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Sanofi Falls Short In Q3 As Diabetes And MS Sales Disappoint

Sanofi falls short in Q3 as diabetes and MS sales disappoint

Sanofi falls short in Q3 as diabetes and MS sales disappoint


Sanofi falls short in Q3 as diabetes and MS sales disappoint
Sanofi is counting on innovations in MS and other fast-growing markets to fuel its growth.
To make up for a slow and painful decline of its aging diabetes unit, Sanofi has been counting on newer market entrieslike Aubagio and Lemtrada to treat multiple sclerosis. And during the third quarter, both drugs did see their sales grow19% and 5% respectively, in fact. But that wasnt enough to ease investors fears that the French drug giants innovation engine may not be able to outpace the diabetes decline.
Aubagio brought in 382 million ($445 million) during the quarter, while Lemtrada sales were 113 million ($132million). Both numbers came in below analysts expectations. The companys overall sales of 9.05 billion ($10.55 billion) also fell short of the average forecast of 9.26 billion. Sanofis net income was 1.6 billion ($1.9 billion), or 1.71 ($1.99) per share, up 1% year over year, and the company reiterated its guidance that earnings for the full year would be flat over last year.
Sanofis diabetes franchise has been hammered by a combination of patent expirations and pricing pressure on newer productsin the U.S. Last year, both CVS and United Health removed Sanofis insulin mainstay, Lantus from their formularies, replacing it with Eli Lillys Basaglar, a cheaper biosimilar. Sanofis diabetes sales have dropped 20% in the U.S. year-to-date, and the company warned of an accelerated decline in the fourth quarter as the full impact of the CVS and United exclusions hits.
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Soup | Gestational Diabetes UK

Soup | Gestational Diabetes UK


It's cold outside and you want something warm and filling. You know a salad just isn't going to cut it, but you don't want a large meal. What do most people fancy? Soup!
Soup may may seem like a great meal on a gestational diabetes diet, warm, filling, nutritious. But wait!...
This tin of soup contains 34g of carbs, that's 8 tsp of sugar
Did you know that a can of soup can contain as much as 34g of carbs, that's the equivalent to 8 tsp of sugar! Plus you most probably will dip some bread in there too, so even if you pick a better tolerated one like Burgen soya & linseed (11g carbs per 800g slice), that could easily be 45g carbs or 11 tsp of sugar with little protein and fat to help 'pair ' or slow down the release of that sugar.
On this post we'll share with you lots of better alternatives for soups and some hints and tips. We'll also share some of most commonly used soups that causes ladies problems.
Soup releases sugar faster into the bloodstream
Just like with anything blitzed, pureed, or mashed, soups have been cooked down and very often blended. This means that your body has to do less work to break down soup and glucose will be released faster into the bloodstream. To help this, when making soup you could eat it chunky and increase the protein and fat in the soup to help slow down the release of glucose.
Tinned soups can have high carb amounts, usually the nutritional information on the labels are shown per 100gand you will no doubt be eating more than 100g. A standard tin of soup is 400g and so most will eat at least 200g. Some cans have nutritional informa Continue reading

Diabetes drug and aspirin boosts cancer drug effectiveness | Daily Mail Online

Diabetes drug and aspirin boosts cancer drug effectiveness | Daily Mail Online


Metformin may slow breast cancer growth and reverse treatment resistance
Adding aspirin to a cancer drug could help combat tumors resistant to therapies
These include pancreatic, lung and colorectal cancers, as well as melanomas
A widely-used diabetes drug and over-the-counter aspirin could help boost the effectiveness of cancer treatments, two studies suggest.
Research has found that metformin used to improve the way your body handles insulin may slow breast cancer growth and reverse treatment resistance.
Another study discovered adding aspirin to a cancer drug could make it more powerful in combating a group of tumors that are highly resistant to therapies.
These include some pancreatic, lung and colorectal cancers, as well as a small percentage of melanomas.
Together, the findings offer hope for people with certain difficult-to-treat forms of the disease.
A widely-used diabetes drug and over-the-counter aspirin could help boost the effectiveness of cancer treatments, two studies suggest (stock image)
1 in 5 NBA players have heart scans that appear abnormal, study reveals
Canadian scientists found that metformin, used to treat type 2 diabetes, reduced the rapid reproduction of tumor cells in the laboratory.
It also prevented or delayed resistance to the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin.
Other laboratory experiments and tests on mice showed that metformin reversed protein markers associated with multiple drug resistance (MDR).
This meant the drug might help resistant breast cancers to start responding to treatment again, said the researchers.
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Manitoba First Nations get $19 million to fight diabetes

Manitoba First Nations get $19 million to fight diabetes


WAYNE GLOWACKI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES
A podiatry room in the Saul Sair Health Centre in the Siloam Mission.
This article was published 19/9/2017 (203 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.
Ottawa will pump $19 million over the next four years to combat the province's soaring diabetes epidemic on First Nations under a new health care deal that will focus on foot care.
Health Canada approved the funding and the lead Manitoba agency, Nanaandawewigamig, the First Nations Health and Social Secretariat of Manitoba, announced it in Portage la Prairie Tuesday.
It is believed to be the first ever regional program designed for and delivered by Indigenous people in their own communities to stem rising rates of amputation, one of the most tragic complications of diabetes
"We recognized the need and we have been working on obtaining funding to support these services for nearly 20 years," said Pimicikamak Chief Catherine Merrick, Nanaandawewigamig board chair, in a statement Tuesday.
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ADA: Oral Insulin May Delay Type 1 Diabetes Onset

ADA: Oral Insulin May Delay Type 1 Diabetes Onset


Home / Conditions / Type 1 Diabetes / ADA: Oral Insulin May Delay Type 1 Diabetes Onset
ADA: Oral Insulin May Delay Type 1 Diabetes Onset
In adults with two or more antibodies predicting the development of type 1 diabetes, treatment with daily oral insulin therapy did not prevent development of the disease, but a small subset experienced a 31-month delay in clinical diabetes development.
Close relatives of people with type 1 diabetes who had certain autoantibodies that put them at high risk of progression to clinical type 1 diabetes did not benefit from taking oral insulin vs placebo, according to a new trial. The participants were mostly children and adolescents, with a median age of 8. However, surprisingly, among a small subset of participants with the same autoantibodies against islet cells but with low insulin secretion, those who received insulin tablets were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 2.5 years later than those who got placebo.
This was the largest trial ever performed using oral insulin and even though the results were not a homerun, a pre-specified secondary hypothesis was met and there were no significant adverse events. The results showed an incremental advance as it was able to delay type 1 diabetes for 2.5 years in a subset.
Dr. Carla J. Greenbaum, who presented the results, stated that people with close relatives with type 1 diabetes have a 15-fold increased risk of developing the disease themselves.
An earlier study had suggested that if such individuals also had high levels of micro insulin autoantibodies (mIAA), taking oral insulin might buy tim Continue reading

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