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The Effect Of A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet Versus A Low-glycemic Index Diet On Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus


The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus
Westman et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2008
Dietary carbohydrate is the major determinant of postprandial glucose levels, and several clinical studies have shown that low-carbohydrate diets improve glycemic control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a diet lower in carbohydrate would lead to greater improvement in glycemic control over a 24-week period in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Eighty-four community volunteers with obesity and type 2 diabetes were randomized to either a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (<20 g of carbohydrate daily; LCKD) or a low-glycemic, reduced-calorie diet (500 kcal/day deficit from weight maintenance diet; LGID). Both groups received group meetings, nutritional supplementation, and an exercise recommendation. The main outcome was glycemic control, measured by hemoglobin A1c.
Forty-nine (58.3%) participants completed the study. Both interventions led to improvements in hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and weight loss. The LCKD group had greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c (-1.5% vs. -0.5%, p = 0.03), body weight (-11.1 kg vs. -6.9 kg, p = 0.008), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+5.6 mg/dL vs. 0 mg/dL, p < 0.001) compared to the LGID group. Diabetes medications were reduced or eliminated in 95.2% of LCKD vs. 62% of LGID participants (p < 0.01).
Dietary modification led to improvements in glycemic control and medication reduction/elimination in mo Continue reading

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What to Know About Diabetes Prevention Programs

What to Know About Diabetes Prevention Programs


Thanks in part to the YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program, 41-year-old Erin Rothermel was able to lose 60 pounds and reduce his blood pressure, among other health improvements.
Eric Rothermel, now 41, has always been mindful of his health. A tobacco control professional at the YMCA in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, he knows the importance of following a healthy diet, exercising, and watching your weight. But when he turned 39, he realized that some of his habits, like his waning physical activity, were beginning to catch up with him: His weight had crept up, and he could feel his energy levels plummeting.
When I weighed 282 pounds, I could feel it by the end of the day, Rothermel says. I was dragging.
Based on his weight, Rothermels colleague, who also happened to be Rothermels lifestyle coach, Megan Maurer, gave him a diabetes risk assessment questionnaire. The questionnaire showed that because of risk factors like a family history of diabetes and his body mass index (BMI) Eric was at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. She suggested that he try the YMCAs Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) .
To be completely honest, I wasnt thrilled about it, Rothermel says of the yearlong program. I knew what to do, and I knew I could get this under control. However, I wasnt doing anything about it.
Despite his skepticism, Rothermel joined the program.
How Diabetes Prevention Programs May Help Change the Course of Your Health
While every DPP has its own distinct features, the overall aim of these programs is to help people with prediabetes avoid developing full-blown type 2 diabetes.
Th Continue reading

Impact of menopause and diabetes on atherogenic lipid profile: is it worth to analyse lipoprotein subfractions to assess cardiovascular risk in women?

Impact of menopause and diabetes on atherogenic lipid profile: is it worth to analyse lipoprotein subfractions to assess cardiovascular risk in women?

Abstract
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women at advanced age, who are affected a decade later compared to men. Cardiovascular risk factors in women are not properly investigated nor treated and events are frequently lethal. Both menopause and type 2 diabetes substantially increase cardiovascular risk in the female sex, promoting modifications on lipid metabolism and circulating lipoproteins. Lipoprotein subfractions suffer a shift after menopause towards a more atherogenic lipid profile, consisted of hypertriglyceridemia, lower levels of both total high density lipoprotein (HDL) and its subfraction HDL2, but also higher levels of HDL3 and small low-density lipoprotein particles. This review discusses the impact of diabetes and menopause to the lipid profile, challenges in lipoprotein subfractions determination and their potential contribution to the cardiovascular risk assessment in women. It is still unclear whether lipoprotein subfraction changes are a major driver of cardiometabolic risk and which modifications are predominant. Prospective trials with larger samples, methodological standardizations and pharmacological approaches are needed to clarify the role of lipoprotein subfractions determination on cardiovascular risk prediction and intervention planning in postmenopausal women, with or without DM.
Background
Cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly coronary artery disease (CAD) [1], is a major cause of death in women, who develop it about 10 years later then men [2]. Traditional risk factors are present at a high frequency in individuals Continue reading

How NOT to treat type 2diabetes

How NOT to treat type 2diabetes


Nephrologist. Special interest in type 2 diabetes reversal and intermittent fasting. Founder of Intensive Dietary Management Program.
By the mid 1990s, the landmark DCCT trial has established the paradigm of glucotoxicity, in type 1 but not in type 2 diabetes. Still euphoric from the trials success, it seemed only a matter of time before tight blood glucose control was proven beneficial in type 2 diabetes as well.
Nobody stopped to consider exactly how giving insulin to hyperinsulinemic patients was going to help. Nobody paused to consider that insulin toxicity might outweigh glucotoxicity. So, borrowing heavily from the type 1 diabetes playbook, the use of insulin is increasingly used for type 2 diabetes as well.
Over the last decade, the number of patients using insulin rose 50% as almost 1/3 of diabetic patients in the United States use some form of insulin overall. This is slightly horrifying, considering that 9095% of diabetes in the United States is T2D, where the use of insulin is highly questionable.
In particular, the priority was to reduce cardiovascular disease. While type 2 diabetes is associated with numerous complications including nerve, kidney and eye damage, the morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular diseases dwarfed those by an order of magnitude. Simply put, most diabetic patients died of cardiovascular disease.
The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes study, known as the UKPDS, was going to be the study that would prove the benefits of intensive blood glucose control. Almost 4000 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients were randoml Continue reading

Is broccoli a secret weapon against diabetes? Extract of the vegetable may help patients regulate their blood sugar levels

Is broccoli a secret weapon against diabetes? Extract of the vegetable may help patients regulate their blood sugar levels


Research has found eating or drinking broccoli in the form of juice could help
Controlling diabetes is a huge expense for the NHS around 10% of its budget
Lifestyle changes in particular controlling obesity - helps stop the condition
Broccoli could be key to treating diabetes as a compound in the vegetable helps to lower blood sugar levels.
Research has found that eating or drinking broccoli in the form of juice could help stop type 2 diabetes.
Controlling diabetes is a huge expense for the NHS around 10 per cent of its total budget affecting 3.9 million people.
Lifestyle changes in particular controlling obesity - is an important way to stop the disease.
But in the short term for many, there are problems with existing drug treatments.
Research has found eating or drinking broccoli in the form of juice could stop type 2 diabetes
Metformin a blood-sugar lowering drug most commonly used for the condition -cannot be taken by around 15 per cent of sufferers because of its effect on their kidneys.
Professor Anders Rosengren, of Lund University Diabetes Centre in Sweden, said: 'Since sulforaphane has very few side effects and can easily be provided as a broccoli shake or drink - for example - it has the potential to become an important compliment to existing treatment options for type 2 diabetes.
'We will now work to make broccoli sprout extract available to produce as a functional food.'
The death sentence caused by poverty: Three-year-old Chinese boy whose head has ballooned in size will die because his parents cannot pay for life-saving surgery
He said it Continue reading

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