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Solera Health And The American Diabetes Association® Collaborate To Help Prevent And Delay Type 2 Diabetes For Millions Of Americans

Solera Health and the American Diabetes Association® Collaborate to Help Prevent and Delay Type 2 Diabetes for Millions of Americans

Solera Health and the American Diabetes Association® Collaborate to Help Prevent and Delay Type 2 Diabetes for Millions of Americans

Relationship Will Facilitate Access to CDC-Recognized Diabetes Prevention Programs for Eligible Consumers
PHOENIX, AZ – October 18, 2017 – Solera Health (Solera), a preventive care benefits manager, today announced that they have joined forces with the American Diabetes Association (Association) to connect at-risk Americans to a Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The initiative seeks to help millions of Americans prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes by providing a streamlined process for adults at risk for type 2 diabetes to enroll in a community or digital DPP.
The National DPP is a partnership of public and private organizations working together to reduce the growing number of Americans with and at risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. There are currently more than 1,500 DPPs, including brick-and-mortar locations such as community non-profits, health systems, retail pharmacies and faith-based organizations, as well as virtual DPPs that deliver content to mobile devices, computers and/or telephones. All programs are working to make it easier for people at risk for type 2 diabetes to participate in affordable and high-quality lifestyle change programs to reduce their risk and improve their overall health.
According to the CDC’s National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017, more than 84 million American adults are estimated to have prediabetes and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Nearly 90 percent of American adults who have prediabetes are not aware they have it. Through this colla Continue reading

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17 Tips to Manage Diabetes in Hot Weather or on Vacation

17 Tips to Manage Diabetes in Hot Weather or on Vacation

Summer brings special challenges for people with diabetes. These tips can help you safely manage diabetes in hot weather and when you’re on vacation.
The effects of heat are more strongly felt by people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes for several reasons:
Complications that are common for people with diabetes include damage to nerves or blood vessels. This damage means sweat glands cannot effectively cool the body. When the humidity is also high, sweat doesn’t evaporate and the body cannot cool itself. It’s easier for people with diabetes to develop heat exhaustion or heat stroke, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Consider this to be a medical emergency and get help quickly.
They more quickly lose water from their bodies (become dehydrated) when it’s hot, compared to people without diabetes. They need to drink more fluids to keep blood sugar levels from increasing. High blood sugar increases the need to pee, making dehydration worse. Also, “water pills” (diuretics) used to treat high blood pressure can worsen dehydration.
Insulin use can change because hot weather changes how the body uses insulin. The CDC recommends testing your blood sugar more often, adjusting the insulin dose, and adjusting what you eat and drink.
Top tips for summer if you have diabetes:
Drink more fluids, especially water, even if you’re not thirsty. Waiting until you’re thirsty means you’re already dehydrated. Avoid alcoholic beverages and those with caffeine, including coffee, tea, energy or sports drinks and cola drinks. They can make you lose more Continue reading

Diabetic by HbA1c, Normal by OGTT: A Frequent Finding in the Mexico City Diabetes Study

Diabetic by HbA1c, Normal by OGTT: A Frequent Finding in the Mexico City Diabetes Study

The agreement between glucose-based and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)–based American Diabetes Association criteria in the diagnosis of normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, or diabetes is under scrutiny. A need to explore the issue among different populations exists.
All 854 participants without known diabetes had both oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and HbA1c measurements on the same day of the 2008 phase.
We found by OGTT normal glucose tolerance (NGT) in 512 (59.9%) participants, prediabetes [impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)] in 261 (30.5%), and diabetes in 81 (9.4%). In total, 232 in the NGT group (45.3%) and 158 in the prediabetes group (60.5%) had HbA1c ≥6.5%. Body mass index, waist circumference, and blood pressure were significantly different among OGTT-defined diabetic status groups but not in the HbA1c-diagnosed group. We identified 404 participants in the NGT group with confirmed NGT throughout all phases of the Mexico City Diabetes Study. Of these, 184 (45.5%) had HbA1c ≥6.5%. In a vital/diabetes status follow-up performed subsequently, we found that, of these, 133 remained nondiabetic, 3 had prediabetes, 7 had diabetes, and 13 had died without diabetes; we were unable to ascertain the glycemic status in 5 and vital status in 23.
The patient was a 47-year-old Japanese man whose parents were first cousins. He lacked secondary sexual characteristics owing to normosmic CHH. Exon segments for the KISS1R gene in this patient were screened for mutations. Functional analyses were performed using HEK293 cells expressing KISS1R mu Continue reading

Sugar, Uric Acid, and the Etiology of Diabetes and Obesity

Sugar, Uric Acid, and the Etiology of Diabetes and Obesity

The intake of added sugars, such as from table sugar (sucrose) and high-fructose corn syrup has increased dramatically in the last hundred years and correlates closely with the rise in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Fructose is a major component of added sugars and is distinct from other sugars in its ability to cause intracellular ATP depletion, nucleotide turnover, and the generation of uric acid. In this article, we revisit the hypothesis that it is this unique aspect of fructose metabolism that accounts for why fructose intake increases the risk for metabolic syndrome. Recent studies show that fructose-induced uric acid generation causes mitochondrial oxidative stress that stimulates fat accumulation independent of excessive caloric intake. These studies challenge the long-standing dogma that “a calorie is just a calorie” and suggest that the metabolic effects of food may matter as much as its energy content. The discovery that fructose-mediated generation of uric acid may have a causal role in diabetes and obesity provides new insights into pathogenesis and therapies for this important disease.
Fructose-induced weight gain and metabolic syndrome
Experimental studies from the 1950s showed the peculiar ability of fructose to induce insulin resistance in laboratory rats. Today, fructose intake has been shown to induce all features of metabolic syndrome in rats, as well as oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, fatty liver, microalbuminuria and kidney disease (rev. in 1). Similar findings can be shown when animals are fed sucrose or high-fructose corn s Continue reading

Is Pumpkin Good or Bad for Diabetics?

Is Pumpkin Good or Bad for Diabetics?

Diabetes is a complicated condition. It can best be managed with a well-disciplined lifestyle, regular physical exercise, and a well-balanced, healthy diet. Hence, a diabetic is always concerned about what he or she should eat and what he or she should not eat. In this article, we shall analyze whether eating pumpkin is good or bad for a person who is suffering from diabetes. So, come and join in for the article “Is Pumpkin Good Or Bad For Diabetics?
Facts About Pumpkin
To begin with, let us look into some of the facts about pumpkin before analyzing the risks and rewards of including pumpkin in the diet of a person who happens to suffer from diabetes.
One cup of pumpkin is known to contain around 3 grams of fiber and 7.5 grams of carbohydrates. However, the vegetable is less starchy as compared to some of the other vegetables.
Pumpkin has a low-calorie content. The number of calories in the vegetable is just around 30 units
Beta-carotene is responsible for the orange color of the vegetable
The vegetable is known to be a rich source of several nutrients, vitamins, and minerals including iron, potassium, zinc, magnesium, vitamin A, as well as vitamin C.
Although the glycemic index is high at 75, it has a low glycemic load of 3 which means that it does not lead to an increase in the levels of blood glucose to a considerable extent when compared to other vegetables.
The following paragraphs explain the advantages and disadvantages of eating pumpkin by a patient who is suffering from diabetes:
Benefits of Including Pumpkin in a Diabetic Diet
The following are the advantages of Continue reading

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