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The Difference Between Hypoglycemia And Hyperglycemia

The Difference Between Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia

The Difference Between Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia

Diabetes is a condition which is known to elevate the levels of blood glucose levels in the body of the patient. But there are times when the level of blood glucose either becomes too high or too low. When the blood glucose is too high, the condition is called hyperglycemia and when it is low beyond a certain level, it is called hypoglycemia. In this article, we shall analyze and study the differences between the two conditions. So, join in for the article “The Difference Between Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia.”
Symptoms of Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia
Meaning of Hyperglycemia Versus Hypoglycemia
Let us first understand the difference in the meaning of the two terms:
Hyperglycemia refers to very high blood glucose levels in a diabetic patient. In fact, the level of fasting blood sugar is more than 126 mg per dl while the random blood glucose level is somewhat more than 200 mg per dl.
Hypoglycemia, on the other hand, refers to extremely low levels of blood glucose levels in a diabetes patient. In this case, the patient experiences a fasting blood glucose level of up to 126 mg per dl while the normal level of blood glucose is less than even 70 mg per dl. There are many other differences between the two terms which are explained as below:
Symptoms of Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia
Another difference in the two types of the condition is with reference to the signs and symptoms of the two. Following are the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia:
Warning Signs of Hyperglycemia
Following are the symptoms of high blood glucose levels:
Increase in fatigue and we Continue reading

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'Alarming' rise in cancer rates driven by diabetes, obesity

'Alarming' rise in cancer rates driven by diabetes, obesity

New research crunches the numbers on diabetes- and obesity-related cancers and projects a steep rise in diagnosed cases.
Researchers at several institutions worldwide — including Imperial College London in the United Kingdom and the International Agency for Research on Cancer of the World Health Organization (WHO) in Lyon, France — have recently established that cancers related to metabolic diseases, especially diabetes and obesity, have an increasingly high incidence.
According to the team's data, 5.6 percent of all cancer cases throughout the world in 2012 were linked to pre-existing diabetes and a high body mass index (BMI), which is defined as over 25 kilograms per square meter.
Of this total, 3.9 percent of cases were attributable to diabetes — almost twice as many cases as were related to a high BMI.
Lead study author Dr. Jonathan Pearson-Stuttard and colleagues also worked out the estimates for the probable incidence of cancers related to diabetes and other metabolic disease in the next few years, and their prognosis is not encouraging.
The researchers' study findings were published yesterday in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal.
Diabetes, high BMI increasingly dangerous
According to reports published last year in The Lancet, around 422 million adults worldwide live with diabetes, and 2.01 billion adults are overweight or obese.
These numbers are particularly concerning, since diabetes and obesity are established risk factors for many different types of cancer, such as colorectal and pancreatic cancer, as well as cancer of the liver and gallbladder, b Continue reading

Reach your goals with our proven program

Reach your goals with our proven program

Participants who
followed our type 2 menu
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usual care
Participants also
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of 6.6% as compared to 7.5%
for usual care while showing
greater improvements in HDL
(good) cholesterol and
triglyceride levels
72% of participants
reduced or eliminated
their use of insulin
A recent review of 10 commercial weight loss programs by researchers at Johns Hopkins published in the June issue of Obesity Reviews Journal‡, found that only those individuals with type 2 diabetes following the Jenny Craig program reduced hemoglobin A1c -- a three-month average of blood sugar concentrations -- more than weight loss counseling at 12 months.
Jenny Craig was recommended as one option due to its strong evidence to support diabetes benefits.
Take the guesswork out of diabetes meal planning with our easy to follow, calorie + carbohydrate controlled type 2 menu that gives you the right balance of nutrients to lose weight, yet has a variety of delicious flavors to keep you excited about what you’re eating.
Your dedicated personal consultant designs strategies to help you reach your weight loss goals and hit your diabetes targets, while giving you weekly one-on-one support, either in person or over the phone.
In an independent study Jenny Craig participants following the lower carbohydrate menu for diabetes lost 3x more weight than those receiving usual care, achieved a lower HbA1c of 6.6% as compared to 7.5% for usual care, while showing greater improvements in HDL (good) cholesterol and triglycerides.† Continue reading

Diabetes pill might replace injection to control blood sugar

Diabetes pill might replace injection to control blood sugar

An injectable class of diabetes medication — called glucagon-like peptide-1 or GLP-1 — might one day be available in pill form, research suggests.
Based on the results of a global phase 2 clinical trial, the study authors reported a significant drop in blood sugar levels for people on the oral medication, and no significant increase in low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) compared to a placebo over six months.
The findings also showed that people taking the highest dose of the pill lost a large amount of weight — about 15 pounds — compared to a weight loss of fewer than 3 pounds for people on the inactive placebo pill.
The research was funded by Novo Nordisk, the company that makes the drug, called oral semaglutide.
"Semaglutide could transform diabetes treatment," said Dr. Robert Courgi, an endocrinologist at Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y.
"Glucagon-like peptide receptor agonists are agents that are highly recommended according to diabetes guidelines, but rarely used because they require injection. Most patients prefer a pill," Courgi explained.
Dr. Joel Zonszein, director of the clinical diabetes center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, agreed that these new findings were exciting.
"This medication looks pretty good. The high dose matched the [injection] version. There was low hypoglycemia. It controls blood glucose. There was weight loss and it's not an injection. This is the same molecule that's been shown [as an injection] to decrease cardiovascular mortality," Zonszein said.
"It has all the ingredients for an excellent medication. If this Continue reading

Add These To Your Atta (Flour) To Make It Diabetes-Friendly

Add These To Your Atta (Flour) To Make It Diabetes-Friendly

Expert-reviewed by Ashwini S.Kanade, Registered Dietician and Certified Diabetes Educator with 17 years of experience.
Fact-checked by Aditya Nar, B.Pharm, MSc. Public Health and Health Economics.
In diabetes, you indeed are what you eat. This is all the more critical when it comes to choosing to right kind of atta (or flour).
As with everything else they eat, diabetics must choose a flour that can be digested slowly, is high in fibre, low in carbs and calories to maintain blood sugar levels. Considering all this topped with the wide variety of “diabetes-friendly” attas (flours) available in the market today – one might think it is easier never to eat anything made with flour again!
But wait, help is at hand! Because today, we have the full scoop for you on which varieties and types of flours are best suited for people with diabetes.
The perfect recipe for diabetes-friendly flour
According to Dr. Jyoti Sawant, Dietitian at Delhi-based Obino, “The best flour for people with diabetes would be to eat standalone or a good mix of multigrain flour. Mix whole grains, such as finger millets (ragi or nachni), millets (bajra), barley (jau), soya beans, sorghum (jowar), amaranth grains (ramdana/rajgira), and chickpea flour (Bengal gram or kabuli chana) and your perfect diabetes-friendly flour is ready. All of these ingredients have a rich nutritional profile and are high in dietary fibre with complex carbohydrate content.Making multigrain flour an excellent choice for controlling blood sugar spikes and managing weight.”
How to make diabetes-friendly flour at home
Indian brea Continue reading

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