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“The Best And Worst Diabetes Food Advice I’ve Seen”

“The Best and Worst Diabetes Food Advice I’ve Seen”

“The Best and Worst Diabetes Food Advice I’ve Seen”

What’s the best and the worst diabetes food advice ever? Here’s Adam Brown’s take, which makes a lot of sense:
I’ll never forget the diabetes food advice I received from my doctor at diagnosis:
“You can eat whatever you want, as long as you take insulin for it.”
In my view, this advice is misleading, overly simplistic, and damaging. In fact, I’d nominate it for the “worst” diabetes food advice out there. Unfortunately, those who are newly diagnosed tell me it is still common. Ugh.
diaTribe: The Best and Worst Diabetes Food Advice I’ve Seen
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Insulin Inhaler: New Diabetes Option Before Meals

Insulin Inhaler: New Diabetes Option Before Meals

There’s good news for patients who would like an easier way to get their insulin. A new rapid inhaled insulin has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
The new drug, called Afrezza®, delivers insulin in the form of a fine powder, and you can inhale it at the start of a meal to help with blood sugar control.
As a nurse and certified diabetes educator who has also lived with diabetes for the past 17 years, I wanted to try this new option. After using it for a few months, I found the inhaled insulin to be effective, easy to use, and a great alternative to an injection when I needed mealtime insulin. It can be used safely with any basal insulin, such as Lantus®, Levemir® or Toujeo®. Anyone who has Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes can benefit from this treatment option.
Inhaler benefits
Here are some of the benefits of the inhaled insulin:
It decreases risk for hypoglycemia. The onset time is 12 to 15 minutes and it is totally out of your system within 180 minutes.
It is painless, convenient and effective. Once inhaled, the insulin gets released into the body through your lungs and released into tiny airways that help move the insulin into the bloodstream quickly.
Color coding makes the dosages easy to identify. The color coding of the blisters are blue for four units, green for eight units and yellow for 12 units of insulin. This color coding decreases the possibility of errors.
The blister and the inhaling device are small and compact. Both can easily fit into a small purse or pant pocket.
The inhaling device is included with the monthly prescription. The dev Continue reading

The 6 Best (and Worst) Diets If You Have Diabetes

The 6 Best (and Worst) Diets If You Have Diabetes

Are you looking for a way to reset your diet to lose weight? Losing weight has many benefits, especially for people with diabetes. It not only can improve blood sugar levels but it can lower your high blood pressure and heart disease risk.
But it’s important not to go for a quick fix. For lasting success, focus on good nutrition and changes you can commit to long term. Yes, but how do you do that? There are many diets out there claiming health benefits. Here, we’ll talk through some common diets out there and offer our advice for people with diabetes.
Besides sticking to a particular diet, here’s some tried-and true tips:
Watch portion sizes (particularly for carbohydrates). This can help cut down on calories and improve blood sugar.
Divide food choices for a healthy plate. Go for half vegetables, one-quarter protein and one-quarter carbohydrates.
There many diets out there that you can look to for weight loss, but our list highlights the three best and three worst diet choices for people with diabetes.
Best diets
Champion diets offer well-rounded nutrition
1. DASH. Created to help lower blood pressure (aptly named Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), the DASH diet goes well beyond that. It is a well-rounded, healthy nutrition plan for everyone. DASH is rich in fruits, vegetables and grains, and low in fat, sugar and sodium.
For example, on a 2,000-calorie DASH plan, each day you would eat:
Six to eight servings of whole grains
Four to five vegetables
Four to five fruits
Two or three servings of dairy
Six or fewer servings of meats (in this case, a serving is one Continue reading

“Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Starts with Ignoring the Guidelines”

“Reversing Type 2 Diabetes Starts with Ignoring the Guidelines”

Here’s a great new TEDx-talk on how to reverse type 2 diabetes using LCHF diets. It was released a couple of days ago.
The presenter is Dr. Sarah Hallberg, the medical director and founder of the Indiana University – Arnett Health Medical Weight Loss Program. I didn’t know about her before, but suspect this is not the last we hear from her.
This talk starts out good, but it turns great as it goes on. Anybody with type 2 diabetes – or who treats type 2 diabetes – would benefit from seeing it.
The presentation been viewed over 12,000 times in just a few days. Hopefully it will be seen by ten times as many soon, end up on the main TED site – and be seen by millions.
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Can You Eat Eggs if You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Eggs if You Have Diabetes?

To eat or not to eat?
Eggs are a versatile food and a great source of protein.
The American Diabetes Association considers eggs an excellent choice for people with diabetes. That’s primarily because one large egg contains about half a gram of carbohydrates, so it’s thought that they aren’t going to raise your blood sugar.
Eggs are high in cholesterol, though. One large egg contains nearly 200 mg of cholesterol, but whether or not this negatively affects the body is debatable.
Monitoring your cholesterol is important if you have diabetes because diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream also raise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. But dietary intake of cholesterol doesn’t have as profound an effect on blood levels as was once thought. So, it’s important for anyone with diabetes to be aware of and minimize other heart disease risks.
A whole egg contains about 7 grams of protein. Eggs are also an excellent source of potassium, which supports nerve and muscle health. Potassium helps balance sodium levels in the body as well, which improves your cardiovascular health.
Eggs have many nutrients, such as lutein and choline. Lutein protects you against disease and choline is thought to improve brain health. Egg yolks contain biotin, which is important for healthy hair, skin, and nails, as well as insulin production. Eggs from chickens that roam on pastures are high in omega-3s, which are beneficial fats for people with diabetes.
Eggs are easy on the waistline, too. One large egg has only about 75 calori Continue reading

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