberry smoothies for 6 weeks significantly improved insulin sensitivity compared to a placebo group. Take note that the subjects removed other foods from their diet to offset the calories in the blueberry smoothie so as not to gain body fat over the course of the study.
Vinegar improves pancreatic function so that your body releases less insulin in response to the carbs your eat. This is useful because when you eat high-glycemic carbs, such as bread, cookies, or fruit juice, the pancreas tends to overestimate the amount of insulin needed, releasing too much, which is associated with inflammation and blood sugar imbalances.
Similar to blueberries, leafy gre Continue reading

Healing After Surgery: Concerns and Expectations for People with Diabetes

Healing After Surgery: Concerns and Expectations for People with Diabetes

For diabetics who eat well, exercise and have excellent blood sugar control, the incidence of post-surgery problems is not much higher than for non-diabetics.
The risk of slow wound-healing and post-surgical infection increases with years having diabetes, difficult to control or poorly controlled blood glucose, and the presence of diabetes complications such as neuropathy (nerve damage).
The possibility of slow wound-healing is owed to the effects of high glucose on blood vessels and nerves, and the risk of infection is greater when healing is slow.
Slow Healing, Sensitive Nerves and Infection
Post-surgical tissue repair requires our smallest blood vessels to carry nutrients and oxygen to organs and nerves. When these blood vessels are damaged by the effects of high blood sugar, the healing process is slowed, and our nerves get stressed.
If our nerves do not receive adequate oxygen they are forced to work harder, just as we breathe harder when the atmosphere is thin. The nerves become irritated which may cause prolonged or increased post-surgery discomfort. Constant irritation can damage the nerves.
When a surgical incision is slow to heal, bacteria have increased opportunity to enter and enjoy the nutrient rich sugar buffet inside our body. Severely damaged nerves may not register the pain and swelling caused by the bacterial invasion.
The potential for an infection increases if the incision is on an extremity such as a hand or foot, where blood vessel and nerve damage can be more severe.
Infection and High Blood Sugar
Once within our body, bacteria reproduce quickly and b Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

Related Articles