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To Mark World Diabetes Day, Israeli Company Promotes Needle-Free Glucose Test

To Mark World Diabetes Day, Israeli Company Promotes Needle-Free Glucose Test

To Mark World Diabetes Day, Israeli Company Promotes Needle-Free Glucose Test

To mark World Diabetes Day, the Israeli medical company Cnoga Medical is promoting its new, pain-free way to monitor blood glucose levels with the aim of easing the significant discomfort of patients who suffer from diabetes and who must track their sugar levels using a finger-pricking glucose meter a number of times a day.
Cnoga Medical‘s non-invasive glucometer “uses a camera to provide optical diagnosis of blood glucose level by observing changing color shades of the user’s finger,” the company said in a statement, released ahead of World Diabetes Day marked annually on November 14 to honor Canadian Dr. Frederick Banting, the co-discoverer of insulin, who was born on November 14, 1891.
SEE ALSO: Betalin Aims To End Insulin Injections By Treating Type 1 Diabetes With Cell Transplants
Cnoga says the device, launched last year and already approved for use in a number of countries worldwide including Italy, Brazil and China, “offers accurate blood glucose results that are comparable to those of a fingerprick,” but without the needles.
“It learns to correlate the user’s optical skin-tone characteristics with camera readings,” after a short training period, after which it “operates quickly, accurately, making tracking and compliance easier patients living with diabetes.”
“An array of light-emitting-diodes (LED) shines light in wavelengths from visual to infrared through the fingertip. As the light waves pass through the fingertip, some of it is absorbed and the reflected light signal is changed. A camera sensor detects the changes in the light signal in Continue reading

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Could going low-carb help you fight off diabetes? The usual advice for Type 2 is to eat plenty. But now a number of patients and doctors are leading a growing rebellion

Could going low-carb help you fight off diabetes? The usual advice for Type 2 is to eat plenty. But now a number of patients and doctors are leading a growing rebellion

For more than 30 years, the official advice to people with diabetes has been to ensure starchy carbo-hydrates, such as pasta, rice and potatoes, feature heavily in every meal while fats should be kept to a minimum.
But is it right? Not according to the increasing number of patients and doctors leading a grassroots rebellion against the standard advice.
They argue for a low-carb approach, claiming it can be more effective for weight loss and blood sugar control.
‘The low-carb diet has several beneficial effects on type 2 diabetes,’ says Dr Clare Bailey, a GP in Buckinghamshire, and wife of TV doctor Michael Mosley.
‘If it were a drug, companies would be running large trials to get it licensed.’
She and others want a low-carb diet to be offered to patients as another option, rather than the ‘high carbs for all’ advice.
The low-carb approach is a variation on the low-carb, high-protein Atkins diet, which was popular in the Nineties. Overweight people who had type 2 diabetes found that as well as shedding pounds, it stopped big rises in their blood sugar.
Keeping blood sugar under control is vital as it helps reduce the risk of diabetes complications such as heart disease and damage to the blood vessels (which can lead to ulcers and even amputation).
Around 80 per cent of the £20 billion the NHS spends on diabetes care goes on treating complications, says Diabetes UK.
Low-carb fans claim this diet is better for people with type 2 diabetes because they can’t handle glucose effectively. Since all carbohydrates, from refined flour to wholegrains and fresh vegetables Continue reading

10 Best Supplements for Diabetes- (+ how to take fewer pills… and major lifestyle advice)

10 Best Supplements for Diabetes- (+ how to take fewer pills… and major lifestyle advice)

I am not a doctor. Please consult your practitioner before changing your supplement or healthcare regimen. I may receive a commission if you purchase through links in this post.
Most medical sites absolutely pooh-pooh natural supplements as a means of controlling or reversing type 2 diabetes. But medical peer reviewed studies say just the opposite: “Medical doctors are therefore encouraged to incorporate dietary supplements into the regimen employed for … diabetes management.” (source)
I won’t go into the corruption that drives the medical field, but it’s time medical doctors stop doubting the power of diet and supplements to help the body heal. Insulin dependence is not a given. While many with type 2 diabetes may choose to continue using insulin as well as making lifestyle and supplement amendments, insulin dependence is what most medical doctors are educated to recommend. They do not know safe alternatives and doubt that safe alternatives exist.
Multiple studies (here, here and here) have shown that a Paleo diet, rich in pasture-raised meats, vegetables, nuts and seeds, fruits and starchy roots like cassava and sweet potato, is an effective treatment for diabetes and other metabolic disorders.
What about type 1.5 diabetes, (which is late onset type 1 and autoimmune in nature); can it be helped with diet and lifestyle? The answer is Yes. Type 1 and 1.5 diabetes (also called LADA for “latent autoimmune diabetes in adults”) are autoimmune diseases. So diet and lifestyle absolutely can positively affect change and improvement. (source)
This article can not enco Continue reading

Type 2 diabetes is not for life

Type 2 diabetes is not for life

Almost half of the patients with Type 2 diabetes supported by their GPs on a weight loss programme were able to reverse their diabetes in a year, a study has found.
SEEBRI NEOHALER should not be initiated in patients with acutely deteriorating or potentially life-threatening episodes of COPD or used as rescue therapy for acute episodes of bronchospasm. Acute symptoms should be treated with an inhaled short-acting beta2-agonist.
As with other inhaled medicines, SEEBRI NEOHALER can produce paradoxical bronchospasm that may be life threatening. If paradoxical bronchospasm occurs following dosing with SEEBRI NEOHALER, it should be treated immediately with an inhaled, short-acting bronchodilator; SEEBRI NEOHALER should be discontinued immediately and alternative therapy instituted.
Immediate hypersensitivity reactions have been reported with SEEBRI NEOHALER. If signs occur, discontinue immediately and institute alternative therapy. SEEBRI NEOHALER should be used with caution in patients with severe hypersensitivity to milk proteins.
SEEBRI NEOHALER should be used with caution in patients with narrow-angle glaucoma and in patients with urinary retention. Prescribers and patients should be alert for signs and symptoms of acute narrow-angle glaucoma (e.g., eye pain or discomfort, blurred vision, visual halos or colored images in association with red eyes from conjunctival congestion and corneal edema) and of urinary retention (e.g., difficulty passing urine, painful urination), especially in patients with prostatic hyperplasia or bladder-neck obstruction. Patients should be instruc Continue reading

How I beat type 2 diabetes with a liquid diet

How I beat type 2 diabetes with a liquid diet

Nearly half of patients have reversed type 2 diabetes in a "watershed" trial funded by Diabetes UK.
The trial suggests it is possible to put the disease into remission using a low calorie diet-based programme delivered entirely in primary care.
People spent up to five months on a low-calorie diet of soups and shakes to trigger massive weight loss.
In 2011, at the age of 59, Isobel was told she had type 2 diabetes. She took part in the trial and told The World at One how it went. Continue reading

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