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Scientists Have Created A Painless Patch That Can Control Diabetes Without Injections

Scientists Have Created a Painless Patch That Can Control Diabetes Without Injections

Scientists Have Created a Painless Patch That Can Control Diabetes Without Injections

Scientists have been struggling for decades to free diabetics from regular insulin injections. One of the main goals has been to figure out how to transplant healthy beta cells - the insulin-producing cells that fail as a result of diabetes - into patients, but this is an invasive procedure in itself that comes with the risk of rejection.
Now researchers have come up with a simpler option - they've created a synthetic patch that's covered in natural beta cells, which can be stuck painlessly to a patient's skin to secrete insulin when it's required and safely control blood sugar levels, no injection or monitoring required.
The patch hasn't been tested on humans as yet, but it's already been shown to safely control the blood sugar levels of mice for at least 10 hours at a time, and the concept is an upgrade of the 'smart insulin patch' that was reported last year by the same team.
The main difference is while the previous patch contained synthetic insulin, the new patch contains real, live beta cells, which means it's able to more safely manage a patient's blood sugar levels for longer, without the risk of over- or under-doing it.
And because the beta cells are kept on a patch safely outside of the patient's body, there's no chance of them being rejected by the immune system.
"This study provides a potential solution for the tough problem of rejection, which has long plagued studies on pancreatic cell transplants for diabetes," said lead researcher Zhen Gu from the University of North Carolina. "Plus it demonstrates that we can build a bridge between the physiological signals Continue reading

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Pump it up! Weightlifting 'cuts diabetes risk in women'

Pump it up! Weightlifting 'cuts diabetes risk in women'

Women who pump iron in the gym cut their risk of developing diabetes, say researchers.
The findings come from a study that tracked the health of nearly 100,000 US nurses over a period of eight years.
Lifting weights, doing press-ups or similar resistance exercises to give the muscles a workout was linked with a lower risk of diabetes, the work in PLoS Medicine shows.
Adults are already advised to do such exercise at least twice a week.
We know for certain that the best way to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes is to maintain a healthy weight by eating a healthy, balanced diet and by taking regularly physical activityDr Richard Elliott , Diabetes UK
Check your risk of type 2 diabetes
The benefit seen in the study was on top of any gained from doing aerobic workouts that exercise the heart and lungs - something which adults are meant to do for at least 150 minutes a week.
Women who engaged in at least 150 minutes a week of aerobic activity and at least an hour a week of muscle-strengthening activities had the most substantial risk reduction compared with inactive women. They cut their odds of developing type 2 diabetes by a third.
Experts already know that regular aerobic exercise, such as jogging, brisk walking or swimming, can help stave off type 2 diabetes.
The latest work suggests adding resistance training to exercise regimes - something already recommended by the NHS - will give further protection.
The Harvard Medical School researchers point out that their work is not perfect - it looked at only nurses who were mostly Caucasian and relied on the study participants rep Continue reading

New Study Links Wheat To Weight Gain and Diabetes

New Study Links Wheat To Weight Gain and Diabetes

A new animal study published in the journal PLoS sheds light on a possible mechanism behind the weight- and diabetes-promoting properties of wheat observed in humans, and perhaps offers some vindication for Dr. William Davis' New York Times best-selling but heavily criticized book 'Wheat Belly,' wherein the argument is made that wheat is a major contributing factor to the epidemic of obesity and diabetes presently afflicting wealthier, gluten-grain consuming nations.
In the new study, researchers from The Bartholin Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark, explored the role that gliadin, a difficult to digest class of proteins within wheat, plays in promoting weight gain and insulin secretion in both animal and cell models, finding that gliadin-treated mice gained 20% more weight (by day 100) than gliadin-free controls, and that gliadin fragments induce insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells, the cells responsible for producing insulin, and which in type 1 diabetes are destroyed or rendered dysfunctional.
Gliadin does not break down easily in the body because they are extremely hydrophobic ("water fearing"), and contain disulfide bonds (the same kind found in human hair and vulcanized rubber);[1] as a result, undigested wheat gliadin fragments can enter through the intestinal wall, gaining systemic access to the human body. This can result in inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, among many other possible negative health effects (note: we have documented over 200 adverse health effects associated with wheat exposure).
Gliadin fragments have even been found in mother's milk, ind Continue reading

Cannabis linked to prevention of diabetes

Cannabis linked to prevention of diabetes

INDYPULSE
Cannabis linked to prevention of diabetes
Smoking cannabis may prevent the development of diabetes, one of the most rapidly rising chronic disorders in the world.
If the link is proved, it could lead to the development of treatments based on the active ingredient of cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), without its intoxicating effects.
Researchers have found that regular users of the drug had lower levels of the hormone insulin after fasting – a signal that they are protected against diabetes. They also had reduced insulin resistance. Cannabis is widely smoked in the United States with over 17 million current users of whom more than four million smoke it on a daily basis. In the UK latest figures show 2.3 million people used cannabis in the last year, but the numbers have declined in the last decade.
Two US states have recently legalised its recreational use and 19 others have legalised it for medical purposes by patients with one of several conditions including multiple sclerosis and cancer. THC has already been approved to treat the side effects of chemotherapy, nausea in cancer patients, anorexia associated with AIDS and other conditions.
The study involved almost 5,000 patients who answered a questionnaire about their drug use and were part of the National Health and Nutrition Survey between 2005 and 2010. The results showed almost 2,000 had used cannabis at some point in their lives and more than one in 10 (579) were current users. Only those who had used cannabis within the past month showed evidence of protection against diabetes, suggesting that the eff Continue reading

Treating Diabetes with Cannabis?

Treating Diabetes with Cannabis?

I am still grinning. Can you see me? Over 10 years back in 2005, we published a brief post here at the ‘Mine about how cannabis (yep: pot, grass, weed, ganja...) can be used to treat diabetes. Really, completely legit! And people have been flocking here ever since to learn more.
Now, at the kickoff of 2016, we’re updating that post with a bunch more detail. Seriously, there is a growing body of research (OK, much of it in animals) showing that cannabis can have a number of positive effects on diabetes.
It begins with that original 2005 research paper that we highlighted from the American Alliance for Medical Cannabis (AAMC), which purported that cannabis can have the following benefits for PWDs (people with diabetes):
stabilizing blood sugars (confirmed via "a large body of anecdotal evidence building among diabetes sufferers")
anti-inflammatory action that may help quell some of the arterial inflammation common in diabetes
"neuroprotective" effects that help thwart inflammation of nerves and reduce the pain of neuropathy by activating receptors in the body and brain
"anti-spasmodic agents" help relieve muscle cramps and the pain of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders
acts as a "vasodilator" to help keep blood vessels open and improve circulation
contributes to lower blood pressure over time, which is vital for diabetics
substituting cannabis butter and oil in foods "benefits cardiac and arterial health in general"
it can also be used to make topical creams to relieve neuropathic pain and tingling in hands and feet
helps calm diabetic "restless leg syndrome" (RLS), so the p Continue reading

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