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Study Links Vaccine Induced Immune Overload To Autism, Diabetes, Obesity

Study Links Vaccine Induced Immune Overload to Autism, Diabetes, Obesity

Study Links Vaccine Induced Immune Overload to Autism, Diabetes, Obesity

A new vaccine study published in Molecular and Genetic Medicine is bringing to the forefront the disturbing connection between the dramatic expansion in the quantity of routine childhood vaccines administered and a corresponding increase in inflammation-associated disorders.
Titled, "Review of Vaccine Induced Immune Overload and the Resulting Epidemics of Type 1 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome, Emphasis on Explaining the Recent Accelerations in the Risk of Prediabetes and other Immune Mediated Diseases," the study argues that vaccine-induced immune overload is a driving factor in a number of rapidly accelerating childhood epidemics including:
Autism
Type 1 diabetes
Asthma
Food allergies
Many autoimmune diseases
Obesity
Type 2 diabetes
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFL)
Metabolic disease.
The paper sought to provide a theory of vaccine induced immune overload to explain many observations about the changes in the epidemics. The fundamental problem, according to the study, is that vaccinology assumes a 'one size fits all' approach that results in the majority of the vaccine recipients having overstimulated immune systems:
"One major problem with vaccines is the concept of one size fits all. Package inserts of almost all vaccines recommend a dose based on age. In order for a vaccine to be a commercial success it is expected to induce a protective immune response in well over 90% of children. In order for this to happen a dose, based on age, must stimulate a protective immune response in those with the weakest immune system. In the process of doing this, the other 90% or m Continue reading

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Diabetes and Swollen Feet

Diabetes and Swollen Feet

A common complication associated with diabetes is swollen feet. The swelling can come from a number of factors but the main concern is diabetic leg pain associated with neuropathy. Although its origin can be traced to several different factors, it is still a very serious condition which, left untreated, could result in irreparable nerve and blood vessel damage and even amputation.
It is a common known fact that diabetes can result in poor blood circulation. The problem is that the circulation appears in other parts of the body, as well. The reason that the legs are usually affected more is a decreased level of activity and prolonged sitting.
Another common occurrence is a pooling of blood in the lower extremities called peripheral vascular disease. This occurs when there is a thinning of the blood vessels or an obstruction of the large arteries of the legs. This, too, can be associated with being a complication of diabetes and a lack of exercise and mobility.
Poor circulation can also result in neuropathy, or nerve damage. This happens because blood is not flowing properly and the diminished blood supply eventually begins to take its toll. Once the nerves are subjected to extreme damage, they become damaged forever. Unfortunately, by the time pain is felt, some damage has usually already occurred. That’s why it is important that you contact your doctor immediately once you begin to experience tingling, pain, or numbness.
Properly managing your glucose is a good way to ward off leg pain. Exercising and eating right will also do wonders, as will drinking plenty of water and Continue reading

Lab-Grown Human Beta Cells Have Blocked Diabetes in Mice For Good

Lab-Grown Human Beta Cells Have Blocked Diabetes in Mice For Good

For the first time, researchers have converted induced pluripotent stem cells - cells capable of turning into any other type of cell - into fully functioning pancreatic beta cells, and when transplanted into diabetic mice, they blocked the disease altogether.
While the process has yet to be tested in humans, the results are exciting, because the hallmark of diabetes is a loss of functioning beta cells. If we can figure out how to transplant new, healthy beta cells into diabetes patients, we're looking at an actual cure, not just a treatment. "This discovery will enable us to produce potentially unlimited supplies of transplantable cells derived from a patient's own cells," lead researcher Ronald Evans told ABC News.
Diabetes, simply put, involves the loss of functioning beta cells in the pancreas: either these cells die (type I diabetes) or they don't do as they're told (type II diabetes), and in both cases, it leads to a lack of insulin to regulate the glucose levels in the blood. For a long time, scientists have been trying to replace these damaged or dead beta cells with healthy ones, and it finally looks as though they might have cracked it (in mice, at least).
When researchers at the Salk Institute in California transplanted these human beta cells into mice with type I diabetes, the diabetes symptoms disappeared. In this case, the scientists depressed the immune systems in the mice to prevent the human tissue from being rejected, but this would probably be unnecessary in human trials, if the beta cells could be developed from a patient's own stem cells.
The research bu Continue reading

Gold-Doped Graphene Wrist Strap Could Help Manage Diabetes Without Needles

Gold-Doped Graphene Wrist Strap Could Help Manage Diabetes Without Needles

For many diabetics, life is managed one insulin-filled syringe after another. But if an new experimental wristband is further refined, they may be able to ditch the needles for good.
The device is a clear rubbery band embedded with sinuous traces of gold and gold-doped graphene drug delivery system and sensors. It senses changes in the wearer’s sweat and, on a wirelessly connected device like a smartphone, correlates that with changes in blood glucose level. When necessary, it delivers a dose of the drug metformin, which primarily suppresses glucose production in the liver, via an array of microneedles.
Details of the new device were published this week in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
Since the changes in a person’s sweat lag glucose fluctuations by 15-20 minutes, the device is only suitable to daily ebbs and flows of insulin levels. At this point, it also cannot handle incidents of hypoglycemia, or when a person’s blood sugar levels are too low.
Here’s Philip E. Ross, writing for IEEE Spectrum:
The researchers proved that the system can normalize blood sugar in lab experiments on animals. However, though the device has administered metformin to human subjects, it didn’t supply very much of the drug.
Though the device’s capabilities are relatively limited, it has “moved the field closer to this coveted prize” of non-invasive glucose monitoring and management, wrote Richard Guy in the same issue of Nature.
The graphene-based wristband is the one of the latest applications of wearable electronics, a field I profiled in July 2014. Flexible sensors and dru Continue reading

Defeating Diabetes

Defeating Diabetes

Wow, wow, wow! Where do I even start? I love you all so much. The past 72 hours have been insane, overwhelming and SO WONDERFUL!
I have so many things going on that I want to share with you, and I have all year to blog for you guys, so I will get to everything. It’s such a hard decision to even know where to start though! Since diabetes is what has really brought in the most social media attention, I decided I am going to tell you a little bit about my story and my message to you all!
In February 2012, my world was flipped upside down by my diabetes diagnosis. For a while, I pretended that I didn’t have diabetes, hoping it would go away. That led to crazy blood sugars, of course, and a very sick, grumpy, and discouraged Sierra.
In the summer, my friend asked me to compete at Miss Magic Valley (our local pageant in Twin Falls, Idaho—the winner goes to Miss Idaho the following summer). To compete, I needed a platform and I chose diabetes. I was a very different, less confident girl then. I didn’t know what I wanted to do with my platform, or how to make it happen. Needless to say, I did not win Miss Magic Valley 2012, and that was totally okay! Life went on, and I met new friends and learned a lot! In addition, I decided that if nothing else, I was going to take the best care of my diabetes as possible to show others that it was possible.
A couple months later, I competed in another pageant, and WON! However, I competed at Miss Idaho last summer and didn’t make top 11 (out of 18 girls). I came home, competed for Miss Magic Valley 2013, won, and have spent the last y Continue reading

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