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Tiny Sensor Placed Under The Skin To Replace Finger Prick Tests For Diabetes: Smartphone App Will Alert Patients If Their Blood Sugar Level Drops Or Is Too High

Tiny sensor placed under the skin to replace finger prick tests for diabetes: Smartphone app will alert patients if their blood sugar level drops or is too high

Tiny sensor placed under the skin to replace finger prick tests for diabetes: Smartphone app will alert patients if their blood sugar level drops or is too high

A sensor in the arm may help thousands with diabetes avoid having frequent finger prick tests.
The device, called Eversense, is slightly larger than a pill and is implanted under the skin in a five-minute procedure.
It then continuously monitors blood sugar levels from the fluid that bathes cells just below the skin and transmits the data to a smartphone.
If blood sugar levels drop too low or are too high, the patient receives an alert on their phone, so they can take insulin to reduce the levels or eat something sugary to increase them.
The device also has a vibration alert in case the phone is off or there is no signal.
It stops patients needing regular finger prick tests, which can be painful. It has been approved in Europe, but is not yet available in the UK, though it is being considered by the NHS.
A study presented recently at the Diabetes Technology Meeting in Maryland, U.S., showed it was accurate and effective when tested on 90 adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes for 90 days.
If this type of monitoring was used more widely, it could help to reduce hospital admissions and diabetic complications, according to the charity Diabetes UK.
It is particularly useful for patients with type 1 diabetes —where the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells in the pancreas, which then cannot produce insulin. It affects 400,000 Britons — about 10 per cent of all adults with diabetes.
Patients with this type of diabetes currently monitor blood sugar levels by taking between four and ten finger-prick tests a day, which helps them work out how much insulin they need.
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Bitter Melon for Diabetes: It Helps Beat Blood Sugar, A1c, Cholesterol & Weight!

Bitter Melon for Diabetes: It Helps Beat Blood Sugar, A1c, Cholesterol & Weight!

Although bitter melon may be new to you, it's been used as a diabetes treatment for high glucose levels for centuries in places like India, China, parts of Africa and South America.
Bitter melon is part of the cucurbitaceae family, a vine that bears a variety of different shaped fruits that are commonly used in cooking stirs fries and soups, and as an herbal tea. The young leaves can also be eaten fresh as greens.
JUMP TO: What is bitter melon | How does bitter melon work | Bitter melon for blood sugar & A1c | Bitter melon for insulin resistance | Bitter melon for cardiovascular disease | Bitter melon for weight | Benefits & conclusion
DISCLAIMER
Please note that this information is not an endorsement for bitter melon. We are simply sharing the research surrounding it. You should always discuss supplementation with your doctor.
What is bitter melon?
Bitter melon is a plant native to the tropical regions of Asia, South America, and the Caribbean. It also goes by several other names like “bitter squash,” “bitter gourd,” or “bitter apple,” as well as its scientific name, “momordica charantia.”
Judging by its many descriptive labels, you can probably guess how it tastes… bitter!
Still, while it may be one of the more sour fruits out there, you'll soon discover that its health benefits are pretty darn sweet.
How does bitter melon work?
Armed with 32 active phytochemicals, bitter melon is a disease-fighting machine. It has many anti-viral, anti-bacterial and hypoglycemic properties. But the main selling point of bitter melon is its ability to improve chronic met Continue reading

Major Study Confirms Racial Disparities Related to Key Diabetes Indicator, Hemoglobin A1c

Major Study Confirms Racial Disparities Related to Key Diabetes Indicator, Hemoglobin A1c

Major Study Confirms Racial Disparities Related to Key Diabetes Indicator, Hemoglobin A1c
Standard Test for Determining Blood Sugar Control in People with Diabetes Is Not Always an Accurate Measure of Blood Sugar Control and Interpretation Differs Based on Race.
Boston, MA – June 14, 2017 – T1D Exchange, an organization that is accelerating novel treatments and improving care, today published an important research study that confirms disparities between blacks and whites in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, the standard measure used to assess blood sugar control in people with diabetes. Racial differences in HbA1c levels have been consistently reported in adults and children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) or type 2 diabetes, with non-Hispanic blacks having higher A1c levels than non-Hispanic whites. T1D Exchange researchers sought to understand whether this difference is due to worse glycemic control in blacks or the consequence of racial differences in the glycation of hemoglobin.
This study builds upon previous T1D Exchange research that identified racial disparities in glucose control, with blacks having higher HbA1c levels than whites in both children and adults. In the scientific community, differing theories have been proposed regarding these disparities; that higher HbA1c levels in blacks represents worse glycemic control; and that higher HbA1c levels could be due to race-based genetic differences in the glycation of hemoglobin at the same glucose levels. If the latter were true, it would mean that HbA1c on average is overestimating the mean glucose concentration in bla Continue reading

Diabetes linked to memory decline in older adults

Diabetes linked to memory decline in older adults

Older adults with poorly controlled diabetes may struggle with what's known as episodic memory, the ability to recall specific events experienced recently or long ago, a study suggests.
Researchers examined results from a series of four memory tests done from 2006 to 2012 for 950 older adults with diabetes and 3,469 elderly people without the disease.
The participants who had diabetes and elevated blood sugar performed worse on the first round of memory tests at the start of the study and also experienced a bigger decline in memory function by the end of the study.
"We believe that the combination of diabetes and high blood sugar increases the chances of a number of health problems," said lead study author Colleen Pappas, an Aging researcher at the University of South Florida in Tampa.
"Our study brings attention to the possibility that worsening memory may be one of them," Pappas added by email.
While the study doesn't explore why this might happen, it's possible that elevated blood sugar damages brain cells that transmit messages in the hippocampus, a part of the brain involved in memory, Pappas said.
At the start of the study, when participants were about 73 years old on average, they all got blood tests that measure average blood sugar levels. This so-called hemoglobin A1c test measures the percentage of hemoglobin - the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen - that is coated with sugar, with readings of 6.5 percent or above signaling diabetes.
The people without diabetes had average A1c levels of 5.6, considered a normal or healthy range. But the diabetics had Continue reading

Highs & Lows: Reevaluating Hypoglycemia in Elderly Diabetes Patients

Highs & Lows: Reevaluating Hypoglycemia in Elderly Diabetes Patients

Hypoglycemia, a misunderstood diabetes complication, not only confounds the public and patients, but many healthcare providers as well. Elderly diabetes patients with hypoglycemia are especially vulnerable to this dilemma.
Mary M. Julius, RDN, CDE, clinical coordinator of Diabetes Self Management Education and Support and a research dietician and nutritionist at the Department of Veteran’s Affairs in Cleveland, Ohio, treats an 86-year-old man who has had type 1 diabetes for 50 years. His wife passed away last August. “He said to me, ‘Mary, for the past 55 years, all I’ve had to do is sit down and breakfast would be there,’” Julius says. “’I’d sit down and lunch was there. All I had to do was eat.’ He is going to bed hungry because this is a new skill for him.”
Julius’s patient is one of many in the very complex realm of hypoglycemia, and the fact that he’s in the vulnerable population of elderly people with diabetes, it only compounds the complexities. According to Julius, missing a meal is the number one cause of hypoglycemia, and elderly patients are at a higher risk of missing a meal than the general population. These patients are already frail at baseline, and older people tend not to eat as much anyway, whether they’re just not hungry or they suffer from food insecurity, but more on that later.
Hypoglycemia remains a complication of diabetes that’s not entirely understood. There still seems to be a lack of awareness among the healthcare community and the public, even among people with diabetes. For instance, hypoglycemia just isn’t as ap Continue reading

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