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Swapping For Fructose: Effects Of A Sugar Replacement On Diabetes

Swapping for Fructose: Effects of a Sugar Replacement on Diabetes

Swapping for Fructose: Effects of a Sugar Replacement on Diabetes


Researchers determine the effects of replacing glucose or sucrose with fructose on glucose, insulin, and triglyceride concentrations.
When you think about eating healthier, what do you think about limiting in your diet? Sugar? Carbohydrates? Both?
Over the years, sugar has gained a bad reputation. The bad sugar that usually comes to mind is sucrose, commonly known as table sugar. However, there are two other types of sugars: glucose and fructose. Glucose and fructose are referred to as simple sugars because they are made up of single sugar molecules. Joined together, glucose and fructose form sucrose.
Our bodies break down sucrose into the simple sugars glucose and fructose.
Glucose, our bodys preferred energy source, is often referred to as blood sugar because it circulates in our blood. When we eat, our body breaks down sugar and carbohydrates into glucose for energy. Our bodies can either use glucose immediately, or store it muscle or liver cells in the form of glycogen for later use.
Fructose is a sugar naturally found in fruits and vegetables. It differs from the other sugars because our bodies process it differently. Fructose is not our bodys preferred energy source and unlike glucose, it does not cause insulin to be released.
Our bodies need the hormone insulin so that glucose can be taken up into our cells for energy.
Individuals with diabetes either dont make enough insulin, or their bodies do not respond properly to the insulin that is produced. In some cases, it is a combination of both. In type 1 diabetes, which usually begins in childhood, the body att Continue reading

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Camp PowerUp Takes Active, Mindful Approach to Diabetes Prevention

Camp PowerUp Takes Active, Mindful Approach to Diabetes Prevention


Camp PowerUp Takes Active, Mindful Approach to Diabetes Prevention
Campers at the American Diabetes Association's Camp PowerUp practice yoga as part of learning how to prevent Type 2 diabetes.
Sitting on the bleachers at the Westside Family YMCA , children slather on sunscreen and bug spray as they prepare to warm up before breaking into teams to play soccer.
Their excitement increases when camp counselors announce that the winning teams will receive their own soccer balls to take home. Counselors remind the campers to have fun and remember why theyre at camp.
Why are we all here? the counselor asks. The children respond in unison: Diabetes!
The boys and girls, ages 10-14, were all sizes and ethnicities, representative of San Antonios diverse population. What they all have in common: They are at high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. Their participation in Camp PowerUp , a weeklong day camp sponsoredby the American Diabetes Association , was designed to short-circuit that risk by educating the children and their families about diabetes, nutrition, obesity prevention, and the importance of physical activity. During the week, the 50 campers played games, sampled healthy foods, and learned about good nutrition through interactive activities.
The Westside Family YMCA hosts the American Diabetes Associations Camp PowerUp.
Diabetesis the sixth-leading cause of death in Texas and the fourth-leading cause of death in Bexar County. Type 2 diabetes is largely preventable, yet it accounts for nearly 95% of all diabetes diagnoses in the United States.
The Westside of San A Continue reading

Early Glycemic Control and Magnitude of HbA1c Reduction Predict Cardiovascular Events and Mortality: Population-Based Cohort Study of 24,752 Metformin Initiators

Early Glycemic Control and Magnitude of HbA1c Reduction Predict Cardiovascular Events and Mortality: Population-Based Cohort Study of 24,752 Metformin Initiators

