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The Full-Fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

The Full-Fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

The Full-Fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

If you melt at the creaminess of full-fat yogurt, read on.
A new study finds the dairy fats found in milk, yogurt and cheese may help protect against Type 2 diabetes.
The research, published in the journal Circulation, included 3,333 adults. Beginning in the late 1980s, researchers took blood samples from the participants and measured circulating levels of biomarkers of dairy fat in their blood. Then, over the next two decades, the researchers tracked who among the participants developed diabetes.
"People who had the most dairy fat in their diet had about a 50 percent lower risk of diabetes" compared with people who consumed the least dairy fat, says Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, who is also an author of the study.
The study does not prove a cause and effect, but it builds on a body of evidence suggesting that dairy fat may have protective effects, both in cutting the risk of diabetes and in helping people control body weight.
"For a long time we've had this notion that saturated fat [the kind found in dairy products] is always bad for you," says Mark DeBoer, a pediatrician at the University of Virginia.
But this assumption is being questioned. As we've previously reported, DeBoer has studied the connection between dairy fat and children's body weight. And he published a surprising finding.
"It appears that children who have a higher intake of whole milk or 2 percent milk gain less weight over time" compared with kids who consume skim or nonfat dairy products, explains DeBoer.
And there's some evidence Continue reading

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Almond Milk and Diabetes

Almond Milk and Diabetes

Almond Milk in a Diabetes Diet
Looking for a healthy substitute for cow's milk or soy?
Diabetics in particular should consider almond milk. You can buy or make the drink yourself with ground almonds and water. Add non-calorie sweetener, if you like.
In addition to the variety of benefits in a diabetes diet, almond milk is dairy-free and vegan. It is also an excellent replacement for those that are lactose-intolerant.
Like regular milk, it contains protein, calcium and Vitamin D. When you purchase or make unsweetened almond milk, the total calories for an 8 ounce (1 cup) serving is less than half that of skim milk (40 calories vs. 90 calories). It also has about 1/6th the number of carbohydrate grams (2 grams vs. 13 grams).
Almond milk in a diabetes diet can help you lose or maintain weight, and may potentially prevent dangerous rises in blood sugar levels. This is due to its lower carbohydrate count and reduced calories compared to regular milk.
You can make almond milk by straining water through crushed almonds, to create a milky, nut-flavored liquid (directions below). People enjoy almond milk as a beverage and/or as a substitute for milk in recipes.
Almonds and Diabetes
Did you know that consumption of almonds can improve your diabetes health?
Medical studies have shown that consuming one ounce (approximately 10-12 almonds) before a meal may result in 30% lower blood glucose levels thereafter in diabetics, compared with 7% lower sugar levels for non-diabetics.
Over time, the benefits of almonds on diabetics are worth noting.
People with Type 2 diabetes who had one ounce Continue reading

Diabetes and Hearing Loss

Diabetes and Hearing Loss

A Surprising Complication
Ed Weinsberg wasn’t surprised when he developed burning sensations in his feet in 2006. His health care provider had told him he might experience this sign of peripheral neuropathy, a side effect of his recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Medication helped reduce the sensations. But a few years ago, Ed, 62, a former rabbi and author living in Sarasota, Florida, began to experience frustrating problems with his hearing.
“Every sentence began with, ‘What did you say?’ ” he says. “My ear, nose, and throat doctor wasn’t sure what was behind it.” By then Ed had already lost 50 percent of his hearing in his left ear. “But I suspected there might be a connection with my diabetes. I know it reduces blood flow to other parts of the body.”
Ed was onto something. Research shows that people with uncontrolled type 1 or type 2 diabetes are twice as likely as others to experience hearing loss. In a large study of people ages 20–69, researchers from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases found a strong association between diabetes and hearing problems, emerging as early as age 30.
A recent study from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit reached much the same conclusion. Researchers found that in women younger than 60, hearing was worse among those with type 1 or type 2 diabetes compared to women without diabetes, according to study coauthor Kathleen Yaremchuk, M.D., chair of otolaryngology at the hospital. And women ages 60–75 with poorly controlled diabetes had significantly worse hearing than those whose diabetes w Continue reading

A1 beta-casein milk protein and other environmental pre-disposing factors for type 1 diabetes

A1 beta-casein milk protein and other environmental pre-disposing factors for type 1 diabetes

Globally type 1 diabetes incidence is increasing. It is widely accepted that the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes is influenced by environmental factors in people with specific human leukocyte antigen haplotypes. We propose that a complex interplay between dietary triggers, permissive gut factors and potentially other influencing factors underpins disease progression. We present evidence that A1 β-casein cows’ milk protein is a primary causal trigger of type 1 diabetes in individuals with genetic risk factors. Permissive gut factors (for example, aberrant mucosal immunity), intervene by impacting the gut’s environment and the mucosal barrier. Various influencing factors (for example, breastfeeding duration, exposure to other dietary triggers and vitamin D) modify the impact of triggers and permissive gut factors on disease. The power of the dominant trigger and permissive gut factors on disease is influenced by timing, magnitude and/or duration of exposure. Within this framework, removal of a dominant dietary trigger may profoundly affect type 1 diabetes incidence. We present epidemiological, animal-based, in vitro and theoretical evidence for A1 β-casein and its β-casomorphin-7 derivative as dominant causal triggers of type 1 diabetes. The effects of ordinary milk containing A1 and A2 β-casein and milk containing only the A2 β-casein warrant comparison in prospective trials.
Type 1 diabetes, one of the most common chronic diseases among children,1 is characterised by the selective loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells in genetically susceptible individua Continue reading

'She's feeling terrible': Pregnant Danielle Lloyd 'has been forced to clear her schedule after being left bed-ridden with gestational diabetes'

'She's feeling terrible': Pregnant Danielle Lloyd 'has been forced to clear her schedule after being left bed-ridden with gestational diabetes'

She's been forced to scrap her work schedule for this week.
And it has now been revealed that Danielle Lloyd has reportedly been left bed-ridden with gestational diabetes and is feeling 'terrible'.
The 33-year-old star - who is expecting her fourth child, her first with her fiancé Michael O'Neill - is said to have been told to rest by her doctor.
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A source told The Sun Online: 'She’s been told by her doctor that she’s got to rest.
'Last night she wanted to make sure she could do her work commitments but her condition has left her feeling terrible and she’s laid up in bed.
'She’s feeling really bad. She doesn’t want to miss this but she has to.'
MailOnline has contacted Danielle's spokesperson for comment.
This comes after Danielle revealed she had been struck down with a mystery illness and was worrying about her health.
She shared in her OK! magazine column: 'I haven’t been very good at all this week. I’ve been feeling really poorly and I’ve had to go to the doctors twice because I don’t know what’s wrong with me.
'I know doctors tell you not to Google stuff but I did and I read about diabetes and how it can make you go into early labour and I was like, "Oh my God" it just makes you panic, I was quite frightened.'
Danielle looked radiant when she showed off her blossoming baby bump in a striking scarlet onsie in a cosy bedroom Instagram post on Monday.
The former glamour model was quite the stunning lady in red as she struck a pose caressing her tummy.
The crimson garment's plunging neckline teased her ample assets.
But she put the Continue reading

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