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Symptoms At Diagnosis May Predict Progression Of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms at Diagnosis May Predict Progression of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms at Diagnosis May Predict Progression of Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers followed patients who were newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for 18 months to classify their disease progression based on 20 baseline symptoms.
With Caroline A. Brorsson, PhD, and Michael Gonzalez-Campoy, MD, PhD
Three major subgroups of newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) experienced different rates of disease progression over 18 months,1 according to data presented at the 53rd annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Lisbon, Portugal. The research was part of the Diabetes Research on Patient Stratification project (DIRECT) within the European Union Framework 7 Innovative Medicines Initiative.
Patients with type 2 diabetes are likely to present with varying degrees of insulin resistance and beta cell failure.1 Understanding the heterogeneity of a T2D presentation may lead to more effective treatment strategies for these patients. An underlying difference in pathophysiology may be indicative of a patient’s responsiveness to a prescribed treatment and have an anticipated effect on disease progression.1
Evaluating Differences in Diabetes Progression
Caroline Brorsson, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher at the Technical University of Denmark and colleagues used the detailed clinical phenotyping from the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DIRECT) to identify and cluster subgroups of patients who were newly diagnosed with T2D.1,2 In the DIRECT study, detailed metabolic data were collected on patients newly diagnosed with either prediabetes or type 2 diabetes.2
“Using a very detailed clinical phenotyping methodology, w Continue reading

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Berberine: A Supplement for Diabetes as Good as a Drug?

Berberine: A Supplement for Diabetes as Good as a Drug?


Berberine: A Supplement for Diabetes as Good as a Drug?
Berberine: A Supplement for Diabetes as Good as a Drug?
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has declared diabetes an American epidemic with more than 25 million Americans afflicted with diabetes. Another 80 million are classified prediabetic, per the American Diabetes Association. The numbers get even bigger when you put a dollar sign in front of them: As of 2012, $245 billion a year was being spent on diabetes in the U.S., including $176 billion in direct medical costs and the rest -- $69 billion in lost productivity.
Its no wonder that pharmaceutical companies remain fully engaged in diabetes-related research, devising new medications and enhancing the older ones looking for a cure. Among the drugs now being used for type 2 diabetes are metformin, sulfonylureas (which goes by the trade names Diabeta and Glucotrol, among others) and DPP-5 inhibitors (Januvia, Tradienta, etc.). All have been shown to be effective to one degree or another, but the epidemic continues to beg for new and improved drugs.
One of the great new hopes in the world of diabetes treatment is a natural plant-based compound that has been used for thousands of years in traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medical practice. However, it has only become a part of Western medicine in recent years. Most of the attention on berberine, at least in the U.S., encompasses only the 21st century. In that sense, our newest discovery means we are just now catching up with the rest of the world.
Note to readers: Wonder Labs will have a special Continue reading

Long-Term Benefits of Linoleic Acid In Type 2 Diabetes

Long-Term Benefits of Linoleic Acid In Type 2 Diabetes


Home / Conditions / Type 2 Diabetes / Long-Term Benefits of Linoleic Acid In Type 2 Diabetes
Long-Term Benefits of Linoleic Acid In Type 2 Diabetes
High linoleic acid level could reduce type 2 risk by 43 percent, new study found.
Polyunsaturated fatty acids such as omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are beneficial for improving lipid profiles in healthy individuals and among patients with type 2 diabetes.
Supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids lowers triglycerides and VLDL cholesterol, but they might also increase LDL cholesterol. Latest evidences suggest omega-3 fatty acids are not related to mortality, hypertension, cardiovascular disease as well as the risk of microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. Meanwhile, the metabolic effects of omega-6 fatty acids remain largely unknown and there is little available evidence regarding their potential role in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. A pooled analysis of international studies was assessed to find the associations of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid biomarkers with incident type 2 diabetes.
Researchers analyzed data from 20 prospective cohort studies from ten countries, including Iceland, Netherlands, United States, Taiwan, United Kingdom, Germany, Finland, Australia, Sweden, and France. All included study participants were between 49-76 years old with a body mass index of 23.328.4 kg/m2 and had data for linoleic acid and arachidonic acid biomarkers at baseline. Any participants with type 2 diabetes at baseline were excluded from the study. Researchers defined incident type 2 diabetes as havin Continue reading

Diabetes and Alcohol: to drink or not to drink

Diabetes and Alcohol: to drink or not to drink


Diabetes and Alcohol: to drink or not to drink
The life of a diabetic is full of challenges and they have to face it in each and every day of their lives. Each day seems like a struggle and this tussle takes a heavy toll on diabetic physically and emotionally.
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One of the major concern among diabetic is what kind of items they can have and what needs to be avoided. And with this problem, a question arises of diabetes and alcohol relationship;
Are they prone to more risk of complication with alcohol?
What is the safe limit for a diabetic to have alcohol?
A large chunk of population consume alcohol in some form or another;
Consumption of alcohol is only rising due to stressful life and increased depression related cases;
Our films have also promoted alcohol intake, they have developed a sense of perception that late night partying and boozing around is a way for happy and successful life;
Reports claiming health benefits of alcohol have confused people whether it is good or bad for health;
Before coming to a straight answer, we should understand how our body reacts with alcohol intake.
The food we eat get metabolize and digested in thestomach.
But the case is different with alcohol; our liver is responsible for Alcohol metabolism.
1. It stores and secretes glucose to cells in order to fuel them when we are not eating
So whenever we take alcohol, it is not considered as food by our stomach but identified as toxic Continue reading

Device Connectivity  The Next Big Wave in Diabetes

Device Connectivity The Next Big Wave in Diabetes


Device Connectivity The Next Big Wave in Diabetes
The Apple Watch and its operating system iOS 8 holds great promise for people with diabetes when it and the iPhone finally connect wearers to Apples Health software. With Android options also rapidly developing, these advances hold great potential for easy passage of diabetes data between devices so it can benefit people with diabetes and their health care providers. The question we really want answered is when will the meter, pump and CGM talk to each other?
The Apple Watch and its operating system iOS 8 holds great promise for people with diabetes when it and the iPhone finally connect wearers to Apples Health software. With Android options also rapidly developing, these advances hold great potential for easy passage of diabetes data between devices so it can benefit people with diabetes and their health care providers. The question we really want answered is when will the meter, pump and CGM talk to each other?
Connectivity is the coming big wave in diabetes, offering better tools to solve the ongoing problems of high A1cs, variable blood sugars, and hypoglycemia. Advances in health care are now being brought about not only by clinicians or pharmaceutical companies but by telecommunication and software developers. Connectivity will make glucose control more accessible, more affordable, and bring greater clarity to day-to-day interventions.
Tracking a wealth of data such as glucose readings, glucose trend lines, calorie and carb intake, activity levels, weight, and blood pressure is critical in diabetes care, yet co Continue reading

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