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The Most Important Things To Know About Diabetes And Alcohol

The most important things to know about diabetes and alcohol

The most important things to know about diabetes and alcohol

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Tips & Tricks
We recently held our annual mySugr holiday celebration. What a good opportunity to talk about drinking alcohol with diabetes and the effect on blood sugar, right?
Reviewed for accuracy and updated December 18, 2017 — SKJ
Party time!
You can probably imagine it. Some snacks to nibble on, a live DJ spinning the (digital) wheels of steel, and some tasty adult beverages. In a situation like that, It’s all too easy to get caught up in the atmosphere and not think about your blood sugar. That’s totally natural – who wants to think about diabetes when you’re having a good time? I certainly don’t. But does drinking alcohol affect your diabetes and blood sugar? Is it something to be concerned about?
Pay Respect!
Here’s the deal. If you don’t pay some attention to alcohol and learn how it interacts with your diabetes, it will stop your party in one way or another, either during the dance-off or perhaps more commonly, hours later when you’re sound asleep and dreaming about your fancy moves. Cruelly, that’s when you’re least expecting it and when you’re at your most vulnerable.
Having diabetes is no reason to avoid drinking if it’s something you’d like to do. But you should understand how it works so you can do so safely. I’m not personally a big drinker, but I’ve done some digging and hope to share a few bits of useful information to help keep you safe.
We’re all different, but basics are basic…
One of the most important things I can share is that we’re all different, especially when it comes to our diabetes. Many pe Continue reading

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How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance and Diabetes?

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance and Diabetes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 29 million people in America have diabetes and 86 million have prediabetes. Insulin resistance is recognized as a predictor of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. But what causes insulin resistance?
In this NutritionFacts.org video, Dr. Michael Greger talks about how fat affects insulin resistance, and about how the most effective way to reduce insulin sensitivity is to reduce fat intake. We’ve also provided a summary of Dr. Greger’s main points below.
Insulin Resistance of People on High-Fat Diets vs. High-Carb Diets
In studies performed as early as the 1930s, scientists have noted a connection between diet and insulin intolerance. In one study, healthy young men were split into two groups. Half of the participants were put on a fat-rich diet, and the other half were put on a carb-rich diet. The high-fat group ate olive oil, butter, mayonnaise, and cream. The high-carb group ate pastries, sugar, candy, bread, baked potatoes, syrup, rice, and oatmeal.
Within two days, tests showed that the glucose intolerance had skyrocketed in the group eating the high-fat diet. This group had twice the blood sugar levels than the high-carb group. The test results showed that the higher the fat content of the diet, the higher the blood sugar levels would be.
What Is Insulin Resistance?
It turns out that as the amount of fat in the diet goes up, so does one’s blood sugar spikes. Athletes frequently carb-load before a race because they’re trying to build up fuel in their muscles. We break down starch into glucose in our digestive Continue reading

Type 2 diabetes and the diet that cured me

Type 2 diabetes and the diet that cured me

Why me? At 59 I was 10st 7lb, 5ft 7in, and had never been overweight. I ran and played cricket regularly and didn't drink alcohol excessively. Yet at a routine check-up I was told that I had type 2 diabetes. In 10 years I could be dependent on insulin, it could affect my sight, feet, ears, heart and I had a 36% greater chance of dying early.
In type 1 diabetes, the body produces none of the insulin that regulates our blood sugar levels. Very high glucose levels can damage the body's organs. Patients with type 2 diabetes, however, do produce insulin - just not enough to keep their glucose levels normal. Because I was fit and not overweight (obesity is a major risk factor in type 2 diabetes; however, a number of non-obese people, particularly members of south Asian communities, are also prone to it), my doctor told me I could control my condition with diet alone.
Desperate for information, I headed to the web, where I found a report about a research trial at Newcastle University led by Professor Roy Taylor. His research suggested type 2 diabetes could be reversed by following a daily 800-calorie diet for eight weeks.
When our bodies are deprived of normal amounts of food they consume their own fat reserves, with the fat inside organs used up first. The idea of Taylor's diet is to use up the fat that is clogging up the pancreas and preventing it from creating insulin, until normal glucose levels return. With my GP's blessing and a home glucose-testing kit, I began my experiment.
The diet was strict: three litres of water a day, three 200-calorie food supplements (soups and sha Continue reading

Emergency Preparedness: Diabetes Emergency Kit

Emergency Preparedness: Diabetes Emergency Kit

Recently, Hurricane Harvey has disastrously impacted Texas, including individuals with chronic medical conditions and disabilities. One man in particular recently shared his story of escaping the hurricane and wading through dangerous waters to retrieve his diabetes medications.
When disaster strikes whether it be a hurricane, earthquake, power outage or other emergency situation, preparedness is key. It’s important to become educated on the potential consequences of disaster situations as well as developing an emergency kit and disaster plan.
We recommend organizing a minimum of 7 days worth of supplies for a disaster situation for yourself and all the members of your family including pets.
Develop an Emergency Plan
Develop a comprehensive plan for emergency situations. Some important factors to consider:
Communication Plan: How will you connect with family, friends, and doctors?
Disaster Plan: Determine safe places in your home, family meeting spots, and what you’ll do if disaster strikes.
Make a disaster kit: Include all the items you’ll need in the event of an emergency. Continuing reading to see our full list!
Prepare to Stay and to Evacuate
When developing your emergency kit and plan, it’s important to consider two main scenarios. Firstly, you may be trapped in your home for an extended period of time. Do you have enough supplies in place in the event you’re unable to travel to a store? What if stores are out of supplies? Do you have everything you would need to stay in your home for an extended period of time? Particularly consider you should pay special at Continue reading

Why treating diabetes keeps getting more expensive

Why treating diabetes keeps getting more expensive

Laura Marston is one of the 1.25 million Americans who suffer from Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder in which a person's pancreas can't make insulin. She hoards vials of the life-saving medicine in her refrigerator to protect herself from the drug's rising prices. (Jorge Ribas/The Washington Post)
At first, the researchers who discovered insulin agonized about whether to patent the drug at all. It was 1921, and the team of biochemists and physicians based in Toronto was troubled by the idea of profiting from a medicine that had such widespread human value, one that could transform diabetes from a death sentence into a manageable disease.
Ultimately, they decided to file for a patent — and promptly sold it to the University of Toronto for $3, or $1 for each person listed. It was the best way, they believed, to ensure that no company would have a monopoly and patients would have affordable access to a safe, effective drug.
“Above all, these were discoverers who were trying to do a great humanitarian thing,” said historian Michael Bliss, “and they hoped their discovery was a kind of gift to humanity.”
But the drug also has become a gift to the pharmaceutical industry. A version of insulin that carried a list price of $17 a vial in 1997 is priced at $138 today. Another that launched two decades ago with a sticker price of $21 a vial has been increased to $255.
[This 90-year-old fight over insulin royalties reveals just how much has changed in medicine]
Seventy-five years after the original insulin patent expired — a point at which drug prices usually decline Continue reading

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