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Theresa May Reveals All About Living With Diabetes – But Vows Not To Let It Hold Her Back As Prime Minister

Theresa May reveals all about living with diabetes – but vows not to let it hold her back as Prime Minister

Theresa May reveals all about living with diabetes – but vows not to let it hold her back as Prime Minister

THERESA MAY has opened up about living with diabetes - but vowed not to let it hold her back in life.
The Prime Minister revealed yesterday she has to inject herself with insulin up to five times a day.
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PA:Press Association
She told ITV's Robert Peston during a Facebook live interview that fellow sufferers should not allow the illness to hold them back.
Following her diagnosis in 2012, the PM's type one diabetes means she has to keep a constant track of the glucose levels in her blood.
She was asked about her own experience by a fellow diabetic yesterday.
PA:Press Association
PA:Press Association
Mrs May said: "I am a type one diabetic. That means when I eat, I have to inject insulin, which I do.
"I will be injecting myself four or five times a day... You just get into a routine.
"You depend on that insulin and you just build that routine into your daily life. The crucial thing to me is being a diabetic doesn't stop you from doing anything."
But the interview was hijacked by a question from Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.
He posted on Facebook to ask why the PM is refusing to take part on a TV debate with him.
The first seven-way leaders debate - which is due to take place on Thursday - will feature senior spokespeople from the main political parties.
Mr Petson read out: "Hello Theresa May, as Prime Minister you've served your elite friends by giving them tax cuts when wages have stagnated, house-building is at its lowest since the 1920s, there are 20,000 fewer police on our streets since 2010 and the NHS is in crisis.
"Do you not think the British people deserve Continue reading

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JDRF, the type 1 diabetes charity

JDRF, the type 1 diabetes charity

Our research
One day, we will create a world without type 1 diabetes. Until that day, your support is vital for our world-class research, improving treatments until we find the cure
We fund research that will cure, treat and prevent type 1 diabetes and its complications.
We focus on investing in research that will transform the lives of people with type 1 diabetes – improving treatments today until we find the cure.
This mission cannot be carried out in isolation, so we work with partner organisations to make sure we can change life with type 1 diabetes for the better as quickly as possible. But our most important partner is you – whether you help to fund the research, join a clinical trial or campaign for access to the new treatments that research delivers you are a vital member of our team.
Search or browse through summaries of JDRF-funded research projects from around the world here.
Find out more
Discover how we're working to cure, treat and prevent type 1 diabetes Continue reading

Dealing With Diabetes and Depression

Dealing With Diabetes and Depression

Autumn is here, and shorter, cooler days are just around the corner. Everyone is back to work or school and the hectic pace is back in full swing. It’s normal to feel a little down or sad, knowing that summer is behind you. But if you’ve been feeling this way for a while and you can’t seem to shake it off (as Taylor Swift likes to sing), maybe something a little deeper and more serious is going on.
The link between diabetes and depression
According to research, people who have diabetes are about two to three times more likely to have depression than people without diabetes. While depression can affect people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, those with Type 2 are more likely to develop it. Of course, having diabetes doesn’t mean you’re headed for depression, but the likelihood is higher.
Interestingly, not only does having diabetes increase the risk of depression, but being depressed increases the risk of diabetes. In a 10-year study, women who took antidepressants were 25% more likely to develop diabetes than women who were not depressed. Also, women who took insulin were 53% more likely develop depression.
What accounts for this connection? It’s possible that changes in the brain can raise the risk of depression. Blocked blood vessels or nerve damage from having diabetes may alter brain chemistry, thus raising the risk of depression. Other factors can help explain the link:
• Dealing with a chronic condition day in and day out can cause a great deal of stress and anxiety.
• Unmanaged blood sugars (meaning, a lot of highs and lows) can be challenging and can Continue reading

GESTATIONAL DIABETES: MUST-KNOW FACTS

GESTATIONAL DIABETES: MUST-KNOW FACTS

Gestational diabetes affects one in 10 pregnancies and increases the risk of complication. Here’s what parents need to know to have a healthy pregnancy.
Pregnancy is filled with milestones – feeling the first kicks, picking a baby name, preparing baby’s nursery. But preparing for your glucose challenge test may raise some questions.
Learn what a gestational diabetes diagnosis could really mean, how to reduce your overall risk and, most importantly, how to keep both you and your baby happy and healthy through it all.
What is gestational diabetes, really?
Traditional diabetes is a condition that develops when the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin, a hormone that helps deliver glucose (aka sugar) from your bloodstream and into your cells and organs for energy.
"Unlike Type 1 and 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes is caused in part by physiological changes that occur during pregnancy and affects one in 10 pregnant women," explains Christina Sherry, PhD, RD, a nutrition scientist with Abbott. "During pregnancy, pregnancy hormones can reduce or block the effectiveness of mom’s own insulin," she says. Coupled with other risk factors – everything from being overweight, having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or having a family history of Type 2 diabetes – this insulin resistance can progress to the point of gestational diabetes.
"Gestational diabetes can pose some health risks for mom and baby, including the risk of a high birth weight, jaundice, breathing problems for baby and increased chances of high blood pressure and preeclampsia for mom (a potentially Continue reading

How to Combat Heart Disease and Diabetes? Go Keto, says New Study

How to Combat Heart Disease and Diabetes? Go Keto, says New Study

A new study[1] indicates that when it comes to weight loss and regulating metabolic syndrome diseases like diabetes, a keto diet without exercise is more beneficial than the standard American diet (i.e., “standard American eating habits”) — with or without exercise.
Keto diet sans exercise outperforms standard American diet with exercise
The study included 30 adults previously diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a group of risk factors (like high blood pressure, high blood sugar, unhealthy cholesterol levels, and abdominal fat) that put you at risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. Researchers put the adults in one of three groups: a sustained ketogenic diet with no exercise, a standard American diet (SAD) with no exercise, or a SAD with 3-5 days of exercise per week at 30 minutes a pop. Over 10 weeks, the results revealed significant changes for the keto group — particularly, as related to weight, body fat percentage, body mass index, HgA1c (a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months) and ketones. In fact, all of these variables for the keto group out-performed the other two groups. The verdict is in – a keto diet without exercise is more potent than the standard American diet with exercise when it comes to weight loss and curbing diseases.
Ketosis helps you lose weight
Ketosis occurs when your body switches to burning fat instead of sugar or carbs for energy. That’s why the keto diet is low in carbs, moderate in protein, and high in fat. (Read more about the keto diet here.) For someone who can stand to s Continue reading

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