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Study: New Oral Drug Helps Control Glucose, Reduces Need For Insulin In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Study: New oral drug helps control glucose, reduces need for insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes

Study: New oral drug helps control glucose, reduces need for insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes


Study: New oral drug helps control glucose, reduces need for insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes
A University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus study finds sotagliflozin helps control glucose and reduces the need for insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes .
Principal results were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine of a global Phase 3 clinical trial in patients with type 1 diabetes treated with sotagliflozin. Sotagliflozin is an investigational new oral drug for patients with type 1 diabetes that has shown promise in improving glucose control without any increase in severe hypoglycemia or diabetic ketoacidosis compared to insulin alone.
Among 1,402 trial participants given the drug, sotagliflozin showed clinically meaningful and statistically significant effects on glucose control. Concentrations of hemoglobin A1C, a measure of plasma glucose, were improved. Patients experienced a lower rate of confirmed severe hypoglycemia than observed in patients on placebo and also had weight loss.
According to lead investigator Satish Garg, MD, professor of medicine and pediatrics at the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, no oral medication has ever been approved for the treatment of type 1 diabetes and sotagliflozin has the potential to become the first new treatment innovation in nearly a century since insulin.
Most patients do not achieve optimal glycemic control with insulin alone. A1C concentrations, hypertension and reduction in body weight are critical issues which significantly impact peopl Continue reading

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Preventing Prediabetes from Becoming Diabetes by 80%

Preventing Prediabetes from Becoming Diabetes by 80%


Home / Conditions / Obesity / Preventing Prediabetes from Becoming Diabetes by 80%
Preventing Prediabetes from Becoming Diabetes by 80%
In a new international clinical trial, it was shown that the drug liraglutide 3.0 mg may reduce diabetes risk by 80% in individuals with obesity and prediabetes.
Prediabetes, also commonly referred to as borderline diabetes, is a metabolic condition and growing global problem that is closely tied to obesity. If undiagnosed or untreated, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes; which, whilst treatable, is currently not fully reversible.
At this point in time (March 1, 2017), the FDA has not approved any drugs to treat prediabetes, except to improve nutrition and increase physical activity, even though a number of drugs have been shown in studies to reduce the risk of prediabetes becoming diabetes.
The study ran between June 1, 2011, and March 2, 2015. They randomly assigned 2,254 patients to receive liraglutide (n=1505) or placebo (n=749). 1,128 (50%) participants completed the study up to week 160, after withdrawal of 714 (47%) participants in the liraglutide group and 412 (55%) participants in the placebo group. By week 160, 26 (2%) of the 1,472 individuals in the liraglutide group versus 46 (6%) of 738 in the placebo group were diagnosed with diabetes while on treatment. The mean time from randomization to diagnosis was 99 (SD 47) weeks for the 26 individuals in the liraglutide group versus 87 (47) weeks for the 46 individuals in the placebo group. Taking the different diagnosis frequencies between the treatment groups into ac Continue reading

Clemson receives $2.66M for diabetes prevention, nurse practitioner diversity efforts

Clemson receives $2.66M for diabetes prevention, nurse practitioner diversity efforts

GREENVILLE — The Greenville Health Authority board (GHA) has awarded Clemson University a total of $2.66 million for diabetes prevention efforts and scholarships to increase diversity in the nurse practitioner workforce.
Clemson University’s public health sciences department and Clemson Cooperative Extension received a grant for $2.25 million to fund a diabetes prevention and management initiative, while Clemson’s School of Nursing received a grant for $410,000 to provide scholarships for nurse practitioner students.
The Greenville Health Authority board, previously known as the Greenville Health System (GHS) board of trustees, is providing the funding as part of a 20-year pledge to make Greenville County the healthiest in America by 2036. All grant recipients will be honored at a reception at 3 p.m. Thursday in the Greenville Memorial Hospital Community Room located at 701 Grove Road in Greenville.
Diabetes prevention and control
The Integrated Services for Diabetes Prevention and Management initiative is co-led by Clemson’s department of public health sciences, Clemson Cooperative Extension and GHS.
This five-year initiative connects Clemson with diabetes prevention and management efforts at Greenville Health System as well as initiatives of the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, the South Carolina Lieutenant Governor’s Office on Aging and the American Diabetes Association.
A key component of the initiative is research collaboration between Clemson public health sciences and Cooperative Extension. The program provides a unique opportu Continue reading

Waterdown families shine a light on Type 1 diabetes

Waterdown families shine a light on Type 1 diabetes


Waterdown families shine a light on Type 1 diabetes
Several Waterdown families used the month of Novembers designation at World Diabetes Month to raise awareness about Type 1 diabetes and the demands it places on families who have been diagnosed with the disease.
At Guardian Angels Catholic Elementary School students wore blue Nov. 17 to mark World Diabetes Day, including eight-year-old Keely Milford, who lives with Type 1 diabetes.
It was really amazing for her to be able to have that opportunity to share and educate, said her mom Audrey.
For Karen Des Roches, whose four-year-old daughter Isobel was diagnosed two years ago, the month and World Diabetes Day on Nov. 14 offered an opportunity to shine a light on the disease.
Isobel, an Allan A. Greenleaf Elementary School junior kindergarten student, sent out invitations to her class to wear blue on the day and raise awareness about the disease.
According to JDRF formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Type 1 diabetes can strike adults or children at any age. The autoimmune disease causes a persons pancreas to stop producing insulin a hormone that allows people to get energy from food. The disease occurs when the bodys immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells. Type 1 diabetes is unrelated to diet and lifestyle and causes a person to be dependent on pumped or injected insulin for the remainder of their life.
More than 300,000 Canadians live with the disease and JDRF said Type 1 diabetes may shorten a persons lifespan by as much as 15 years.
While insulin injections and infusions al Continue reading

Communication, careful planning ensure students with diabetes can succeed at school

Communication, careful planning ensure students with diabetes can succeed at school


Communication, careful planning ensure students with diabetes can succeed at school
Type 1 diabetes remains one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. According to the ongoing SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study, about 200,000 U.S. children and adolescents have type 1 diabetes. By 2050, that number is expected to rise to 600,000, according to JDRF.
The numbers mean more students with the disease will be attending more schools, where proper management is critical but confusion about the law and what children are entitled to has led to situations that sometimes result in discrimination or put children with diabetes at risk, experts told Endocrine Today. When a child and his or her family are coping with a new type 1 diagnosis, members of the care team ranging from pediatric endocrinologists to certified diabetes educators and primary care providers often find themselves preparing families for battles on several fronts.
In the school setting, to manage type 1 diabetes well and prevent acute and long-term complications, planning, training and ongoing communication are required, Anastasia Albanese- ONeill, PhD, ARNP, CDE, assistant clinical professor in the division of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Florida, told Endocrine Today. Youre monitoring glucose levels, taking insulin as prescribed, counting carbohydrates, learning to recognize low blood glucose. There are a lot of elements. The broader challenge is that, often if a kid is diagnosed in the middle of the school year, its an abrupt change in that childs life. They may be the only child in thei Continue reading

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