diabetestalk.net

The Lifestyle Changes That Can Cut Type 2 Diabetes Risk

The lifestyle changes that can cut type 2 diabetes risk

The lifestyle changes that can cut type 2 diabetes risk


The lifestyle changes that can cut type 2 diabetes risk
By Dr Rangan Chatterjee Doctor in the House
These are external links and will open in a new window
Type 2 diabetes affects approximately 3.5 million people in this country and is thought to cost the UK around 20bn per year in both direct and indirect costs.
This is a staggering amount of money spent on a condition largely caused by our lifestyle choices and environment.
On Doctor in the House, I try to help 39-year-old La-Vern. Her mother, Doreen, already has type 2 diabetes and is worried that La-Vern is going down the same route.
La-Vern is a busy, single mother who does two jobs and, as a result, is exhausted and stressed.
She has not yet crossed our diagnostic threshold where we would say she has type 2 diabetes, but her blood sugar and fasting insulin levels are not "normal" either. Her results suggested that she was on the road towards type 2 diabetes.
This is an ideal opportunity to practise true preventive medicine. Type 2 diabetes is a late event. By the time you get a diagnosis, things will have been going wrong in your body for many years.
La-Vern's symptoms of fatigue have already affected her quality of life. However, her lifestyle is not only causing her to feel unwell, but is driving her towards a type 2 diabetes diagnosis further down the line.
This is one of the big problems in medicine today - things are often said to be black or white, normal or abnormal - but what about optimal?
I am an advocate for trying to recognise problems before they happen. Why should we wait for people to get a Continue reading

Rate this article
Total 1 ratings
Improved pregnancy outcomes in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes but substantial clinic-to-clinic variations: a prospective nationwide study

Improved pregnancy outcomes in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes but substantial clinic-to-clinic variations: a prospective nationwide study


, Volume 60, Issue9 , pp 16681677 | Cite as
Improved pregnancy outcomes in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes but substantial clinic-to-clinic variations: a prospective nationwide study
The aim of this prospective nationwide study was to examine antenatal pregnancy care and pregnancy outcomes in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and to describe changes since 2002/2003.
This national population-based cohort included 3036 pregnant women with diabetes from 155 maternity clinics in England and Wales who delivered during 2015. The main outcome measures were maternal glycaemic control, preterm delivery (before 37weeks), infant large for gestational age (LGA), and rates of congenital anomaly, stillbirth and neonatal death.
Of 3036 women, 1563 (51%) had type 1, 1386 (46%) had type 2 and 87 (3%) had other types of diabetes. The percentage of women achieving HbA1c<6.5% (48mmol/mol) in early pregnancy varied greatly between clinics (median [interquartile range] 14.3% [7.722.2] for type 1, 37.0% [27.346.2] for type 2). The number of infants born preterm (21.7% vs 39.7%) and LGA (23.9% vs 46.4%) were lower for women with type 2 compared with type 1 diabetes (both p<0.001). The prevalence rates for congenital anomaly (46.2/1000 births for type 1, 34.6/1000 births for type 2) and neonatal death (8.1/1000 births for type 1, 11.4/1000 births for type 2) were unchanged since 2002/2003. Stillbirth rates are almost 2.5 times lower than in 2002/2003 (10.7 vs 25.8/1000 births for type 1, p=0.0012; 10.5 vs 29.2/1000 births for type 2, p=0.0091).
Stillbirth rates among women with ty Continue reading

Overcoming Diabetes Burnout

Overcoming Diabetes Burnout

By: Johanna Murray, Journalism Major, Western Michigan University
Kathryn Finton walks into the classroom on the first day of class looking confident and excited. Her new students shuffle in after her quietly; I am one of them.
I notice a little box attached to the belt loop on her pants. It resembles that of a pager straight out of the 90s. In today’s setting, the pager sticks out, uncommon and foreign to college students of the 2000s.
Professor Finton introduces herself to the class, and introduces the pager attached to her hip as well. The pager turns out not to be a cool gadget from the 90s. Instead, a monitor to track her type 1 diabetes.
After a brief explanation of the little box, to cure the curious minds of her students, she continues on with the class. Her diabetes all but forgotten to the people listening to her words. However, for Professor Finton, her diabetes is something that is never forgotten.
I came to learn that the summer of her 12th year was the beginning of a drastic change in her life. Finton and her younger sister had been wearing matching dresses to their grandparent’s house when her parents noticed that she looked too small in the dress that had fit her well not long before. She was also using the bathroom more frequently than normal. Worried, her parents took her to the hospital the next day.
Twenty pounds under weight, Kathryn was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Her mother, in tears, told her “everything is going to be okay.”
“It didn’t feel like everything was going to be okay,” said Finton.
Her doctor had to explain not only what Continue reading

UCalgary researcher signs deal to develop nanomedicines for treatment of Type 1 diabetes

UCalgary researcher signs deal to develop nanomedicines for treatment of Type 1 diabetes

Photo courtesy Cumming School of Medicine
When Dr. Pere Santamaria arrived in Calgary in 1992 to join the Cumming School of Medicine, he never could have imagined he would make a groundbreaking discovery that would lead to a spinoff company. “When I arrived, I found out that the grant money I was expecting hadn’t come through,” says Santamaria, a professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases and member of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases. “So I had an empty lab with no research assistants and no salary. I had to beg my supervisor to give me $10,000 to start my research.”
Despite the rocky start, Santamaria has achieved something many scientists dream of — making a discovery that has practical applications for health care. Santamaria’s discovery revolves around the use of nanoparticles coated in proteins to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.
“They can be modified for different diseases, such as Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis without compromising the entire immune system,” Santamaria explains. “Instead, they basically work to reset the immune system.”
Nanomedicine’s unique mechanism has the potential to disrupt the pharmaceutical industry entirely. Developing a new class of drugs is rare. With the assistance of Innovate Calgary, Santamaria started a company, Parvus Therapeutics Inc., to represent the technology and explore ways of bringing it to market. Announced in April 2017, Parvus entered into an exclusive deal with the Swiss pharma giant Novartis, hopefully leading Continue reading

