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Smart Blood Sugar Review Control Diabetes With Food

Smart Blood Sugar Review  Control Diabetes With Food

Smart Blood Sugar Review Control Diabetes With Food


Smart Blood Sugar Review Control Diabetes With Food
Smart Blood Sugar- Hope For Diabetic Patients
Smart Blood Sugar is the title of an ebook which is based on ways to control diabetes. It helps you to evaluate your body status, on which levels your sugar is. How can you control it and how many ways can be used by you. It is a complete detail of what diabetes is, how can you prevent its risk in the easiest ways.
By the details, it has a mysterious status. In this review, I will evaluate the ebook Smart Blood Sugar for its accuracy and authenticity. The online testimonials are highly positive, but still, it needs so much to be talked about. Before going any further, lets check the brief details of the ebook are as following.
Are you a person who feels lethargic doing physical activity? Are you already a surfer of diabetes and are on diabetic medicines? Do you want to find a way which can reduce your insulin injections daily? Have you come across treating diabetes with home based natural remedies? Do you want to switch regular medicines with safe herbal alternatives? Do you want to get rid of diabetes or any associated problem? Given all the information, if any of the answers from up listed questions is yes, then you are the one who actually needs Smart Blood Sugar in your life. It is more convenient to take care of a disease at home, with and ease and comfort rather than rushing to the hospitals and doctors now and then.
Smart Blood Sugar is a downloadable ebook which is available online. It is a complete guide on what is diabetes, why is it called, what is the actual Continue reading

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Stevia and Diabetes

Stevia and Diabetes

Using sugar as a sweetener can be a dangerous choice for people with diabetes. The good news is that diabetics now have a multitude of options for sweetening their morning cup of coffee compared to years ago. In the U.S., that choice has expanded to include a component of stevia (rebaudioside A). Stevia's stevioside compounds are also approved by European food authorities, and stevia has been used as for centuries in South America. (1-2)
Safety Concerns About Artificial Sweeteners
Concerns about artificial sweeteners have fueled research into natural alternatives. Worries began with the earliest artificial sweetener - saccharin. Once upon a time, saccharin was the only sweetener available for diabetics and for those looking to cut calories (in the United States). But in 1972, saccharin was removed from the FDA's "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) list. (3-4)
The problem was that saccharin is it's known to cause cancer in animals. The National Toxicology Program later determined (in 2000) that it's no longer a potential carcinogen in humans. However, during the almost 30 years in between other sweeteners were developed and approved. (3-4)
The Aspartame Controversy
Side effects and health conditions linked to these newer sweeteners, especially aspartame, continue to be reported. Some complaints are supported by science. For example, excessive levels in the blood of one of the byproducts of ingesting aspartame can cause brain damage. The FDA suggests that only people with certain rare genetic disorders (or the fetuses of pregnant women with these disorders) could accrue hig Continue reading

Remote Screening for Pediatric Diabetes Gets Closer

Remote Screening for Pediatric Diabetes Gets Closer


For Professionals Research Updates Type 2 Diabetes
Remote Screening for Pediatric Diabetes Gets Closer
Researchers sought to determine if the use of a computerized support system would allow for improved identification of pediatric patients at high risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, and its implications to initiate earlier treatment.
With Tamara S. Hannon, MD, MS, and Elena Christofides, MD
Given the rising prevalence of diabetes in the pediatric population, the value of a remote screening method to foster an earlier, more consistent diagnosis, was pursued with the aim of improving clinical outcomes.
Tamara S. Hannon, MD, MS, associate professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Indiana, and her colleagues, sought to employ the Child Health Improvement Through Computer Automation (CHICA), a computerized clinical decision support system, to decrease screening barriers and improve rates of diagnosis and follow-up for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in children;1 the study was published in JAMA Pediatrics .
The findings indicated that the proportion of youths meeting the outcomes criteria for T2Dbody mass index (BMI) and at least 2 other risk factors was an astonishing 41.3%.1
Based on the authors literature review, they had expected greater than 20% of their patients 10 years or older would have a BMI at or above the 85thpercentile and at least 2 risk factors for T2D.2
While the CHICA analysis did not increase the proportion of youths identified with diabetes risk factors, it more than quadrupled the rate of scree Continue reading

Glycaemic control in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus during and after cancer treatment: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Glycaemic control in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus during and after cancer treatment: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Abstract
Cancer and Diabetes Mellitus (DM) are leading causes of death worldwide and the prevalence of both is escalating. People with co-morbid cancer and DM have increased morbidity and premature mortality compared with cancer patients with no DM. The reasons for this are likely to be multifaceted but will include the impact of hypo/hyperglycaemia and diabetes therapies on cancer treatment and disease progression. A useful step toward addressing this disparity in treatment outcomes is to establish the impact of cancer treatment on diabetes control.
The aim of this review is to identify and analyse current evidence reporting glycaemic control (HbA1c) during and after cancer treatment.
Methods
Systematic searches of published quantitative research relating to comorbid cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus were conducted using databases, including Medline, Embase, PsychINFO, CINAHL and Web of Science (February 2017). Full text publications were eligible for inclusion if they: were quantitative, published in English language, investigated the effects of cancer treatment on glycaemic control, reported HbA1c (%/mmols/mol) and included adult populations with diabetes. Means, standard deviations and sample sizes were extracted from each paper; missing standard deviations were imputed. The completed datasets were analysed using a random effects model. A mixed-effects analysis was undertaken to calculate mean HbA1c (%/mmols/mol) change over three time periods compared to baseline.
The available literature exploring glycaemic control post-diagnosis was mixed. There was increased risk Continue reading

How Does High Salt/Sodium Intake Affect a Diabetic? | Diabetes Self Caring

How Does High Salt/Sodium Intake Affect a Diabetic? | Diabetes Self Caring


How Does High Salt Intake Affect a Diabetic?
How Does High Salt Intake Affect a Diabetic?
It is a saying that you should take your life with a pinch of salt. But it cant be said in the case of a person suffering from diabetes. It is a known fact that a diabetic should eat everything in moderation. That even includes salt. Excessive usage of salt increases the risk of cardiovascular attack or heart stroke as well. It is expected from people who are diabetic that should cut the sodium intake in their food and that doesnt mean that they should just a tasteless or plain food. Cutting down sodium means cutting down on the canned vegetables , canned soup, salad dressings and cereals. Though the percentage of sodium mentioned on the label may or may not be right, it is still better to avoid things which contain sodium. Being a diabetic one must always keep an eye on sodium intake as people even experience high blood pressure after a salty food intake.
Salt is not known to increase the blood sugar levels but still as a part of a diabetes management program it is best to limit it. Eating salt can lead to high blood pressure levels and which not only increases the risk of heart attacks but also the kidney failure and in severe cases, may even lead to stomach cancer.
There are some tips to help you reduce the intake of salt in your diet
Findings and Research on Risk of High Salt intake linked to Diabetes
There are a few findings from the Institute of Environmental Medicine IMM at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden which have proved to be very beneficial on the subject:
For ever Continue reading

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