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The Effect Of High-intensity Breastfeeding On Postpartum Glucose Tolerance In Women With Recent Gestational Diabetes

The effect of high-intensity breastfeeding on postpartum glucose tolerance in women with recent gestational diabetes

The effect of high-intensity breastfeeding on postpartum glucose tolerance in women with recent gestational diabetes


The effect of high-intensity breastfeeding on postpartum glucose tolerance in women with recent gestational diabetes
Although breastfeeding is expected to reduce the incidence of diabetes in women with gestational diabetes, the effect has not been clearly confirmed. We examined whether or not high-intensity breastfeeding reduces the incidence of abnormal glucose tolerance and investigated the effect of high-intensity breastfeeding on insulin resistance during the first year postpartum in Japanese women with current gestational diabetes.
In this retrospective study, we included women with gestational diabetes who underwent postpartum 75g oral glucose tolerance test during the first year (12-14months) postpartum from 2009 to 2011 at a single tertiary perinatal care center in Japan. High-intensity breastfeeding was defined as the condition in which infants were fed by breastfeeding alone or 80% or more of the volume. We investigated the effect of high-intensity breastfeeding on the prevalence of postpartum abnormal glucose tolerance and the postpartum homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), after controlling for confounders, including prepregnancy obesity and weight changes during pregnancy and postpartum.
Among 88 women with gestational diabetes, 46 (52%) had abnormal glucose tolerance during the postpartum period. High-intensity breastfeeding women (n = 70) were significantly less likely to have abnormal glucose tolerance than non-high-intensity breastfeeding women (n = 18) (46% vs. 78%, p = 0.015). High-intensity breastfeeding was also associat Continue reading

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Broccoli extract may lower blood sugar among some with diabetes, study finds

Broccoli extract may lower blood sugar among some with diabetes, study finds


Nearly 30 million people in the United States have type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases the chances of developing diabetes. Both obesity and diabetes are linked to cancer .
Findings from a new study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine suggest that sulforaphane, a phytochemical that has shown strong cancer-preventive actions in lab and clinical studies, might also reduce some of the harmful effects of type 2 diabetes in obese adults.
Sulforaphane is useful not only for cancer prevention but it also demonstrates anti-diabetes and many other activities, says Jed Fahey, ScD, Director of the Cullman Chemoprotection Center at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and one of the authors on the study.
Sulforaphane comes from broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables such as kale, cabbage, and radishes. It contributes to the vegetables slightly pungent aroma and flavor.
Both obesity and diabetes increase the risk of cancers. Read more in Linking Diabetes to Cancer: Changes for Prevention.
The liver of a healthy person naturally produces glucose, a type of sugar, and releases it into the blood. But the liver of a person with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes produces as much as three times the normal amount of glucose.
A team of scientists from Sweden, Switzerland, and the U.S. set out to learn what effects sulforaphane has on liver glucose production and blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. They chose sulforaphane out of more than 3,800 drugs and natural products because the pattern of genes that sulforaphane switches on or o Continue reading

Diabetes Management in Children Engaging In Physical Activity

Diabetes Management in Children Engaging In Physical Activity

Children with diabetes are often sidelined during team sports and planned exercise.
Physical activity is universally recognized as an important component of a healthy lifestyle. Regular exercise improves cardiovascular outcomes, improves insulin sensitivity, and improves glycemic control in patients with diabetes. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that all children, including those with diabetes, engage in 60 minutes of physical activity each day starting as young as 5 years old. Unfortunately, studies have shown that children and adolescents with diabetes are less physically active than those without diabetes.
There are several factors that may contribute to this difference in activity levels including: concerns of altered glycemic control during exercise, the need for closer monitoring, fear of being ostracized, and the fear of experiencing a hypoglycemic event. It is important that children and adolescents, especially those with diabetes mellitus, are encouraged to play sports, get regular exercise and not feel ashamed of their chronic condition. With a proper understanding of the blood glucose fluctuations that occur during exercise and a comprehensive diabetes care plan, children and adolescents can engage in sports and physical activity safely.
Understanding glucose metabolism and hormonal changes that occur during exercise is essential for the management of glycemic control in children and adolescents. The major sources of fuel for the body during exercise are carbohydrates and fat. Glucose is obtained from carbohydrates in the diet and is stored as Continue reading

Exercise guidelines for gestational diabetes mellitus

Exercise guidelines for gestational diabetes mellitus


Exercise guidelines for gestational diabetes mellitus
Cliantha Padayachee, Jeff S Coombes, Physical Activity and Health, the School of Human Movement Studies and the Centre for Research on Exercise, the University of Queensland, St Lucia QLD 4072, Australia
Author contributions: Padayachee C and Coombes JS equally contributed to this paper.
Correspondence to: Jeff S Coombes, PhD, Physical Activity and Health, the School of Human Movement Studies and the Centre for Research on Exercise, the University of Queensland, Blair Drive, St Lucia QLD 4072, Australia. [email protected]
Telephone: +61-7-33656767 Fax: +61-7-33656877
Received 2014 Aug 28; Revised 2015 Jan 19; Accepted 2015 Apr 27.
Copyright The Author(s) 2015. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved.
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide. This disease has many detrimental consequences for the woman, the unborn foetus and child. The management of GDM aims to mediate the effects of hyperglycaemia by controlling blood glucose levels. Along with pharmacology and dietary interventions, exercise has a powerful potential to assist with blood glucose control. Due to the uncertainty of risks and benefits of exercise during pregnancy, women tend to avoid exercise. However, under adequate supervision exercise is both safe and beneficial in the treatment of GDM. Therefore it is vital that exercise is incorporated into the continuum of care for women with GDM. Medical doctors should be able to refer t Continue reading

50 Registered Dietitians Share Diabetes Diet & Lifestyle Tips

50 Registered Dietitians Share Diabetes Diet & Lifestyle Tips


A1: One of the best ways I recommend to clients to keep their energy up while managing their diabetes is to included 3 to 4 food groups with each meal or snack. For instance, if they are planning a mid morning snack, we discuss the need to include a healthy fat and protein for satiety as well as complex carbs for energy and fruits or vegetables for fiber! I usually recommend a plain Greek yogurt with a tablespoon of powdered peanut butter with celery sticks and a handful of high fiber cereal. This combination also provides a variety of textures that increases their satisfaction with their snack choice as well.
A2: I would encourage the diabetic to work closely with their treatment team, specifically their dietitian, to figure out unique combinations of foods they enjoy to include in their diet. For instance, if my client is stuck on grilled chicken, broccoli and a side salad, I would show them how we can use those foods in combination with another food, such as a whole grain tortilla, to create a new combination that is still made from their base comfort foods.
A3: A plant based diet can definitely work as part of a diabetic friendly meal plan. However, you need to work with a professional to help ensure you are meeting your protein needs as well as vitamin B12. I also encourage my clients interested in plant based eating to focus on incorporating nutrient dense foods, such as nuts, that help provide protein, fats and are a low source of carbohydrates. This makes a great accompaniment to dinner, such as a walnut pesto with garbanzo beans and zucchini noodles!
I recomme Continue reading

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