Roundup: News from the Advanced Technologies & Treatments for Diabetes conference

Roundup: News from the Advanced Technologies & Treatments for Diabetes conference


Roundup: News from the Advanced Technologies & Treatments for Diabetes conference
This week in Paris, companies in the diabetes managment space came together at theAdvanced Technologies and Treatments for Diabetes conference to share news and, mostly, a lot of efficacy data. It's an exciting time for the space as closed-loop systems that allow people with diabetes to monitor their glucose continuously and automatically manage their insulin dosing get closer and closer to becoming a validated, regulated reality for people with Type 1 diabetes. We didn't make it out to Paris ourselves, but we're covering the news. We've written up some of the bigger stories from the conference earlier this week. Look below for a roundup of other digital health news from the show.
Nonprofit organizationT1D Exchangepublished a major study in Diabetes Care yesterday (and presented the research at the conference). The data re-affirms the FDA's recent clearance ofDexcom's CGM for insulin dosing. The study looked at 226 adult CGM users for six months. Of those, 149 dosed their insulin using the CGM and 77 used a fingerstick glucometer in addition, as is currently required for most CGMs. There was no difference in outcomes between the two groups.
"This study is an important step to support regulatory pathways for the automation of insulin delivery for people with type 1 diabetes, Dana Ball, executive director and co-founder of T1D Exchange, said in a statement. These data are supportive of the recent FDA decision to approve the Dexcom G5 indication for insulin dosing and removes a key obstacle Continue reading

No more pages to load

Popular Articles

  • 5 Diet Tweaks That Could Cut Your Diabetes Risk

    If someone you love has ever struggled with the scourge of diabetes, you know what a devastating disease it can be. Roughly 25.8 million Americans have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association, and pre-diabetes -- higher than normal blood glucose levels, but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes -- affects one in three U.S. adults over the age of 20. Diabetes is a leading ...

  • Yes! A Low-Carb Lifestyle Can be Healthy for Type 2 Diabetes

    Your body requires many things in order to be healthy: sleep, water, micronutrients such as vitamins and minerals, as well as the macronutrients protein and fat. What it doesn’t NEED, from a scientific perspective, is carbohydrates. While a plate of pasta may well be comfort food, it’s not a power food. Your body will turn that simple carbohydrate into glucose (a sugar), which will be burned b ...

  • Could you develop diabetes? This test examines FOUR lifestyle factors to assess your risk and what to do to manage the condition

    Diabetes is a global epidemic expected to be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030. The condition is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation – and places a huge strain on our health services. Yet type 2 form of the disease – which accounts for 90 per cent of cases – is largely preventable. Nine cases in 10 could be avoided, according t ...

  • Being Overweight Changes Your DNA, Increasing Risk Of Diabetes For Offspring

    Epigenetics is the study of how our behaviors and experiences can actually change our DNA, allowing us to pass on new traits to future generations. Recently, researchers revealed that obesity is able to cause epigenetic changes to our DNA which could have adverse health consequences for our future offspring. In what is being called the biggest study yet on the effect of body mass index (BMI) on DN ...

  • USF Study: Inexpensive Drug Could Cut Type 2 Diabetes Cases By 30 Percent

    According to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes – many of them the Type 2 form of the disease. That's where the body doesn't produce enough insulin on its own. But another 86 million adults have prediabetes, with up to a third at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes within five years. Now while expe ...

  • What is diabetes? How diet, lifestyle and even ethnicity can affect DEADLY disease

    Diabetes cases are said to have soared by 60 per cent in the last decade, and it now affects over 3 million people in the UK. According to studies undertaken by Diabetes UK, this number will rise to 5 million by 2025. Worryingly, it is thought that there are 900,000 people in the UK who don’t yet know they already have diabetes. Dr Adam Simon, chief medical officer at PushDoctor.co.uk, has spoke ...

  • Suffering from diabetes? These five apps can help you manage your lifestyle better

    Diabetes requires long-term treatment, often spanning over many years. This makes adherence to a blood sugar-controlling lifestyle, such as healthy eating, regular physical activity, and timely medication, a challenge. It is common for patients to make errors in their diabetes management, by either binge eating carbohydrates on a particular day, not exercising enough, or forgetting to take their m ...

  • Ask.Screen.Know: A Chat With Rev Run And Justine Simmons About Diabetes And How Black Families Can Maintain A Healthy Lifestyle

    Ask.Screen.Know: A Chat With Rev Run And Justine Simmons About Diabetes And How Black Families Can Maintain A Healthy Lifestyle We spend a virtual visit at Run's House and learn how his family are staying healthy! Diabetes has always been a scary word for me. Growing up, the phrase diabetes runs in our family was drilled into my head over and over again, whilst watching my aunt inject herself ...

  • You can avoid pre-diabetes with small changes to your diet

    Charity Diabetes UK estimates that up to 11.5 million people in the UK are at a high risk of developing it. This statistic is backed up by research published last year in online medical journal BMJ Open which estimates a third of UK adults are at the stage known as pre-diabetes. If you’re one of them or think you might be, the main thing to know is that pre-diabetes can be reversed. In fact, it ...

Related Articles