OBJECTIVE We investigated the association of early achieved HbA1c level and magnitude of HbA1c reduction with subsequent risk of cardiovascular events or death in patients with type 2 diabetes who initiate metformin.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a population-based cohort study including all metformin initiators with HbA1c tests in Northern Denmark, 2000–2012. Six months after metformin initiation, we classified patients by HbA1c achieved (<6.5% or higher) and by magnitude of HbA1c change from the pretreatment baseline. We used Cox regression to examine subsequent rates of acute myocardial infarction, stroke, or death, controlling for baseline HbA1c and other confounding factors.
RESULTS We included 24,752 metformin initiators (median age 62.5 years, 55% males) with a median follow-up of 2.6 years. The risk of a combined outcome event gradually increased with rising levels of HbA1c achieved compared with a target HbA1c of <6.5%: adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.18 (95% CI 1.07–1.30) for 6.5–6.99%, HR 1.23 (1.09–1.40) for 7.0–7.49%, HR 1.34 (1.14–1.57) for 7.5–7.99%, and HR 1.59 (1.37–1.84) for ≥8%. Results were consistent for individual outcome events and robust by age-group and other patient characteristics. A large absolute HbA1c reduction from baseline also predicted outcome: adjusted HR 0.80 (0.65–0.97) for Δ = −4, HR 0.98 (0.80–1.20) for Δ = −3, HR 0.92 (0.78–1.08) for Δ = −2, and HR 0.99 (0.89–1.10) for Δ = −1 compared with no HbA1c change (Δ = 0).
CONCLUSIONS A large initial HbA1c reduction and achievement of low HbA1c levels Continue reading

Avocado and Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, and More

Avocado and Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, and More


Avocados are growing in popularity. The creamy green fruit is packed with vitamins, nutrients, and heart-healthy fats . While they are high in fat, its the good kind of fat that benefits people with type 2 diabetes .
If you have type 2 diabetes, adding avocado to your diet may help you lose weight, lower cholesterol, and increase insulin sensitivity. Read on to learn more about the benefits of avocados for people with diabetes.
Benefits of avocadofor people with type 2 diabetes
Avocados are low in carbohydrates, which means they have little effect on blood sugar levels. A recent study published in Nutrition Journal evaluated the effects of adding half an avocado to the standard lunch of healthy, overweight people. They discovered that avocados do not significantly impact blood sugar levels.
Part of what makes avocados a good choice for people with diabetes is that, although they are low in carbs, they are high in fiber. Many other high-fiber foods may still spike blood sugar levels.
One half of a small avocado, which is the standard amount people eat, contains about 5.9 grams of carbohydrate and 4.6 grams of fiber.
According to the National Academies , the minimum recommended daily fiber intake for adults is:
A 2012 review published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine looked at the results of 15 studies involving fiber supplements (around 40 grams of fiber) for people with type 2 diabetes. They found that fiber supplements for type 2 diabetes can reduce fasting blood sugar levels and A1c levels .
You dont need to take supplements to achieve the Continue reading

How to Have a Diabetes-Friendly Thanksgiving Day for the Whole Family

How to Have a Diabetes-Friendly Thanksgiving Day for the Whole Family


How to Have a Diabetes-Friendly Thanksgiving Day for the Whole Family
For most Americans, November is the time for turkey, football, and pumpkin spice everything. But its also National Diabetes Month , a time to spread awareness about the disease, which, in 2015, affected over 30 million people in the U.S.
While there are a few different kinds of diabetes , all involve a problem with the bodys ability to produce or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps the bodys cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. When theres not enoughor anyinsulin available, glucose stays in the blood and can cause serious health problems. No matter the form diabetes takes, experts agree that food and lifestyle factors are essential for helping to maintain overall health.
Its important to find a lifestyle that can help improve the lipid [cholesterol] profile, blood pressure, and blood sugar, says Malcolm Thaler, MD, a New York-based physician . All of these goals can help be managed by a lifestyle that incorporates weight loss, healthy nutrition, and exercise.
If youre thinking, Wait a minute! Those sound like great goals for almost anyone, then youre right. Theres no such thing as a diabetic diet, says Tracy Morris, an accredited dietetic professional and nutrition curriculum designer at Fitbit. But luckily, a diabetes-friendly meal is one thats good for everyone!
And a diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving is possible, even if the thought of subjecting traditional relatives to nutritious dishes and light exercise seems daunting. Here are four simple ways to make th Continue reading

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