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Signs Of Low Blood Sugar And Type 2 Diabetes

Signs of Low Blood Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes

Signs of Low Blood Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is not just a concern for people with type 1 diabetes. Although it does not happen as often, people with type 2 diabetes also can be at risk and should be familiar with the signs of low blood sugar.
Blood sugar levels are considered too low when they drop below 70 mg/dL. Sometimes, people can experience symptoms at higher blood sugar levels, especially if their blood sugars have been elevated for an extended period of time.
When blood sugars drop below 70 mg/dL, the body may not have enough blood sugar (glucose) to provide for energy needs. If symptoms become severe without treatment or correction, low blood sugar levels can cause harm or even death. Knowing the signs and how to treat low blood sugar can help you avoid emergencies.
Increased Risks and Causes
Children, Older Adults, and Those With Hypoglycemia Unawareness
Those at higher risk for hypoglycemia include children, older adults, and those people who cannot identify low blood sugars—a term referred to as hypoglycemia unawareness. Hypoglycemia unawareness can occur if you are someone who experiences low blood sugars frequently. The frequency of low blood sugar can make the body desensitized to symptoms.The inability to feel symptoms, such as sweating, shaking, increased heart beat, anxiety or hunger, can make you incapable of treating the low which can result in unconsciousness or even death.
Therefore, it's important to know if you are at risk so that you can prevent and treat low blood sugars quickly and safely.
Certain Medications:
People taking certain medications for type 2 dia Continue reading

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Genetically Engineered Insulin may CAUSE Diabetes Type 1 in Type 2 Diabetics

Genetically Engineered Insulin may CAUSE Diabetes Type 1 in Type 2 Diabetics

Just when you think GMO crops have caused enough damage as possible, there’s a new study proving their munificence to a deeper level. A new study shows that GE-created synthetic insulin could actually cause Diabetes Type 1 in Type 2 diabetics. Thank you biotech industry for creating a potentially new way to get diabetes.
The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism and titled “Insulin administration may trigger type 1 diabetes in Japanese type 2 diabetes patients with type 1 diabetes high-risk HLA class II and the insulin gene VNTR genotype,” is posing a possible explanation for why insulin treatment may accelerate morbidity and mortality in Type 2 diabetics.
The research showed that administering genetically susceptible Type 2 diabetes patients with recombinant insulin can trigger their bodies to target their own insulin, producing cells for autoimmune destruction and effectively producing ‘double diabetes’: Type 1 and Type 2, as a result.
Recombinant refers to anything that is inserted with foreign DNA (molecular cloning or genetic alteration) to make a new sequence. Insulin is no different. Our bodies already make their own natural insulin, but in diabetes Type 2 patients, their pancreatic secretions are not sufficient to make enough insulin and glucagon, and therefore they end up taking insulin to balance their sugar levels.
The Study
The latest study pointing to GMO insulin as the culprit in creating diabetes Type 1 took 6 patients (4 men and 2 women) in Japan with diabetes Type 2, all whom had not previously received insulin the Continue reading

How to Treat the Root Cause of Diabetes

How to Treat the Root Cause of Diabetes

After about age 20, we may have all the insulin-producing beta cells we’re ever going to get. So, if we lose them, we may lose them for good. Autopsy studies show that by the time type 2 diabetes is diagnosed, we may have already killed off half of our beta cells.
You can kill pancreatic cells right in a petri dish. If you expose the insulin-producing beta cells in our pancreas to fat, they suck it up and then start dying off. Fat breakdown products can interfere with the function of these cells and ultimately lead to their death. A chronic increase in blood fat levels can be harmful to our pancreas.
It’s not just any fat; it’s saturated fat. As you can see in my video, What Causes Diabetes?, predominant fat in olives, nuts, and avocados gives a tiny bump in death protein 5, but saturated fat really elevates this contributor to beta cell death. Therefore, saturated fats are harmful to beta cells. Cholesterol is, too. The uptake of bad cholesterol (LDL) can cause beta cell death as a result of free radical formation.
Diets rich in saturated fats not only cause obesity and insulin resistance, but the increased levels of circulating free fats in the blood (non-esterified fatty acids, or NEFAs) may also cause beta cell death and may thus contribute to the progressive beta cell loss we see in type 2 diabetes. These findings aren’t just based on test tube studies. When researchers have infused fat directly into people’s bloodstreams, they can show it directly impairing pancreatic beta cell function. The same occurs when we ingest it.
Type 2 diabetes is characterized by Continue reading

UCSD Study Finds Root Cause of Type 2 Diabetes

UCSD Study Finds Root Cause of Type 2 Diabetes

NBC 7 San Diego
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, believe they have discovered the "root cause" of Type 2 diabetes — a molecular link between obesity and diabetes that may lead to new treatment.
Inflammation that results from obesity leads to insulin resistance, the first step in developing Type 2 diabetes, the study found.
One inflammatory molecule in particular, LTB4, is released by immune cells living in extra fat, called macrophages. Positive feedback then signals for the body to release more macrophages, which then release more LTB4 into the fatty cells in the liver, researchers found.
"This study is important because it reveals a root cause of type 2 diabetes," the study's senior author Dr. Jerrold M. Olefsky, professor of medicine and associate dean for scientific affairs, said in a statement. "And now that we understand that LTB4 is the inflammatory factor causing insulin resistance, we can inhibit it to break the link between obesity and diabetes."
Those LTB4 then bind to nearby cell surfaces, the researchers found. In people who are obese, those cells become inflamed and the body becomes resistant to insulin.
In the UC San Diego study, Olefsky and his team of researchers used genetically engineered mice to look for ways to reverse insulin resistance.
The team created genetically engineered mice that did not have the LTB4 receptor. Without the receptor, the health of obese mice “dramatically improved.”
The study was authored by Pingping Li, Da Young Oh, Gautam Bandyopadhyay, William S. Lagakos, Saswata Talukdar, Olivia Osborn, Andrew Joh Continue reading

Dressing Diabetes

Dressing Diabetes

You’ve probably seen an insulin pump, even if you didn’t realize it. Most of them look like clunky pagers connected by medical tubing to an injection where the insulin is delivered. Another kind is “wireless“ and looks like a little pod, which is controlled by a separate remote. With the first, the wearer is dealing with a Game Boy-like device strapped onto some part of her clothing or tucked away in a pocket. With the second comes an ovular bulge protruding from her arm or stomach.
Neither option is particularly subtle, and newly diagnosed 17-year-old me was repulsed by both.
Like most high school juniors, I was full of insecurities about literally everything from my shoe size to my handwriting.
Like most high school juniors, I was full of insecurities about literally everything from my shoe size to my handwriting, but mostly about my skin — I also have a genetic condition called keratosis pilaris, which causes my skin to be dry, bumpy, and often reddish. My body and the way clothes fit on it was one thing I was confident about, so wearing a bulky insulin pump (all the time, forever) was highly unappealing.
“What if I want to wear a dress that doesn’t have pockets? What about prom? What about dance competitions? What about the beach?” I was a busy high schooler and I didn’t want to take the time to think about these things while I got dressed every day. I certainly didn’t want to draw negative attention to myself. I didn’t want to answer questions from rude mean high schoolers about my disease. I didn’t want people to treat me like a sick person. Mo Continue reading

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