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The Diabetes Drug Metformin Linked To Vitamin B12 Deficiency

The Diabetes Drug Metformin Linked to Vitamin B12 Deficiency

The Diabetes Drug Metformin Linked to Vitamin B12 Deficiency

If you are taking the popular diabetes medication Metformin or know someone who does, please read on. Metformin is a common orally-administered drug used to treat type 2 diabetes.
It goes by other brand and generic names such as:
Glucophage
Riomet
Fortamet
Glumetza
Obimet
Dianben
Diabex
Diaformin
Approved in 1994, the way Metformin works is by increasing the individual’s sensitivity to her/his own insulin, reducing liver glucose production, and decreasing the amount of sugar absorbed by the intestines. (1)
Side Effects of Metformin
One of the problems with Metformin’s actions is that it causes vitamin B12 deficiency.
This side effect has been known since 2006. By way of the same mechanism that blocks sugar absorption by the intestines, this essential vitamin is also blocked. The extent of the deficiency is dose- and time-dependent: the higher the amount you take and the longer you take Metformin, the greater and more critical the deficiency.
Since 2006, there have been many studies into this Metformin/B12 relationship and all have come to the same conclusion. (2, 3)
In fact, a 2016 study conducted by the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in NY monitored the B12 levels of people taking a placebo and metformin twice a day for 5 and 13 years. Plus “Those who used to take metformin had lower levels of vitamin B12 in comparison to those who took the placebo.”(4)
In addition to a B12 deficiency, side effects of Metformin include pernicious anemia with long-term use. (5) The anemia is often preceded by neuropathy.
See also: Reversing diabetes Type-2
The Dangers Vitamin B Continue reading

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Clinical Dietitian Earns Credentials as ‘Certified Diabetes Educator’

Clinical Dietitian Earns Credentials as ‘Certified Diabetes Educator’

Susan K. Ray is Second CAH Nutrition Team Member to Complete Extensive Requirements
Carthage Area Hospital Clinical Dietitian Susan K. “Susie” Ray recently earned credentials as a Certified Diabetes Educator, completing more than a year of training and education that culminated with successful passage of a rigorous credentialing exam.
A Certified Diabetes Educator is a health professional who possesses comprehensive knowledge of and experience in diabetes management, prediabetes, and diabetes prevention. A CDE educates and supports people affected by diabetes to understand and manage the condition while promoting self-management to achieve individualized behavioral and treatment goals that optimize health outcomes.
Ray joins Carthage Area Hospital Nutrition Services Director Carly R. Draper, RD, CDN, CDE, as the second Certified Diabetes Educator on the hospital’s clinical staff.
“We are proud of Susie’s latest professional success; she has worked tremendously hard on this goal,” Draper said. “An additional CDE enables our Nutrition Services team to expand its clinical care and outreach for those who face diabetes or who may be at risk for developing diabetes. The more people on staff who are qualified to help improve the lives of our patients, the better we can make a difference in the outcomes we hope to achieve.”
A grant from the North Country Initiative helped Carthage Area Hospital cover training and related expenses for Ray to complete the requirements of CDE credentialing, which include 1,000 clinical practice hours, academic materials, continuing edu Continue reading

Healthy food and drink choices that can treat, cure type-2 diabetes

Healthy food and drink choices that can treat, cure type-2 diabetes

(NaturalNews) The average diabetic is more than likely used to hearing all about the types of things he or she should not be eating and drinking. But how often are diabetics advised about what they can, and should, be eating and drinking, particularly as these foods pertain to treating and even reversing diabetes?
There are a number of foods and beverages that can actually help cure type-2 diabetes, if only the mainstream medical system understood and was willing to share this critical knowledge with the public. But since this information remains largely obscure, we would like to take the opportunity to share some of it here for your enrichment.
According to Body Ecology, the root cause of type-2 diabetes is a flora imbalance in the gut that is marked by a systemic yeast infection known as candidiasis. And the only way to effectively eliminate this blood-borne infection, of sorts, is to feed your body with the nutrients and probiotics it needs to regain proper balance.
So here are some helpful tips for eating and drinking your way to a life free of type-2 diabetes:
Eat more leafy green vegetables. Since they are both highly alkalizing and cleansing, leafy green vegetables are a great food source that will feed your body the vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients it needs, and help restore a proper pH balance in your system. Both of these functions will help rid your body of toxic yeasts, and create conditions in which blood sugar is properly regulated and balanced.
Kale, collard greens, bok choy, spinach, green cabbage, turnip greens, arugula, Brussels sprouts, Swiss chard Continue reading

Mediterranean diet may help reduce risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Mediterranean diet may help reduce risk of Type 2 Diabetes

An estimated 86 million Americans are at risk for Type 2 Diabetes, but nearly 90 percent of them don’t know it.
Doctors say adhering to a Mediterranean diet may help to reverse your risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes.
The Mediterranean diet, which is especially popular from Spain and Italy to Greece and the Middle East, largely focuses on seasonal fruits and vegetables.
“It’s dark leafy greens, freshly foraged greens in all different varieties… like kale and collards and spinach and chard,” said Dahlia Shaaban, founder of Washington, D.C.-based Live Deliciously.
The majority of foods in a Mediterranean diet do come from plants, but Shaaban says to go for fish or lean proteins twice per week. Salmon and tuna, for example, contain Omega 3 Fatty Acids which promote heart and brain health.
“So you can think of crowding out your plate with more plant-based foods, then enjoying meat here and there,” explained Shaaban.
Beans, nuts and whole grains are everyday staples in a Mediterranean meal plan.
“The grain is something you can hold onto,” said Shaaban. “Brown rice, farro, wide rice, quinoa, bulgur or cracked wheat. The most common beans you find in the Mediterranean are: lentils, chickpeas, fava beans, black eyed peas.”
The American Diabetes Association suggests using olive oil to cook instead of butter or margarine. That can help to lower cholesterol levels. And when it comes to seasoning, herbs, spices and citrus juice are better options than salt.
Finally, limit alcohol and sugar—and you’ve got the perfect blend of health-conscious choices for people Continue reading

Can Chemicals Cause Diabetes?

Can Chemicals Cause Diabetes?

In general, the risk factors for type 2 diabetes are pretty clear: A lack of exercise, a poor diet, genes, and ethnicity are the most serious determinants of the disease. But now that more than 29 million Americans have diabetes and 86 million more are prediabetic, researchers are also focusing on other factors that might increase a person’s risk of developing diabetes.
Some of the other culprits thought to be contributing to the diabetes epidemic are chemicals found in the environment and in products we use daily. Certain chemicals may directly increase the risk of the disease, while others may contribute to obesity, a serious risk factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. At this point, research on whether exposure to chemicals can lead to any or all types of diabetes is still in the very preliminary stages, and there's a lack of randomized controlled studies — the gold standard for medical research — indicating that the two are directly linked. Here’s what we know now.
The Relationship Between Chemicals and Diabetes
“There is an association between some chemicals in the environment and diabetes,” says Kristina Thayer, PhD, director of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) division of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. “What we don’t know is whether it’s causal.” That means that while a number of studies might link a higher level of certain chemicals to a greater likelihood of developing diabetes, it’s not yet clear whether that chemical exposure preceded the diabetes. More research is nee Continue reading

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