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Too Much Bad Food, Too Little Exercise Is Leading To Devastating Diabetes For Kids | Miami Herald

Too much bad food, too little exercise is leading to devastating diabetes for kids | Miami Herald

Too much bad food, too little exercise is leading to devastating diabetes for kids | Miami Herald

The term “adult-onset diabetes” is no longer relevant, as the numbers of kids and teens who are being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes continues to climb – at alarming rates.
Doctors attribute poor diets and lack of exercise on the sharp rise of Type 2 diabetes in youth in the U.S., especially among certain ethnic and racial groups.
“Unfortunately, this is all part of the obesity epidemic sweeping our country, which also affects younger kids,” says Dr. Pascual de Santis, an endocrinologist with Baptist Health Medical Group.
“This has to do with increased consumption of processed, and rich-in-calorie foods, as well as the significant decrease of physical activity in this population — less sports and more video games.”
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De Santis says genetics and diet are “the two hits” that often determine if someone is at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. “There are plenty of kids who are obese or overweight that do not develop diabetes,” he says. “This is true mostly in Caucasians. Most other ethnic groups are at higher risks of developing this disease.”
In South Florida, the disease is particularly prevalent within African-American and Hispanic communities.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), funded a decade-long study, which concluded in 2012, called SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth. It shows alarming figures in the rate of new diagnosed cases of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in adolescents.
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Mobile apps for diabetes patients need careful review

Mobile apps for diabetes patients need careful review

Reuters Health - Diabetes patients who use smartphone applications to manage their condition should know that not all apps are reliable, researchers say.
“We have more than 165,000 health and fitness apps in app stores right now and little control over what’s being published,” said study author Francois Modave of the University of Florida in Gainesville.
“App manufacturers want to produce good information, but there’s no oversight from any health organization or agency,” Modave told Reuters Health by phone.
Approximately 29 million Americans have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
Modave and colleagues used the Mobile App Rating Scale to analyze and rank the top free apps for diabetes management. They also looked at the number of diabetes-specific management tasks that the apps included, such as physical activity, nutrition, blood glucose testing, medication and insulin dosage, health feedback, and education.
In June 2016, the researchers identified 120 free patient apps for Android and Apple devices and evaluated 89 that were in English and didn’t require subscriptions. Overall, the apps scored high on aesthetics and engagement but poorly on information and quality. Only four of the 89 apps integrated the six diabetes management tasks, and fewer than half the apps integrated four tasks.
The top free apps, according to the researchers, were Tactio Health: My Connected Health Logbook for iOS devices and American Association of Diabetes Educators Diabetes Goal Tracker for Android devices. The Accu-Chek 360 Diabetes Continue reading

Tips for Dining Out with Diabetes

Tips for Dining Out with Diabetes

CONTRAVE® (naltrexone HCI/bupropion HCl) is a prescription weight-loss medicine that may help adults with obesity (BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2), or who are overweight (BMI greater than or equal to 27 kg/m2) with at least one weight-related medical condition, lose weight and keep the weight off. CONTRAVE should be used along with diet and exercise.
One of the ingredients in CONTRAVE, bupropion, may increase the risk of suicidal thinking in children, adolescents, and young adults. CONTRAVE patients should be monitored for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In patients taking bupropion for smoking cessation, serious neuropsychiatric adverse events have been reported. CONTRAVE is not approved for use in children under the age of 18.
Stop taking CONTRAVE and call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you: thoughts about suicide or dying; attempts to commit suicide; depression; anxiety; feeling agitated or restless; panic attacks; trouble sleeping (insomnia); irritability; aggression, anger, or violence; acting on dangerous impulses; an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania); other unusual changes in behavior or mood.
Do not take CONTRAVE if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure; have or have had seizures; use other medicines that contain bupropion such as WELLBUTRIN, APLENZIN or ZYBAN; have or have had an eating disorder; are dependent on opioid pain medicines or use medicines to help stop taking opioids such as methadone or buprenorphine, or are in opiate withdrawal; drink a Continue reading

Basmati Rice and Diabetes by Dr Sarah Schenker

Basmati Rice and Diabetes by Dr Sarah Schenker

Basmati rice, particularly wholegrain Basmati rice can and should be a regular addition to the diets of people who suffer from Type 2 diabetes. Basmati rice is a naturally low to medium energy food but as with all carbohydrate foods, it’s the portion size that is important: an average serving of boiled rice is 150-180g providing 207-248 calories; a small serving (100g) provides approximately 138 calories. By contrast a typical takeaway portion of fried rice is 300g providing 558 calories, so it’s important not to assume all rice types are the same.
Wholegrain Basmati rice has the lowest GI (glycaemic index) of all rice types, which means once digested it releases its energy slowly keeping blood sugar levels more stable, which is a crucial part of diabetes management. On the other hand, sticky and risotto type rices have much higher GIs, so less suitable in a diabetic diet. The varying GIs of rice depends on the type of carbohydrate present in the grains. Basmati rice has the greatest amount of a type known as amylose which does not gelatinize during cooking and results in fluffy, separate grains. Whereas grains with more amylopectin burst on cooking resulting in sticky rice that can be eaten with chopsticks. The more intact the structure of a grain of rice the lower the GI because once consumed the particle size maintains intact for longer, slowing the digestive process. The higher quality brands of rice like Tilda have the technology to reject broken grains from their products, further guaranteeing the low GI of the rice. Steaming rice helps to better maintain the stru Continue reading

UTHealth research: Misfolded form of pancreatic protein could induce type 2 diabetes symptoms

UTHealth research: Misfolded form of pancreatic protein could induce type 2 diabetes symptoms

HOUSTON – (Aug. 1, 2017) – The symptoms of type 2 diabetes can be induced by a misfolded form of a pancreatic protein and possibly be transmitted by a mechanism similar to prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow disease), according to researchers from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
The findings were reported today in a paper published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 29 million Americans suffer from type 2 diabetes, a condition in which the body is unable to regulate blood glucose levels using the hormone insulin. Although the disease has been linked to a variety of genetic and environmental risk factors, what causes type 2 diabetes is still not completely understood.
More than 90 percent of type 2 diabetes patients show abnormal protein deposits in their pancreatic islets that are aggregates of a misfolded form of a protein called islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). The precise role of these IAPP aggregates in type 2 diabetes is unclear, but they may damage and kill the pancreatic beta cells that secrete insulin in response to elevated blood glucose levels. In this respect, type 2 diabetes could be similar to other diseases caused by misfolded protein aggregates, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and prion disorders.
“Until now, this concept has not been considered,” said Claudio Soto, Ph.D., senior author, professor in the Department of Neurology and the directo Continue reading

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