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This Turmeric-Lentil Soup Will Protect You From Type 2 Diabetes, Dementia And Cancer

This Turmeric-Lentil Soup Will Protect You From Type 2 Diabetes, Dementia and Cancer

This Turmeric-Lentil Soup Will Protect You From Type 2 Diabetes, Dementia and Cancer

Soup is one of the best ways to get a variety of nutrients while staying properly hydrated. Whether it’s finding comfort in a large bowl in the winter or cozying up with it on a rainy day, soup is an all-season food.
Plus, there are plenty of flavors, textures, and ingredients you can play around with to always keep it interesting. Finding a lentil soup recipe that is both nutritious and delicious can be a challenge, so just scroll below to find the perfect recipe!
Why You Should Drink Soup
Soup combines plenty of anti-inflammatory foods and spices to cure the cold and flu or even improve allergies and asthma. These foods also improve a number of other diseases caused by inflammation, such as depression, fatigue, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, psoriasis, obesity, Alzheimer’s, cancer, and more.
Inflammation is part of your body’s natural healing process. However, when it gets out of control, your body begins to attack itself. Chronic inflammation, of course, is triggered and worsened by stress, lack of sleep, and poor diet.
Chronic inflammation is often accompanied by (1):
Fever
Chills
Fatigue/loss of energy
Headaches
Loss of appetite
Muscle stiffness
Joint pain
Joint stiffness
The healing lentil soup recipe below is just one great way to fight off inflammation, stay hydrated, and fight off just about any disease.
Related: 9 Key Lifestyle Changes for Preventing Alzheimer’s and Dementia
Turmeric Coconut Lentil Soup Recipe
It might seem counter-intuitive to put apples in soup, but they provide a slightly sour and sweet touch to this lentil soup recipe. Make it as a Continue reading

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The Diabetes Drug Metformin Linked to Vitamin B12 Deficiency

The Diabetes Drug Metformin Linked to Vitamin B12 Deficiency

You may not be thinking about the importance of vitamin B12 simply because you concentrate more on other vitamins or you can’t think about it. This is because a lack of this vitamin can affect your ability to think clearly about many things.
Your body does not produce this water-soluble vitamin, so you have to provide the recommended dose with supplements. Along with other B vitamins, vitamin B12 helps the body convert carbs into glucose and produce energy.
Vitamin B12 promotes the production of RNA and DNA as well as works with folate to produce S-adenosyl methionine and red blood cells.
As we have mentioned, Vitamin B12 plays a crucial role in the central nervous system since it conducts the nerve impulses as well as it produces myelin sheath which protects the nerves.
However, a lack of this vitamin can be difficult to detect. Unfortunately, it can cause different health conditions including nerve damage. You should be careful in case you take metformin, a diabetes drug since it can cause vitamin B12 deficiency.
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Metformin and Vitamin B12 Deficiency
The effects of metformin on vitamin B12 were analyzed by the researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in NY. They have used the data from the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study and the Diabetes Prevention Program.
Also, there were included data from people taking a placebo and metformin twice a day. After 5 and 13 years, their levels of Vitamin B12 were once again measured.
This analysis showed Continue reading

Eating Clean with Diabetes: An Overview and a Guide

Eating Clean with Diabetes: An Overview and a Guide

Following a diabetes-friendly eating regimen can take many different forms: The Mediterranean diet, the DASH diet and the Atkins plan are all recommended for helping to control blood sugar and support metabolic health.
Eating clean with diabetes simply means paying attention to the quantity and quality of your macronutrient intake (protein, fat, carbohydrates) and also choosing foods that support balanced blood sugar levels for optimal energy, safety and health.
Food Groups
Understanding how to eat from the main food groups will help you better manage your diabetes:
Grains
Grains are rich in carbohydrates and should be eaten minimally if you're diabetic. Some grains are more carb-heavy than others, so steer clear of "white" foods and opt for whole-grain versions of bread, pasta or rice.
Fruits and Vegetables
Many fruits are high in sugar, which does not make them ideal for diabetes. However, fruits like blueberries, strawberries and raspberries are naturally lower in sugar and can be eaten in moderation.
Clean eating also means paying attention to your vegetable consumption: aim to eat mostly leafy green vegetables like kale, romaine, arugula or chard. Root vegetables like carrots or potatoes have more carbohydrates and should therefore be eaten less frequently or paired with protein to reduce blood sugar spikes.
Ideally, opt for fresh and organic vegetables, as canned varieties can include added salt, sugar, or carbohydrates.
Proteins
Lean proteins from organic sources are the best bet for diabetes and overall health.
Eggs and nuts are also good protein options, but diabet Continue reading

Immune Cell Discovery Could Offer Hope for Type 1 Diabetes

Immune Cell Discovery Could Offer Hope for Type 1 Diabetes

Recent findings from the University of Manchester suggest certain molecules could help cure the inflammatory response associated with type 1 diabetes.
T cells, which are crucial for fighting off infection and protecting the body from foreign invaders, attack the body's own tissues when there is an autoimmune disease present. Regulatory T cells help to stop this process, and researchers have identified new molecules that allow regulatory T cells to function more effectively.
"This knowledge is vitally important when trying to make regulatory T cells for therapy," said Dr. Mark Travis, from the Manchester Collaborative Centre for Inflammation Research. "By knowing the importance of this pathway, we can now work to improve the suppressive nature of regulatory T cells to make them more effective as treatments for disease."
Research may lead to improved treatment options
According to Dr. Travis, regulatory T cells are currently being used in clinical trials to understand further how these critical cells might improve type 1 diabetes therapy. By multiplying the amount of regulatory T cells in the body, the disease-inhibiting response can be boosted.
Dr. John Worthington, co-author of the study, said that understanding how regulatory T cells operate can lead to a potential cure for a variety of inflammatory conditions.
"We're hopeful this research will have a real impact on treatment therapies that use regulatory T cells, either by boosting their function by targeting this pathway or by cherry picking the very best regulatory cells to prevent autoimmunity," Worthington said.
The s Continue reading

Reading Nutrition Labels: What's Important if You Have Diabetes

Reading Nutrition Labels: What's Important if You Have Diabetes

Navigating nutrition labels can seem tricky if you have special dietary needs, but knowing the basics can help you quickly identify foods that are either diabetic- or not-so-diabetic-friendly.
Keep in mind that everyone has different nutritional needs, so it's a good idea talk with your doctor, dietitian or nutritionist about the following categories to make sure you know what to look for.
Carbohydrates
Carbohydrates are king when it comes to diabetes, and it's important to understand the power they have to affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates will always be listed on standard nutrition labels, oftentimes with the categories "Total Carbohydrates" and "Net Carbohydrates." Total carbohydrates refers to the total amount of carbohydrates in the food before fiber is subtracted from the nutritional equation – which then gives you net carbohydrates. The latter category is generally the one you want to be concerned with, as well as what source the carbohydrates are coming from (refined sugar, vegetables, dairy, etc.).
Fiber
The fiber content of a food can affect the total carbohydrate count as mentioned before. Foods higher in fiber will lower the net carbohydrate count and can also slow the rate of carbohydrate absorption. Fiber also helps to keep your blood sugar stable, so high-fiber foods are generally a great choice for diabetics. Current guidelines recommend about 25-38 grams of fiber per day, but you may be able to tolerate more.
Protein
Protein is essential for managing diabetes for several different reasons: It helps to increase satiety, keeping you full and less likel Continue reading

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