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The 10 Best Diabetes Blogs

The 10 best diabetes blogs

The 10 best diabetes blogs

Living with diabetes can be a challenging burden. But it can be helpful to share your frustrations and successes, and read about people's similar experiences. We have identified the best diabetes blogs that aim to inspire, empower, and educate readers.
Diabetes is a group of diseases that impact how the body uses blood glucose, and it affects around 29.1 million people in the United States.
Having type 1 diabetes means that the body does not produce enough insulin, and the condition is more commonly diagnosed in childhood or adolescence.
But having type 2 diabetes means that the body cannot use insulin properly, and this type is more common in individuals over the age of 40 years. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95 percent of all diagnosed diabetes cases.
Keeping on top of your diabetes treatment plan can be a round-the-clock commitment that may feature blood sugar monitoring, medications and insulin, healthy eating, and regular physical activity.
Medical News Today have rounded up the top 10 diabetes blogs, based on the quality of their information, helpful tips, recipes, fitness advice, and personal accounts.
Speaking of Diabetes
Speaking of Diabetes is the blog of the Joslin Diabetes Center. The Joslin Diabetes Center is a research and teaching affiliate of the Harvard Medical School. Their team of more than 300 scientists is dedicated to finding innovative pathways to prevent, treat, and cure type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
While in pursuit of a world without diabetes, Joslin is helping to improve the lives of individuals with diabetes through patient education programs and ca Continue reading

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3 Ways Having Type 1 Diabetes Makes Me a Better Parent

3 Ways Having Type 1 Diabetes Makes Me a Better Parent

There was absolutely a time in my life when I firmly believed I shouldn’t get pregnant and give birth to my own children because of reasons like, “This body isn’t a good environment for a baby to grow inside of” or “My body is under enough stress, why would I put it through pregnancy?”
And what about after the baby was born? Surely that baby would interfere with my own self-care of the chronic illnesses I’ve been diagnosed with.
And for some, those may be very valid reasons not to become pregnant, but for me, I’m actually pretty darn healthy despite having type 1 diabetes, celiac disease and fibromyalgia. On paper, when you don’t look at those diagnoses, I’m a healthy gal at a healthy weight, healthy blood pressure, yada yada yada. No doctor had ever told me I couldn’t pursue pregnancy. If anything, the opposite was encouraged.
About two years after falling in love with my husband, it suddenly dawned on me: I can absolutely handle pregnancy and giving birth to my own children. I can do this. And I want this.
I was suddenly done letting fear stand in the way of something I genuinely wanted: creating a family with my husband.
Here are three reasons I am so grateful I didn’t let fear prevent me from pursuing pregnancy and motherhood:
1. It gave me a new appreciation for what my body can do.
My body can’t produce insulin. My body can’t digest gluten properly. My body severely overreacts with symptoms of intense pain and extreme exhaustion for reasons medical researchers still don’t understand when I use my muscles and joints for anything beyond the Continue reading

After 20 Years of Watching Diabetes Tech, Kliff Eyes Smart Insulin Pens, CGM for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

After 20 Years of Watching Diabetes Tech, Kliff Eyes Smart Insulin Pens, CGM for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

An experienced market watcher who has diabetes predicts the key to success will come down to one factor: ease of use.
Although current medications can maintain healthy blood sugar levels in most patients who have type 1 (T1D) or type 2 diabetes (T2D), most patients don’t use them correctly and therefore suffer the expensive and unpleasant complications of both hyper- and hypoglycemia. Less than half of all patients with T2D achieve glycemic goals advocated by the American Diabetes Association, and about two-thirds die prematurely of heart disease.1
Study results indicate that educational interventions can boost treatment adherence, at least among some patients,2 but many experts believe the only hope for widespread improvement among real-world patients lies in new medications and novel technologies—products that dramatically reduce the pain and complexity of proper self-care.
David Kliff, who has run Diabetes Investor since he was diagnosed with the condition more than 20 years ago, is a leading spokesman for this view. His livelihood depends upon being able to predict how patients will behave (and, therefore, what they will buy), and he scoffs at the notion that any affordable intervention produces significantly better outcomes with traditional treatment tools. He believes that better tools can produce better outcomes, that several significantly better tools have recently hit the market, and that more are coming soon.
Kliff is not alone in his general optimism, but his specific predications differ from those of many others who think technology is about to revolutionize Continue reading

6 Things to Consider When Working With Clients With Type 2 Diabetes

6 Things to Consider When Working With Clients With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a growing problem in the United States. An estimated 29 million Americans (9.3% of the population) currently have diabetes, and by 2050, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predict that number will rise to as many as one in three adults. As a health and fitness professional, you likely work with clients who have type 2 diabetes. To kick off Diabetes Awareness Month, here are six important factors to consider when working with clients with type 2 diabetes.
1. Obtain Medical Clearance
According to the American College of Sports Medicine’s Risk Stratification Criteria, clients with a known metabolic disease should receive a medical exam prior to engaging in physical activity. This step is often overlooked among those with type 2 diabetes because it has become so common. While exercise will benefit individuals with type 2 diabetes, certain medical precautions may be required. Obtaining medical clearance before exercise ensures that both you and your client stay safe.
2. Monitor Blood Sugar
At the onset of exercise, the body breaks down stored glycogen for energy, and muscle cells become more receptive to glucose. In individuals with diabetes, the ability to uptake glucose is compromised, which can lead to more extreme blood-sugar responses to exercise. With very high-intensity exercise, the liver may break down glycogen more rapidly than the muscle cells can uptake it, causing an initial increase in blood glucose levels. In other cases, blood glucose levels may fall too rapidly, putting individuals at risk for low blood sugar or hypoglycemia.
Monitoring Continue reading

Artificial pancreas for type 1 diabetes could reach patients by 2018

Artificial pancreas for type 1 diabetes could reach patients by 2018

A new report brings welcome news to patients with type 1 diabetes: an artificial pancreas that continuously monitors blood glucose levels and delivers insulin to the body as and when needed could be available in the next 2 years.
Type 1 diabetes is estimated to affect around 1.25 million children and adults in the United States.
The condition arises when the beta cells of the pancreas stop producing insulin - the hormone that is responsible for removing glucose from the blood and transporting it to cells, where it is used for energy. Without insulin, blood glucose levels become too high.
In order to control blood glucose levels, patients with type 1 diabetes require daily doses of insulin, either through injections or an insulin pump.
Injections remain the most common form of insulin administration; two daily injections are normally recommended for patients who have just been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, normally increasing to three or four over time.
Insulin pumps are a more advanced form of insulin delivery. They are devices that deliver a continuous dose of insulin 24 hours a day via a catheter that is inserted under the skin.
The problems with current insulin therapies
However, while mostly effective for blood glucose control in type 1 diabetes, current insulin delivery methods do not account for variability of insulin needs among patients with type 1 diabetes.
The amount of insulin a patient needs can vary from day to day, depending on their diet, physical activity levels, and - for women - changes in insulin sensitivity during menstruation.
According to report auth Continue reading

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