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This Gourd Kills Cancer Cells, Reverses Diabetes, STOPS Gout, And Cures Asthma!

This Gourd Kills Cancer Cells, Reverses Diabetes, STOPS Gout, And Cures Asthma!

This Gourd Kills Cancer Cells, Reverses Diabetes, STOPS Gout, And Cures Asthma!

The bitter gourd (also known as bitter melon) looks like a cucumber but with ugly gourd-like bumps all over it. As the name implies, this vegetable is a melon that is bitter.
There are two varieties of this vegetable: One grows to about 20 cm long, is oblong and pale green in color. The other is the smaller variety, less than 10 cm long, oval and has a darker green color.
Both varieties have seeds that are white when unripe and turn red when they are ripe. The vegetable-fruit turn reddish-orange when ripe and becomes even more bitter.
Bitter gourd thrives in hot and humid climates, so are commonly found in Asian countries and South America.
Unfamiliar with the bitter, Westerners can find bitter melon difficult to consume. But if you can handle the bitterness, you will be able to enjoy the health benefits of the bitter gourd. Try it, at least for all its healthful virtues!
Nutritional Benefits of Bitter Gourd
Bitter gourds are very low in calories but dense with precious nutrients. It is an excellent source of vitamins B1, B2, and B3, C, magnesium, folate, zinc, phosphorus, manganese, and has high dietary fiber. It is rich in iron, contains twice the beta-carotene of broccoli, twice the calcium of spinach, and twice the potassium of a banana.
Bitter melon contains a unique phyto-constituent that has been confirmed to have a hypoglycemic effect called charantin. There is also another insulin-like compound known as polypeptide P which have been suggested as insulin replacement in some diabetic patients.
Health Benefits of Bitter Gourd
There are few other fruit or vegetables th Continue reading

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Twitter-derived neighborhood characteristics associated with obesity and diabetes

Twitter-derived neighborhood characteristics associated with obesity and diabetes


Twitter-derived neighborhood characteristics associated with obesity and diabetes
1 Kimberly D. Brunisholz ,2 Weijun Yu ,3 Matt McCullough ,4 Heidi A. Hanson ,5,8 Michelle L. Litchman ,6 Feifei Li ,7 Yuan Wan ,8 James A. VanDerslice ,9 Ming Wen ,10 and Ken R. Smith 11
1Department of Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Maryland, College Park, School of Public Health, College Park, USA
5Department of Surgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT USA
8Utah Population Database, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA
9Division of Public Health, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA
11Department of Family and Consumer Studies and Population Science & Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA
1Department of Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Maryland, College Park, School of Public Health, College Park, USA
2Institute for Healthcare Delivery Research, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, USA
3Department of Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation, College of Health, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA
4Department of Geography, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA
5Department of Surgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT USA
6College of Nursing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA
7School of Computing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA
8Utah Population Database, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, USA
9Division of Public Health, Department of Family and Preventive Med Continue reading

Diabetes Health Type 1: What is your gut telling you?

Diabetes Health Type 1: What is your gut telling you?


Diabetes Health Type 1: What is your gut telling you?
Figuring out whats going on when you have stomach discomfort or digestive issues can be difficult for anyone, but this is especially true for people with diabetes. Diabetes can affect every system in your body, including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.
This shouldnt be surprising when you consider that moving food from the mouth to the stomach and then through nearly 30 feet of plumbing in the intestines is a complex maneuver involving countless nerves that control the speed and efficiency of all the built-in switches and trap doors along the way. Much as malfunctioning nerves can cause foot problems in peripheral neuropathy, diabetes can disrupt the nerves governing the digestive process. Recognizing the problem and seeking treatment as soon as possible can make a difference in controlling symptoms and helping to prevent long-term damage.
Here are some problems in both the upper and lower portions of the GI tract to watch out for:
Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD): Chronic heartburn that isnt easily explained by late night spicy foods may mean that something else is going on. GERD is a condition in which stomach acids regularly overflow into the esophagus, irritating the lining of the tube that links your mouth to your stomach. Over time, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as asthma, dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), scar-tissue buildup that can cause narrowing of the esophagus and even esophageal cancer. In milder cases, antacids such as Tums or Rolaids may do the trick. Histamine-block Continue reading

Sickle Cell Trait in Blacks Can Skew Diabetes Test Results

Sickle Cell Trait in Blacks Can Skew Diabetes Test Results


TUESDAY, Feb. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A blood test commonly used to diagnose and treat diabetes may be less accurate in black people who have the sickle cell anemia trait, a new study says.
The test is called hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C). An A1C reading of 5.7 or more indicates prediabetes or diabetes; below 5.7 is normal, says the American Diabetes Association.
But, the current study found that for blacks with a trait for sickle cell anemia, the A1C test may come back lower than it should. This discrepancy could lead to delays in diagnosis and treatment of diabetes, and it might also affect the management of known diabetes.
When the researchers compared the results of A1C tests to other measures that check blood sugar levels, they showed that when A1C readings were expected to be 6 percent, they only registered 5.7 percent for blacks with sickle cell trait.
"We want to make clinicians aware that things like race and hemoglobin traits can have an effect on A1C. If the A1C numbers don't jibe with blood glucose monitor numbers, this could potentially be a part of that," said Tamara Darsow.
Darsow, who wasn't involved in the study, is senior vice president of research and community programs with the American Diabetes Association.
The test measures the percentage of red blood cells that have become "glycated" over a two- to three-month period. Glycated essentially means the red blood cells have sugar attached to them. That can happen when blood sugar levels are too high (hyperglycemia).
Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder that affects the hemoglobin in red blood Continue reading

Amylin for Diabetes Management

Amylin for Diabetes Management


By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE Leave a Comment
We know that the beta cells, in the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas produce, store, and secrete insulin. In addition to insulin, these multi-tasking super cells in our body also manage to produce two other peptide hormones called amylin and C-peptide. In Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, the busy beta cells are deficient or absent.
Amylin is not insulin. It is another peptide hormone produced by the beta cells in the pancreas. It acts as a gate keeper. It keeps sugar from entering the blood stream by halting glucagon secretion. It also slows gastric emptying, and curbs appetite.
Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here.
While most people with diabetes may know about the beta cells, and their role in producing insulin, they may not be aware of insulins BFF, amylin. Amylin works alongside insulin to bring down blood sugars, curb appetite, and stop glucagon. Glucagon is basically more sugar that the liver releases.
When you have Type 1 Diabetes, your beta cells have all been attacked by your immune system, and you dont make any amylin. You can benefit from injections of synthetic amylin. When you have Type 2 Diabetes, you may also benefit from synthetic amylin, since your body has a deficiency of amylin.
What is the role, or purpose of amylin in your body?
The purpose of amylin in blood sugar regulation is to preve Continue reading

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