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The Treatment That Reversed Type 2 Diabetes

The treatment that reversed type 2 diabetes

The treatment that reversed type 2 diabetes


Easy Health Options Home Health Conditions Diabetes The treatment that reversed type 2 diabetes
The treatment that reversed type 2 diabetes
For the millions of patients who continue to go to their doctor for routine type 2 diabetes medications and care, this information is an eye opener
A new study published in the Lancet reveals that 86 percent of patients were able to completely eliminate all medications and remain diabetes-free just by doing one thing
In mainstream medicine, the entire focus of type 2 diabetes is disease management through medication.
Yes, there is sometimes mention of healthy diet and exercise, but thats about it it seldom goes much further than a brief discussion.
There are no education courses, coaching, or even detailed instructions provided for weight loss in the doctor office. The focus is clearly on which medication to take, how much to take and when.
That all needs to change because the study in the Lancet reveals that, most diabetics, technically, can reverse diabetes without medications.
In fact, in this study, the diabetic patients who took standard diabetes prescription medications fared worse (as far as diabetes control and quality of life) compared to those who safely got off their medications because they lost weight.
Ill share some interesting points regarding this study in a moment But first, have you ever heard of Gabriel Cousens, M.D.? If not, please watch this 5 minute YouTube documentary Simply Raw: Reversing Diabetes in 30 Days Trailer. He proves that diabetes can effectively be reversed in just 30 days by adhering to Continue reading

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Lack of sleep nearly triples risk of gestational diabetes | Daily Mail Online

Lack of sleep nearly triples risk of gestational diabetes | Daily Mail Online


Family of five from Oregon killed after their car plunges off a cliff along Pacific Coast Highway
Pregnant women who got less than 6.25 hours of sleep were 70 percent more likely to develop gestational diabetes than others, a new study shows
The pregnancy-related form of diabetes usually subsides after the mother delivers, but puts her at about seven times greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life
Gestational diabetes also increases the odds that the baby will be larger than average, which can complicate delivery
It is also a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and obesity later in the baby's life
Pregnant women who got less than 6.25 hours of sleep each night were 70 percent more likely to develop gestational diabetes than others, according to a new meta-analysis of two sets of studies.
Thepregnancy-related form of diabetes is marked by elevated blood sugar levels.
It can lead to higher birth weights and can put both mother and baby at higher risk to develop type 2 diabetes and obesity later in life.
The University of Illinois at Chicago study adds to a body of research linking insufficient sleep - which is more common among women, than men, and especially common in pregnant women - to other complications like postpartum depression .
Pregnant women may need slightly more sleep than the seven hours recommended for adults. A new study links not getting enough sleep to an increased chance of gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes is common among pregnant women, but rarely comes with any symptoms besides high blood sugar, only detectable with a blood Continue reading

Cell-Centered: Scientists Embrace Cell-Replacement Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes

Cell-Centered: Scientists Embrace Cell-Replacement Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes


Cell-Centered: Scientists Embrace Cell-Replacement Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes
A century ago, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence. Now, its a daily struggle. When blood sugar soars, diabetics risk damage to their eyes, kidneys, and nerves. And when blood sugar dips too low, vital organs like the heart and brain shut down, leading to lightheadedness or even coma.
Normally, the pancreas regulates blood sugar. A special population of cells, known as beta cells, make insulin, which helps the body soak up excess blood sugar after a meal. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system kills these cells. To compensate, patients inject themselves with insulin and check their blood sugar levels before and after meals.
Its a stressful task, though recent advances have helped. The major insulin makers including Sanofi, Novo Nordisk, and Eli Lilly offer slow- and fast-acting insulins to help patients control their blood sugar throughout the day. And in 2016, the FDA approved the first artificial pancreas, a device that combines a blood sugar monitor and an insulin pump to automatically give patients the dose of insulin that they need.
These treatments aim to make up for the loss of beta cells. But a group of scientists has another solution: put the beta cells back in. The idea may sound too simple to be true, but its already yielded promising results and could free type 1 diabetics from having to inject insulin.
What we would like to put back into diabetic patients is not just the hormone insulin, we would love to put back the beta cells, said Matthias Hebrok, Ph.D., director of the Continue reading

Holiday Eating for Diabetes: Tips, Management, and Food

Holiday Eating for Diabetes: Tips, Management, and Food


Got diabetes? Well, holiday eating can still befun
Christmas, Hannukah, New Year bring on the festivities! Its the season of celebrationand for most people, its also the season of food: Home-baked goods, work lunches, family dinners, cocktail parties theyre all a huge part of the holidays. But enjoying all the festive eats and treats is a different story when you have diabetes .
As someone living with diabetes, I know that finding balance during the holidays can be really challenging. Trying to loosen up and enjoy yourself, while keeping your blood sugar in check, is no easy feat. But managing blood sugar has never been smooth sailing. Its more like taking the role of captain 24/7 instead of turning on autopilot. With diabetes, its essential for long-term health to watch your blood sugar. Its also the key to feeling good, staying energetic, and being able to actually let go and enjoy yourself!
In my 11 years living with type 1 diabetes with many ups and downs and lots of trial and error I've been able to find what works best for me to maintain and control my blood sugar, especially during the holiday season. Here are some of my tips that can be helpful for managing both type 1 or type 2 diabetes .
1. Get familiar with the carb counts of foods you frequently eat or see
This tip is a real lifesaver when it comes to managing diabetes . Get to know your body and how certain foods affect your blood sugar. Sweet potatoes, brown rice, and fruit smoothie-bowls are my everyday staples, so Ive become really familiar with how much insulin I need to cover these foods. But kn Continue reading

Managing Type 2 Diabetes with CrossFit 4504

Managing Type 2 Diabetes with CrossFit 4504

The focus of our program here at CrossFit 4504 is about guiding our members to find wellness and avoid the current rate people are succumbing to chronic diseases such as metabolic diseases, lack of function in body e.g. unable to move themselves, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and a whole raft of others.
CrossFit the training methodology has a different focus than CrossFit the sport and thats an important differentiation to make. We are training and supporting our members to get more from life and to lead a better quality of life.
Lee’s story below is an example of how successful our program can be, when used in conjunction with a healthy diet, and working closely with allied health professionals to guide their progress. Having a medical condition doesn’t mean you have to or should opt out of physical activity, with the right team behind you and the right advice and support, you can improve from where you are now, and have better long term outcomes.
Coach Lisa
When I was young I put a lot of weight on very quickly.
In high school I was pretty active, I ran, played sports but in my first six months out of school I had a “uni student” diet and no exercise at all. The result of this sudden surge of inactivity, processed food and weight gain was that I would be diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes at twenty years old.
Twenty years later I still live with Diabetes but I’m proud to say that it’s managed well through a combination of food, medication and of course CrossFit.
It wasn’t always like this though.
At twenty, nothing will kill you. At least that’s what you subc Continue reading

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