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Tips For Managing Congestive Heart Failure

Tips for Managing Congestive Heart Failure

Tips for Managing Congestive Heart Failure


Tips for Managing Congestive Heart Failure
Congestive heart failure, or CHF, is a condition in which the heart is unable to pump enough blood to meet the bodys needs. Sometimes called just heart failure, the term is a little misleading. Heart failure doesnt mean that the heart has failed or that it no longer works; rather, it means that the heart is struggling to pump enough blood throughout the body.
There are many causes of CHF, and these include:
Cardiomyopathy, or weakened heart muscle
Toxic amounts of certain drugs, such as alcohol and cocaine
High blood lipids (cholesterol and triglycerides)
While maybe not a direct cause, certain lifestyle factors can contribute to or worsen CHF, such as being overweight or obese, smoking, drinking excessive amounts of alcohol, a high sodium intake, and lack of physical activity.
You may be surprised to learn that having diabetes puts you at risk for CHF. Heart failure is one of the most common complications of diabetes, and while many factors play a role, the two main culprits are hyperglycemia (high blood sugars) and insulin resistance (strongly linked with Type 2 diabetes ). Data from the well-known Framingham Heart Study showed that the frequency of heart failure is twice as high in men with diabetes and five times as high in women with diabetes compared to a control population.
How do you know if you have CHF? Symptoms that may indicate congestive heart failure are:
Swelling in your ankles, feet, or legs (called edema)
Sudden weight gain (due to fluid retention)
Of course, these symptoms can be due to other med Continue reading

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Diet study: American Diabetes Association vs. Low Carb Ketogenic

Diet study: American Diabetes Association vs. Low Carb Ketogenic


A randomized pilot trial of a moderate carbohydrate diet compared to a very low carbohydrate diet in overweight or obese individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus or prediabetes (Saslow et al., 2014)
Disclaimer: this study was not ground-breaking; it was confirmation of a phenomenon that is starting to become well-known, and soon to be the status quo. That is, advising an obese diabetic patient to reduce their carb intake consistently produces better results than advising them to follow a low fat, calorie restricted diet.
: 45-50% carbs; 45 grams per meal + three 15 gram snacks = 165 grams per day; low fat, calorie restricted (500 Calorie deficit). Otherwise known as a low fat diet (LFD).
In their words: Active Comparator: American Diabetes Association Diet. Participants in the American Diabetes Association (ADA) diet group will receive standard ADA advice. The diet includes high-fiber foods (such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes), low-fat dairy products, fresh fish, and foods low in saturated fat.
: Ketogenic; <50 grams of carb per day, no calorie restriction, just a goal of blood ketones 0.5 3 mM.
In their words: Experimental: Low Carbohydrate Diet. Participants will be instructed to follow a low carbohydrate diet: carbohydrate intake 10-50 grams a day not including fiber. Foods permitted include: meats, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, cream, some nuts and seeds, green leafy vegetables, and most other non-starchy vegetables. Because most individuals self-limit caloric intake, no calorie restriction will be recommended.
Both groups were advised to mai Continue reading

Using Aromatherapy to Relieve Diabetes Symptoms

Using Aromatherapy to Relieve Diabetes Symptoms

For those living with diabetes, aromatherapy or the use of essential oils can directly improve quality of life and help relieve their symptoms. Aromatherapy has often been relegated to the same category of medicine as crystal healing and reiki massage. “New Age” stores with chime music playing and incense burning in all four corners always seem to feature a display of essential oils by the cash register. However even though some vendors may make claims of essential oils that they can’t follow through on, medical research has proven that some oils can have genuine therapeutic value, both in terms of relieving stress and lowering blood pressure through aromatherapy, and also via physical means such as wound care and improving circulation.
What is Aromatherapy?
Aromatherapy is the use of essential oils to effect changes in your body, whether physical or emotional. An essential oil is basically a plant extract. The volatile compounds of various herbs, roots, and other plant material are extracted via pressing, heat processing, and other methods, and then mixed with what is called a carrier oil, a neutral oil such as jojoba oil, to allow it to be used in a targeted way. There are hundreds of plant species which have been recognized in various cultures and time periods to be helpful with any number of ailments.
The use of, and various methods of extraction for, essential oils is thought to originate with Ibn al-Baitar, a Muslim physician and chemist who lived in Spain in the late 12th and early 13th century.
The term aromatherapy was coined by a French perfumer in 1937. Ren Continue reading

Lack of Sleep May Raise Child's Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Study

Lack of Sleep May Raise Child's Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Study


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Lack of Sleep May Raise Child's Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Study
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TUESDAY, Aug. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children who get too little sleep may be more likely to have risk factors for type 2 diabetes , new research suggests.
The study of more than 4,500 British kids found a link between kids' sleep habits and certain diabetes "risk markers." Children who slept fewer hours each night tended to be a bit heavier and to show more insulin resistance .
Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. When the body starts to become resistant to insulin, that can be a precursor to type 2 diabetes .
So, the findings raise the possibility that childhood sleep habits could affect the odds of diabetes -- or other health conditions -- later in life, said researcher Christopher Owen.
"We believe that these small differences [in diabetes risk markers] early in life could plausibly persist," said Owen, a professor of epidemiology at St. George's, University of London.
Past studies, he noted, have found that diabetes risk can "track" from early life to adulthood.
However, the new findings do not prove that a lack of sleep causes kids' diabetes risk to rise, said Dr. Nicole Glaser.
Glaser, a pediatrician and professor at the University of California, Davis, cowrote an editorial published online with the study in the Aug. 15 issue of Pediatrics.
In it, she points out that there could be other explanations for the link between Continue reading

Study Ties Inflammation, Gut Bacteria to Type 1 Diabetes

Study Ties Inflammation, Gut Bacteria to Type 1 Diabetes


THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with type 1 diabetes show changes in their digestive system that aren't seen in people who don't have the autoimmune disease, a new Italian study finds.
Those changes include different gut bacteria and inflammation in the small intestine. The differences may play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes, the researchers said.
"For years, we have looked for the cause of type 1 diabetes in the pancreas. Perhaps, we looked in the wrong place and there is the possibility that the intestines play a key role in the development of the disease," said study senior author Dr. Piemonti Lorenzo. He is deputy director of the San Raffaele Diabetes Research Institute in Milan.
However, Lorenzo said it isn't possible to "draw definitive conclusions" about whether these intestinal changes can cause the autoimmune attack that leads to type 1 diabetes.
In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells in the body. Specifically, the disease causes the destruction of insulin-producing islet cells. That leaves the body unable to produce enough insulin, a hormone necessary for cells to use the sugars from foods as fuel.
Out of every 1,000 adult Americans, between one and five have type 1 diabetes, according to the Endocrine Society.
The new study included 54 people who had endoscopies and biopsies of the first part of the small intestine. In an endoscopy, a long, flexible tube with a camera is threaded down the throat -- while a person is sedated -- so a doctor can see the digestive tract. The same tube can Continue reading

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