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Surprising Habits To Give Up With Type 2

Surprising Habits to Give Up With Type 2

Surprising Habits to Give Up With Type 2

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away
have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA
Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems
Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL
Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you redu Continue reading

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Could vitamin A deficiency be a cause of type 2 diabetes?

Could vitamin A deficiency be a cause of type 2 diabetes?

A new study published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry claims to have identified a potential driver of type 2 diabetes: vitamin A deficiency. The researchers, from the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, NY, say their findings may lead to new treatments for the condition.
Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes in the US, accounting for 90-95% of all diagnosed cases.
The condition is characterized by insulin resistance, in which insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are unable to function effectively.
According to senior author Dr. Lorraine Gudas - chairman of the Department of Pharmacology at Weill Cornell - and colleagues, vitamin A boosts beta cell activity, meaning lack of the vitamin may play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes.
There are two types of vitamin A. Preformed vitamin A, referred to as retinol, is present in meat, poultry, fish and dairy products, while pro-vitamin A, or beta-carotene, is found in many fruits and vegetables. Vitamin A aids cell growth and contributes to a healthy immune system and vision.
Past studies have shown that, during fetal development, vitamin A is key for beta cell production. But Dr. Gudas and colleagues say it was unclear as to whether vitamin A played such a role in adulthood.
Removal of dietary vitamin A led to beta cell loss in adult mice
To find out, the team analyzed the beta cell development among two groups of adult mice; one group of mice had been genetically modified to be unable to store dietary vitamin A, while the other group was able to store the vitamin from foods as normal.
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Exercise and type 1 diabetes: World-first guidelines consensus

Exercise and type 1 diabetes: World-first guidelines consensus

A report by leading type 1 diabetes experts (T1D) from around the world has for the first time, provided consensus on managing blood glucose levels safely while exercising.
The report, ‘Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement’ was published in the Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal and involved a team of 21 researchers, including JDRF Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Research Network (T1DCRN) researchers Professor Tim Jones, Professor Paul Fournier and Dr Carmel Smart. The team undertook a review of current published studies to understand the activity levels of those living with T1D and how different types of exercise affect blood glucose levels.
The study found that a large number of people living with T1D worldwide do not have a healthy body weight or achieve the minimum recommended exercise of 150 minutes per week. Many people find managing their condition while exercising to be difficult, and they might avoid daily physical activity because of this. Delayed low blood glucose levels after exercise is a common fear, as well as loss of control and lack of knowledge.
Healthcare professionals should encourage and support regular exercise for many reasons, but primarily because the overall health benefits outweigh the immediate risks if certain precautions are taken.
Research has shown that children and young people with T1D who exercise regularly have reduced cardiovascular disease risk, reduced HbA1c (a marker of long term glucose control) and improved body composition, blood vessel function and cholesterol levels. Adults with T1D benefit from reduc Continue reading

Type 2 diabetes: New biopolymer injection may offer weeks of glucose control

Type 2 diabetes: New biopolymer injection may offer weeks of glucose control

Keeping blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible is important for people with type 2 diabetes, as it lowers the risk of serious complications. However, despite a long list of treatment options, patients still struggle with glucose control, especially when working out meal-specific doses. Treatments that cut down on injections are seen as a way to overcome this problem. Now, in a paper in Nature Biomedical Engineering, scientists describe a new biopolymer injection that could potentially replace daily or weekly insulin shots with one that need only be given once or twice per month.
Untreated diabetes results in high levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which in the long-term can lead to blindness, kidney disease, heart disease, stroke, and amputation of lower limbs.
Diabetes arises because of a problem with insulin, which is a hormone that is made in the pancreas and which helps cells to absorb glucose so that they can use it for energy.
In type 1 diabetes, the body does not make enough insulin, while in type 2 diabetes - which accounts for 90 to 95 percent of diabetes cases - it cannot use it properly.
Although the incidence of newly diagnosed diabetes is starting to drop in the United States, it is still a huge public health problem that affects more than 29 million people.
In 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggested that diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., and that more than a fifth of the country's healthcare costs are for people diagnosed with diabetes.
In their study paper, biomedical engineers from Duke Uni Continue reading

Seven yoga poses for diabetes

Seven yoga poses for diabetes

People with diabetes need to carefully manage their blood sugar levels as they may become too high. This happens because the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the body can't use insulin efficiently.
Without insulin, the sugar in the blood does not reach the body's cells, and it builds up in the blood. Over time, having too much glucose in the blood leads to health problems.
There is currently no cure for either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. However, type 2 diabetes can be managed to a large degree by a healthful diet and regular exercise.
This article explores the role of exercise in diabetes management and addresses whether yoga is beneficial for people with diabetes.
Contents of this article:
How diet and exercise can control diabetes
Eating a healthful diet and being physically active can help control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Keeping blood sugar under control is the best way to avoid complications of diabetes.
A healthful food and exercise plan can help a person:
These are all important factors to help people with diabetes manage their condition and prevent more serious condition, such as heart disease.
A Consensus Statement from the American Diabetes Association strongly links regular physical activity to better outcomes in people with diabetes, including a lower mortality rate.
It is a good idea to get a doctor to approve a diet and exercise program before beginning. In part, this is because exercising too much or too quickly can lead to low blood sugar. This happens because exercise lowers blood glucose levels.
In addition, people with diabet Continue reading

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