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'The Last Team I Played On Would Have Been England Youths With Lee Westwood'

'The last team I played on would have been England Youths with Lee Westwood'

'The last team I played on would have been England Youths with Lee Westwood'

Historically Great Britain & Ireland have been the whipping boys in the PGA Cup as the bigger and better American club pros would routinely give us a bit of a going over.
It’s no great surprise given the pool of players that each team has to pick from. As the GB&I skipper told us in the preview ‘we start with 460 players at regionals, they start off at 4,000’.
The last time GB&I won back-to-back matches it was 1984, since then we have only come out on top twice which included two years ago at CordeValle. There Niall Kearney, in the last singles out on Sunday, got up and down from behind the 18th green to edge the visitors over the line. Never before, the matches began in 1973, had the Americans lost at home.
Now we have won two on the trot again thanks to an incredible effort in the singles last weekend. On Saturday night the visitors had just won three of the four foursomes to get back within a point, the following day they won just one of the 10 singles – GB&I ran out 16-10 winners.
At the heart of the home effort was Robert Coles. The 45-year-old, from Maylands Golf & Country Club in Essex, knew he would be playing in the PGA Cup last October. The European Tour veteran finished second behind Matthew Cort at the PGA Play-Offs at Saunton, and ahead of Greig Hutcheon of Scotland, as the three of them booked their places in Albert MacKenzie’s side for Foxhills.
Coles wouldn’t say as much, he’s far too modest and self-deprecating, but his efforts in Surrey were pretty heroic. After a disappointing start he then won his next four matches, being one of three playe Continue reading

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Sex With Diabetes: Mens Awkward Bedroom Questions, Answered

Sex With Diabetes: Mens Awkward Bedroom Questions, Answered


Sex With Diabetes: Mens Awkward Bedroom Questions, Answered
Diabetes can lead to erectile dysfunction, reduced libido, low testosterone, and other sex problems in men. Here's how to address them.
Having sex when you have diabetes may affect your libido, among other issues.
Youve probably heard that having diabetes can impact sex. After all, high blood glucose affects your whole body, even your most private parts. For a lot of people, their sexual life is important, says Evan Sisson, PharmD, CDE , an associate professor at the school of pharmacy at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, adding that checkups should leave time for an open conversation about a patients sexual life and concerns.
Why Arent My Erections Like They Used to Be?
For years, it has been well known that erectile dysfunction (ED) is more common in men who have diabetes . A study published in July 2017 in the journalDiabetic Medicine offers clues on the prevalence of this issue: Men with diabetes are 3.5 times more likely to have ED than men without diabetes.
High blood glucose damages nerves, meaning the lets have sex signal doesnt make it to the penis. It also narrows the peniss blood vessels so you dont get enough blood to the penis for an erection.
You cant reverse damage to nerves and blood vessels in your penis, but you can prevent further damage by lowering your A1C , says urologist Ajay Nangia , bacholorof medicine and bachelor of surgery, a professor of urology at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City.
Treatments for ED include pills, such as Viagra (sildenafil) , Continue reading

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes: Is There a Link?

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes: Is There a Link?


Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Type 2 Diabetes: Is There a Link?
1Respiratory Division, Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
2Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Edited by: Sigrid Veasey, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Reviewed by: Vsevolod Polotsky, Johns Hopkins University, USA; Sigrid Veasey, University of Pennsylvania, USA
*Correspondence: Sushmita Pamidi, Respiratory Division, McGill University Health Centre, Room L4.05, 687 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A1A1. e-mail: [email protected]
This article was submitted to Frontiers in Sleep and Chronobiology, a specialty of Frontiers in Neurology.
Received 2012 Jun 16; Accepted 2012 Jul 24.
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and subject to any copyright notices concerning any third-party graphics etc.
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Type 2 diabetes is a chronic illness that is increasing in epidemic proportions worldwide. Major factors contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes include obesity and poor lifestyle habits (e.g., excess dietary intake and limited physical activity). Despite the proven efficacy of lifestyle interventions and the use of multiple pharmacological agents, the economic and public health burden of type 2 diabetes remains substantial. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a treatable sleep disorder that is pervasi Continue reading

Are These Popular Diets Good for Diabetes?

Are These Popular Diets Good for Diabetes?

While many fad diets spell trouble for someone with type 2 diabetes, other popular diets can help you eat well for diabetes. Learn about the Paleo diet, Mediterranean diet, and more.
Popular diets can come and go like fashion trends, but eating right to manage type 2 diabetes is a lifelong commitment. While some fad diets may be unhealthy for you, other popular diets have been proven to help people with type 2 diabetes reduce the need for diabetes medications or the risk for complications like heart disease.
Choosing a Healthy Diet for Diabetes
Whether you’re looking for a diet to meet a short-term goal like weight loss or a long-term one like managing your type 2 diabetes without drugs, it takes some research to find the diabetes diet that’s best for you.
Angela Ginn, RD, LDN, CDE, nutrition education coordinator at the University of Maryland Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology in Baltimore and a spokesperson for the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, says the first step is to take an honest look at yourself.
“It’s about finding food or an eating plan that fits your lifestyle and you can stick to for six months or more,” Ginn says. “If you can only follow the diet for a few weeks or so, it’s probably not the right option for you.”
Another warning sign that you may not be following the right diet for type 2 diabetes, Ginn says, is if the diet eliminates or severely restricts an entire food group, like carbohydrates. “You should have a wide variety of food options,” she says. Those options should include whole grains, fruits, vegetables, low-f Continue reading

Diabetes, Bones - Diabetes Self-Management

Diabetes, Bones - Diabetes Self-Management


Osteoporosis is the most common type of bone disorder, affecting an estimated 10 million Americans. It is a chronic condition characterized by reduced bone strength, low bone mass, and a higher risk of bone fracture, especially at the hip, spine, and wrist. If you are over the age of 50, there is a 55% chance that you are at increased risk for osteoporosis or have it already. The risk of osteoporosis increases with age; it is not, however, limited to older individuals.
Osteoporosis can be prevented or slowed down, but once damage to the bone has taken place, it can be difficult to reverse. Bone fractures are the main consequence of osteoporosis, and they are associated with lasting disability after they occur, especially hip fractures in older people.
For reasons that are still unclear, people with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes experience a higher incidence of bone fracture than the general population, even though people with Type 2 diabetes tend to have above-average bone density. It is especially important, then, for people with diabetes to know about osteoporosis, to have their risk of fracture evaluated by medical professionals, and to find out what they can do to make their bones as strong and healthy as possible.
One way health-care providers evaluate a persons risk of osteoporosis is to do a bone mineral density (BMD) test. The most common test uses x-ray beams, is painless, and can be done in a matter of minutes.
BMD is a core indicator of bone strength. A test for BMD measures the amount of a mineral, usually calcium, in a bone. This measurement is then com Continue reading

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