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This Protein Could Be Spreading Type 2 Diabetes Like Mad Cow Disease

This Protein Could Be Spreading Type 2 Diabetes Like Mad Cow Disease

This Protein Could Be Spreading Type 2 Diabetes Like Mad Cow Disease

A type of misbehaving protein might be behind some cases of type 2 diabetes, indicating the condition could potentially be contracted through blood transfusions and organ transplants, or passed to children before birth.
While a lot more research needs to be done to determine if the risks to the general public are in any way significant, the find has established a new area of study in how the disease develops and spreads inside individuals.
Led by researchers from the University of Texas, the study used mice to test whether clumps of a misfolded protein called amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) taken from a pancreas can spread and produce diabetes-like symptoms when transferred between individuals.
Unlike its sister disease type 1 diabetes, type 2 – or diabetes mellitus – is a condition that forms over time, reducing a person's ability to produce or respond to insulin.
The disease is far more common that type 1, affecting just under half a billion people worldwide, but its exact causes are still vague. Researchers have identified genetic and environmental factors, but there is still a lot to learn about how many people develop the condition.
Toxic clumps of misfolded proteins similar to those in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease have previously been associated with type 2 diabetes. But finding a link isn't the same thing as identifying a cause, so researchers have now taken a closer look at the amyloid proteins in the pancreas to trace their pathology.
Proteins such as IAPP can twist into forms that are more likely to clump as a result of mutations, which has al Continue reading

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Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Is hunger a sign of diabetes?
If you don’t have diabetes, could hunger be one of the signs of diabetes?
Is being hungry all of the time (polyphagia) a sign that you should go get checked for diabetes? After all, polyphagia is one of the “3 Poly’s,” is part of a triad of symptoms indicating diabetes. In addition to polyphagia, or increased hunger, the symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia are also signs of diabetes.
Susan’s story
Susan was constantly hunger. She never seemed to feel satisfied as she snacked off and on all day long from increasing hunger pangs. Susan’s hunger had gotten progressively worse over the past year.
She noticed that she had been going to the bathroom more frequently, and wasn’t sure if she might be getting a urinary tract infection. Oddly enough, she hadn’t gained any weight. She had even lost a few pounds. She visited her primary care provider, and relayed her symptoms to the nurse.
The doctor recommended that Susan be checked for several different conditions, but the one that stuck out in Susan’s mind was diabetes. She had an aunt with diabetes. She remembered how sick she got, and how she’d spend her days in the dialysis unit. Susan didn’t want diabetes, at least the kind that she knew about from her aunt.
When Susan contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she was concerned that she did indeed have diabetes. She was waiting for her test results, but she was eager to find out if hunger was a sure sign that she has diabetes?
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We decided to look into it for Susan. Let’s see what we found.
Polyphag Continue reading

The Professor’s Guide to Type 1 Diabetes

The Professor’s Guide to Type 1 Diabetes

For students –
It’s that exciting time of the year – back to school! Whether you’re heading into college as a freshman, or returning for another year at your university, you are heading into a time where you need to be independent and assertive about your health. Unlike elementary and secondary schools, colleges have no responsibility to identify disabilities. Therefore, it is the student’s job to let his or her school know about a Type 1 diabetes diagnosis in order to find out what accommodations are available. This is your choice in the end though. (Read about one US student’s opinion on applying for disability.)
Whether or not you apply for disability, you should let your professors know about your Type 1 and what to expect through the year. Here are some essential tips to get your professors up to speed on Type 1 diabetes.
Professor’s Guide to Type 1 Diabetes –
What is Type 1 diabetes?
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s own immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in their pancreas. People with Type 1 are insulin-dependent for life, and must manually give themselves insulin through multiple daily injections or an insulin pump. They must carefully balance insulin, food, exercise and other factors in order to prevent or minimize serious short and long-term complications due to out-of-range blood sugar levels.
If you have not heard much about Type 1, here are some other fast facts –
T1D is not caused by a lack of exercise or eating too much sugar
T1D is not contagious
There is no cure for T1D at the present mo Continue reading

Binge Eating Disorders

Binge Eating Disorders

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Binge eating is recognised as an eating disorder in which people feel compelled to overeat and feel powerless to be able to control their eating pattern.
Binge eating may result from psychological reasons but can also result from rises and falls in blood glucose levels from eating food with high carbohydrate content.
What counts as binge eating?
If you eat large amounts of food in a short period of time without feeling you are able to control your eating, this is a sign of binge eating.
Compulsive eating such as constantly needing to snack on high calorie foods between meal times is also a sign of binge eating.
What can cause binge eating to take place?
There are a number of psychological reasons which can trigger binge eating. The NHS state that around 50% of people that binge eat have had depression at some point in their life.
Negative feelings including being stressed, anxious, sad, helpless, guilty or bored can cause people to eat as a conscious or unconscious way of momentarily blocking out the negative emotion. In some cases people may eat to amplify the negative feelings.
Binge eating may also occur in people trying to lose weight through methods such as greatly restricted calorie content or missing meals, which can lead to intense hunger and feeling a need to binge eat.
It is common for binge eating to lead to other negative feelings such as guilt, regret or further loss of control shortly after eating which can trigger a vicious circle of continued binge eating.
How can hunger follow after recently eating?
It is not unusual to experience hunger soon after ea Continue reading

Weight loss with insulin resistance: Diet tips and strategies

Weight loss with insulin resistance: Diet tips and strategies

According to the World Health Organization, the prevalence of diabetes has risen significantly over the last 30-plus years.
In 1980, just 4.7 percent of the world's population had diabetes, but by 2014 this figure had soared to 8.5 percent.
This means approximately 422 million people were living with diabetes in 2014. These astounding statistics do not take into account the additional number of people with prediabetes or insulin resistance.
In this article, we take a look at what insulin resistance is and what its relationship with body weight is. How might being overweight lead to insulin resistance and what can be done to lose weight?
What is insulin resistance?
Insulin resistance leads to a condition known as prediabetes, which means that a person's blood sugar level is high, but not high enough to qualify as diabetes.
Having insulin resistance is a warning that, without intervention and effective lifestyle changes, someone with prediabetes may go on to develop type 2 diabetes.
Sugar (glucose) is the body's main source of food energy. People obtain it from the food they eat. After food is broken down in the body, the sugar enters the bloodstream.
In order to use it as energy, the body's cells need to "pick up" the sugar. Insulin, which is a hormone produced by the pancreas, helps this happen by moving the sugar out of the blood and enables it to enter the body's cells.
Insulin maintains blood sugar levels, ensuring they are not too high or too low. However, when blood sugar levels are persistently high, the body's cells stop responding to insulin as effectively. This is Continue reading

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